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CPL US Marine Corps
SGT US Air Force
WWII - Bronze Star Medal


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Obituary -
Wallace D. Miller

Dr. Wallace D. Miller, 72, Ozark, died at 1:25 a.m. Sunday, July 18, 1999, in the Lester E. Cox Medical Center South, Springfield.
Dr. Miller was a professor for many years at Southwest Baptist University. He was an Air Force and Marine veteran of World War II and received a Bronze Star. He was also a member of the Glenstone Baptist Church, Springfield.
He was preceded in death by his father and two brothers. Survivors include two daughters, Frances Lorraine Miller, Hattiesburg, Miss., and Letitia Kay Cook, Marshfield; two sons, Wally D. Miller, Strafford, and David E. Miller, Springfield; his mother, Dorothy Miller, Oklahoma City, Okla.; his children's mother, Frances Miller, Marshfield; 12 brothers and sisters, seven grandchildrenm three great-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.
Services will be at 2 p.m. today (Wednesday) in the Fraker Funeral Home, Marshfield, with burial following in Marshfield Cemetery. 
Miller, Dr. Wallace Dyett (I202091847784)
 
2





News Banner Wells County, Indiana
June 10, 1972
MRS. JACOB YAHNE DIES AT AGE 78
A patient one week at Huntington Hospital, Mrs. Floe Yahne, 78, of Huntington died there at 11:25 p.m. Friday. Born Nov. 9, 1893 in Montpelier, she was a daughter of Samuel and Sena Hawkins Mincer. Her marriage to Jacob Yahne, who died in 1965, took place May 29, 1933 in Bluffton. She had been a resident of Wells County 50 years, having resided near Mt. Zion. There are no survivors. Friends may call after 7 p.m. 
Mincer, Flo (I202102529224)
 
3



-----CORINGTON ODELL FORD
First story as shared from Meredith Frances Ford DeBuse, Granddaughter.
Corington Odell Ford was born 15 Aug 179, at Mt Vernon, Jefferson County, Illinois. His parents were Thomas Jefferson Ford and Almeda May Allen, who were married 29 Nov 1877. Grandpa was the eldest of eight children born of this union: William Canby, Ralph, Forrest, Velma, unnamed daughter, Eliza, and Catherine William and Forrest did not survive childhood; and unnamed daughter either was stillborn or didn’t live beyond the day of her birth.
When Grandpa was about six years old, his family moved from Jefferson County to Edwards County, Kansas, where he grew to adulthood.
He married Estie Olive Collier 2 Sep 1903 at Kinsley, Edwards County, Kansas. Five children were born of this union: Orville Floyd, born 7 Jul 1904; Meredith Hiram, born 10 Jul 1906; Maryba Almeda, born 16 Apr 1910; Blanche Delores, born 29 Nov 1914; and Bessie Arline, born 29 Sep 1919.
Grandpa was a carpenter by trade; and one of my earliest memories of him is of the Christmas when I was four. He built me a grand dollhouse with six rooms, dormered roof and shutters. That Christmas, he also built me a doll bed, toy chest, and a miniature ironing board. What a luck little girl I was. These toys are now in storage for my first granddaughter.
Because he worked as a carpenter, he would get up at the wee hours (4:00 AM) of the morning to go to work. I can remember getting up with him to have flapjacks and syrup. I was three or four at the time. How my parents must of loved it.
Grandpa played the harmonica. His favorite ditty was the “Blue Tailed Fly.” I would sit for hours listening to him play. His favorite phrase for all my ailments was a mysterious illness call the “Eppazootics.”
His favorite past-time in later years of visiting us was sitting for hours on Saturday afternoons and watching all the old hour operas on TV. He also insisted that the “Lone Ranger” and the “Cisco Kid” actually lived.
Grandpa loved boiling his own coffee. He would start a pot early in the morning, and as the day wore on, kept adding more coffee and more water, until by evening, it would be so strong, that as my mother would say, “it would eat the bowl off the spoon.” He always compensated for it by adding at least for teaspoons of sugar to his cup of coffee.
Grandpa lived to be 92 years old and up until the last six months of his life, he was a bright energetic little man who had a fantastic memory for the history. Much of what I know about the Ford Family came for him.
He passed away 9 Nov 1971 and is buried along with Grandma Estie in the family plot at Hillside Cemetery, Kinsley, Kansas.
Second story shared from Dale Allen Kuhn, Grandson.
When my Grandparents would come to Wichita to visit my Grandpa took it upon his self that he would run rough shod over the Kuhn boys and get all the yard cleaned up. Trees trimmed, grass mowed, house siding washed and the yard rake. He would get of to us all day long to get the work done, sometimes we would wonder how much longer he would be visiting then Grandma would come outside and get him a few choice words to leave those boys alone.
After Grandma passed, I remember going to visit Grandpa and he would fix breakfast each morning for all of us. He always ate fried bacon and eggs, everyday. And his coffee was so good, of course with lots of sugar. Our family would come out to Grandpa’s so my Dad could work in the fields during harvest. We would stay at Grandpa’s house and he would make us rake the yard of all the leaves.




--------------------------------------------------------------
Corrington O’Dell Ford
Corrington Odell Ford and Estie Olive Collier Ford related the following information to Granddaughters: Connie Campbell, Dixie Lee Marsh Kuhn, and Meredith Frances Ford DeBuse . It had been put together on some yellow legal sheets. It was told in 1956. Some of the information is gathered from other sources.
William and Eliza Drake Ford were the parents of:
Thomas Jefferson Ford
Perry O.
Henry Steffy
Albert Amos
Eviline
Alice
Martha
Thomas Jefferson Ford married Almeda Mary Allen daughter of Hiram Richard Allen.
Their children:
The following were born near Mr. Vernon, Field Twp, Illinois:
Corrington (Corrie) Odell, Born 15 Aug 1879.
William, born 19 Jul 1882.
Ralph, born 3 Nov 1884.
After arriving in Kinsley, Kansas three daughters of Thomas and Almeda were born:
Velma, born 30 Dec 1890.
Eliza, born 23 Oct 1895.
Catherine, born 16 Oct 1901.
The family moved from Mt. Vernon, Illinois and arrived in Kinsley, Edwards County, Kansas on September 22, 1885 by train. They stayed one night in Kinsley and the next day went to 3 miles east of Fellsburg, Kansas to Uncle Perry Ford’s and stayed 2 or 3 weeks. They then went to Windell (a Stage Coach Stop, lived in a dugout) 3 miles southwest of Centerview, Kansas and lived there about 6 weeks (until late Nov.). Moved to a farm about 6 miles southeast of Kinsley and lived there through the 1885-86 blizzard. Moved to Kinsley, Kansas to a one room house across from the Court House, it had a wood barrel pump outside the house. Moved to north side of town to a two room house. Later moved to a 3 or 4 bedroom house in Kinsley.
Thomas Jefferson Ford died in Kinsley, Kansas February 25, 1902. Almeda May Allen Ford died in Kinsley, Kansas 24 Dec 1918.
Corrie married Estie Olive Collier, daughter of John Riley Collier and Mary Francis Hackett Collier, in Kinsley 2 Sep 1903.
The Collier family had come to Kinsley, Kansas from Monett, Missouri. Mary Hackett Collier had three brothers, James, Leroy and John and five sisters that Estie knew of. Ellen, Sara, Melissa, Rose Ann and Olive. John Collier (had one brother, Alvin Collier.)
John and Almeda Collier children were:
Estie Olive born 21 Feb 1886 in Monnet Missouri.
Ellen Collier Nichols.
Blanche Collier Hartnett.
Estie Olive Collier Fords grand parents were:
Sara Hackett andMeredith Hackett.
Margaret Collier and UKN Grandpa
While Corrie and Estie lived in and around Kinsley and Offerle, Kansas, four children were born.
Orville Floyd, born July 7, 1904.
Meredith Hiram, born July 10, 1906.
Maryba Almeda, born April 16, 1910.
Blanche Delores, born November 29, 1914.
The family moved to Lewis Kansas in 1917 where another daughter was born:
Bessie Arlene, born September 29, 1919
During the years Corrie’s family lived in Lewis, Kansas, Corrie worked as a section foreman for the Santa Fe railroad as a carpenter and as the town marshal.
Corrie and Estie had many fond memories. They were active members of the Christian Church, the IOOF and Rebekah lodges and the Royal Neighbors of America. They survived the 1920 scarlet fever epidemic that took so many lives. Corrie spent an hour or so many summer evenings visiting with other town men on the ‘spit and whittle’ bench in front of Pop Barnes’ drug store.
Corrie’s sister Velma and her husband Charles Norman lived in Lewis while he pastured the Methodist Church. Their son Merlin Norman moved to Divide, Colorado.
Corrie’s sister Eliza married George Hildenbrand. George resides in Kinsley Kansas. There Children:
Robert of Denver Colorado.
Thomas of Kinsley.
Corrie’s sister Catherine West Bromfield taught the 3rd and 4th grade class in Lewis school for 20 years. She then was Principle of Northside school. She and her husband moved to Chase, Kansas. She taught in Sterling for 12 years. Catherine retired to Offerle, Kansas.
Corries
Corrie’s brother Ralph married Blanche Manning. They moved from Kinsley to Ogden Utah.
Corrie’s and Estie’s children:
Orville married Iva Magill of Lewis and they raised their family in Lewis Kansas. Orville died in 12 Jul 1967.
Their children are:
Leroy Ford of Kinsley.
Wilma Ford Heap of Stafford.
· Glenn Ford, deceased.
Patsy Ford Schaller of Wichita Kansas.
Meredith graduated from Lewis High School. He married Maude Frances Pierce and settled in Portland Oregon. Meredith died July 26, 1972 in Wichita Kansas. Their daughter:
Meredith Frances.
Maryba married Everett Malone and later married David Kuhn. Her children are:
Robert Malone, deceased.
Dixie Lee Malone Kuhn Marsh, Edgar Springs Missouri.
William Kuhn, Manassas Virgin.
Ronald Kuhn, Wichita.
Larry Kuhn, Wichita.
Jerry Kuhn, Broken Arrow Oklahoma. (Jerry married Kerren Fettig of Lewis Kansas.)
Dale Kuhn, Sedgwick Kansas.
Carol Kuhn Colson, Wichita Kansas.
Delores married Joseph Adams and later married John Gehrer. They had no children.
Arline married Dixon Campbell and later married George O’Dell. Her children:
Terry Douglas Campbell, Burbank California.
Connie Campbell Lambertus, Wichita.
Richard Campbell, Huntington Beach California.
During Corrie and Estie’s life they lived
On Phil Molitors farm 8 miles south of Offerle, Kansas for about 2 months.
In Kinsley until 1909.
In Offerle until May 1910.
In Kinsley May 1909 until 1917.
In St. John 1917
In Lewis 1917 - 1930
In Dodge 1930 - March 1931
In Kinsley 1931
Made trips to Portland Oregon
1941, 16 months.
1943, Feb
1946, 6 months
1947, in Kansas until May 1948
- thru 1956
Corrie worked as:
Carpenter.
Farmer.
Section Forman on Santa Fe Railroad for 12 years.
Railroad, altogether 18 years.
Town Marshall at Lewis Kansas.
He worked on Sylvia High School in Sylvia Kansas, South Side School in Kinsley Kansas and the New Grove Hotel in Kinsley.
In 1930 Corrie and family moved to Dodge City Kansas for a short time and then moved to Kinsley Kansas where they lived with the exception of a few year during WW II, when he worked in the shipyards in Portland Oregon. Estie died June 2, 1962. Corrie continued living in Kinsley Kansas until he was 90 years old when he moved to Wichita to be near his children. Corrie died in November 9, 1971.
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· Corington Odell Ford StoryPosted 03 Apr 2011 by bat175CORINGTON ODELL FORD
First story as shared from Meredith Frances Ford DeBuse, Granddaughter.
Corington Odell Ford was born 15 Aug 179, at Mt Vernon, Jefferson County, Illinois. His parents were Thomas Jefferson Ford and Almeda May Allen, who were married 29 Nov 1877. Grandpa was the eldest of eight children born of this union: William Canby, Ralph, Forrest, Velma, unnamed daughter, Eliza, and Catherine William and Forrest did not survive childhood; and unnamed daughter either was stillborn or didn’t live beyond the day of her birth.
When Grandpa was about six years old, his family moved from Jefferson County to Edwards County, Kansas, where he grew to adulthood.
He married Estie Olive Collier 2 Sep 1903 at Kinsley, Edwards County, Kansas. Five children were born of this union: Orville Floyd, born 7 Jul 1904; Meredith Hiram, born 10 Jul 1906; Maryba Almeda, born 16 Apr 1910; Blanche Delores, born 29 Nov 1914; and Bessie Arline, born 29 Sep 1919.
Grandpa was a carpenter by trade; and one of my earliest memories of him is of the Christmas when I was four. He built me a grand dollhouse with six rooms, dormered roof and shutters. That Christmas, he also built me a doll bed, toy chest, and a miniature ironing board. What a luck little girl I was. These toys are now in storage for my first granddaughter.
Because he worked as a carpenter, he would get up at the wee hours (4:00 AM) of the morning to go to work. I can remember getting up with him to have flapjacks and syrup. I was three or four at the time. How my parents must of loved it.
Grandpa played the harmonica. His favorite ditty was the “Blue Tailed Fly.” I would sit for hours listening to him play. His favorite phrase for all my ailments was a mysterious illness call the “Eppazootics.”
His favorite past-time in later years of visiting us was sitting for hours on Saturday afternoons and watching all the old hour operas on TV. He also insisted that the “Lone Ranger” and the “Cisco Kid” actually lived.
Grandpa loved boiling his own coffee. He would start a pot early in the morning, and as the day wore on, kept adding more coffee and more water, until by evening, it would be so strong, that as my mother would say, “it would eat the bowl off the spoon.” He always compensated for it by adding at least for teaspoons of sugar to his cup of coffee.
Grandpa lived to be 92 years old and up until the last six months of his life, he was a bright energetic little man who had a fantastic memory for the history. Much of what I know about the Ford Family came for him.
He passed away 9 Nov 1971 and is buried along with Grandma Estie in the family plot at Hillside Cemetery, Kinsley, Kansas.
Second story shared from Dale Allen Kuhn, Grandson.
When my Grandparents would come to Wichita to visit my Grandpa took it upon his self that he would run rough shod over the Kuhn boys and get all the yard cleaned up. Trees trimmed, grass mowed, house siding washed and the yard rake. He would get of to us all day long to get the work done, sometimes we would wonder how much longer he would be visiting then Grandma would come outside and get him a few choice words to leave those boys alone.
After Grandma passed, I remember going to visit Grandpa and he would fix breakfast each morning for all of us. He always ate fried bacon and eggs, everyday. And his coffee was so good, of course with lots of sugar. Our family would come out to Grandpa’s so my Dad could work in the fields during harvest. We would stay at Grandpa’s house and he would make us rake the yard of all the leaves.



·
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· Wendell, KS Posted 11 Jun 2011 by
· As told to Dixie Malone Kuhn Marsh by Corington O Ford.
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Corrington Odell Ford Family Story 
Ford, Corington Odell (I202031102492)
 
4 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I202109784847)
 
5


20 June 1900 census of Summit, Chautauqua County, KS, found William Sterling and family living in dwelling #123:

William Sterling 52 12-1847 OH farmer
Sarah E. 44 9-1855 IA
Rosa M. 23 11-1877 KS
Lotta J. 17 12-1882 KS
Hattie G. 14 9-1885 KS
Emma U. 12 8-1887 KS
Elmer L. 10 12-1889 KS
Jessa B. 8 2-1892 KS
Cora A. 5 11-1894 KS




22 April 1910 census of Summit, Chautauqua County, KS, found William and family living in dwelling #40. They indicated that they had been married 34 years and all 8 of their children were still living:

William C. Sterling 61 OH OH OH
Emma S. 54 IA ME OH
Jessa B. 18 KS OH IA
Cora A. 15 KS OH IA



6 January 1920 census of Chino, San Bernardino County, CA, found the Morgan family living in dwelling #44 on 5th Street:

John H. Morgan 29 OK OK KS - Farm laborer
Cora A. Morgan 25 KS IL IL - Wife
Leona P. Morgan 5/12 CA OK KS - Daughter



13 April 1930 census of Summit, Chautauqua County, KS, found the Morgan family living in dwelling #86. John and Cora said that they were first married at ages 21 and 17 respectively:

John H. Morgan 40 OK IN OH - Farmer
Cora A. Morgan 35 KS IL IL - Wife
Leona P. Morgan 10 CA OK KS - Daughter




1940 census of San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA, found the Morgan family living in dwelling #229 at 856 Fourth Street. They said that they lived at the same place on 1 April 1935:

John H. Morgan 50 OK - 8 years of education, Laborer - WPA Project
Cora Morgan 45 KS - Wife, 8 years of education, Housework - Private family
Leona Morgan 20 CA - Daughter, Single, Completed 1 year of college education-----------------------------------------------------------------------------1943 --- CALIFORNIA DEATH INDEX 1940-1997Name: Cora A. Morgan - {Cora A, Sterling}SSN: 554-24-8864Gender: FemaleBirth Date: November 11, 1894Birth State: KansasDeath Date: September 10, 1943Death Place: San BernardinoMother's Maiden Name: NewtonFather's Surname: SterlingSource: Ancestry.comResearcher: Richard Parker 
Sterling, Cora Anna (I34554068945)
 
6


28 October 1850 census of White Oak, Franklin County, AR, found the Londagin family living in dwelling #143:

John Londagin 51 Ireland - Farmer
Susana Londagin 51 TN
Margaret Londagin 20 TN
John Londagin 19 TN - Laborer
George W. Londagin 15 TN - Laborer
Matilda Londagin 11 TN
Robert Londagin 8 TN




4 June 1860 census of Flint, Benton County, AR, found the Lundagin family living in dwelling #546:

George Lundggan 28 TN - Farmer
Roda Lundggan 22 IN
William Lindggan 3 AR
Isaac Lundggan 2 AR
Robert Lundggan 6/12 AR---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1911 Obituary - THE PASSING OF A PIONEER.GEO. W. LOUNDAGIN PASSES AWAY AFTER A LINGERING ILLNESS.At ten minutes after twelve o'clock Saturday, July 15, George W. Loundagin passed from this life, at the age of 78 years, 9 months and 20 days. He had been in poor health for a number of years and his death came not as a surprise to his many friends.
Mr Londagin was born in Meigs county, Tennessee, September 25, 1832. In the year 1848 at the age of sixteen he moved with his father's family to Arkansas, locating in Benton County. While there he met and married Rhoda J. Stewart, January 31, 1856. To this union 14 children, seven sons and seven daughter, of whom the following are left to mourn his departure:
W. J. Loundagin and Mrs. S. W. Hester of Dayton; R. D. Loundagin, J. B. Loundagin, A. G. Loundagin, Mrs. H. M. Hoover, Mrs. J. H. Meinberg and Miss Cora Loundagin, of this city; J. O. Loundagin and Mrs. T. J. Nopp, of Chesaw, Wash.; Mrs. R. P. Riggs of Portland, Ore.; and L. A. Loundagin, of Boise, Idaho.
In 1861 Mr. Loundagin crossed the plains in company with a train of 22 wagons. In 1862 he located on a homestead on the Coppet, near the present site of Waitsburg, having during the journey made a short stay alone with his family at Milton, Oregon, and one at Fort Walla Walla. During his westward journey together with his family many hardships were endured, and the perils of hostile Indians and dread disease were courageously faced. The long, tiresome way was patiently pursued until the goal they sought was reached. He has resided in this neighborhood ever since and has been on of the foremost citizens in all the worthy enterprises of the country.
In about 1875 he erected a grist mill on his farm and in 1888 built the Royal Block in Waitsburg, where he engaged in the mercantile and hotel business for a number of years.
The deceased was an active member of the Christian Church. He recognized Christ as his Savior while yet a youth, having lived in his Master's service for about 60 years.
The funeral was held Wednesday, July 19, at 10 o'clock from the Christian Church and was attended by a large number of friends, Rev. W. H. Harris officiating.
Interment was in the family lot in the Odd Fellows Cemetery beside the grave of his wife, who preceded him four years ago last January.
The pall bearers were Lewis Neace, W. W. Spencer, P. J. Price, J. L. Keiser, J. W. Morgan and Frank McCown.
The Rev. J. V. Crawford, of Heppner, Ore., a fellow pioneer and former pastor of the deceased, led the singing and assisted in the service.
One more of the pioneers who has helped lay the foundation of an empire has passed away, but the work accomplished and the life lived stand as a monument, sure and lasting, of the trials and hardships endured to give this generation its many advantages and comforts.
At Rest at last we lay you here
Beneath the earth's green sod.
We bury you with grief and tear,
But leave you with your God.
He, you have served through Life's long way.
Faithful to the last sleep.
To Him look now for your last repay,
Your last reward to reap.
Hard toil your lot has ever been,
Relentless in the fight
To give your life to conquer sin,
To sleep with God tonight. 
Londagin, George Washington (I34554103112)
 
7 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I201003004898)
 
8


One of the early mayors of Kansas City, Missouri (1860-61)
Professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Missouri Medical College (now Washington University Medical School, St. Louis)
Author
General on staff of General Sterling Price Confederate States of America also surgeon-general on the Confederate Army Staff, Richmond, VA. Company D, 1st Brigade, 8th Division, Captain, Wounded 8/10/61 at the Battle of Wilson's Creek

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Dr George Madison Brown Maughs moved from St Louis to Kansas City in 1858. He served as the fifth mayor of Kansas City, Missouri, in 1860 and was defeated in his run for re-election. A Southern sympathizer during the Civil War, he joined the command of Confederate General Sterling Price, served as a member of the medical examining board of the Confederate Army, and died in St Louis in 1901. An extensive article about Dr G M B Maughs is available in the Union Cemetery sexton's cottage. 
Maughs, Dr. George Madison Brown (I201001029927)
 
9


S1 US Navy Wold War II


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Obituary -
Simmie Oliver Hamilton
Graveside services for Simmie Oliver Hamilton were held on Friday, Dec. 7, at Lakeside Memorial Lawn Cemetery. The services were directed by the Miller Funeral Home. Mr. Hamilton died Dec. 3 at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center in Sacramento.
A native of Cash, Ark., he was 64 years of age. He was a Navy veteran of World War II. Mr. Hamilton was the brother of Ruth Harrel and Rubye Alexander of Arkansas, Aeiel B. Hamilton of Missouri. James 0. Hamilton of Florida, and Thelma Magie of Escondido, Calif.



Folsom Telegraph 12 Dec 1984




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27 Jan 1920 census of Little Texas (ED #46), Craighead County, AR, found the Hamilton family living in dwelling #134:

Andrew Hamilton 46 AR AR AR - Farmer
Minnie 41 AR AR AR
Ruth 18 AR AR AR
Rubbie 13 AR AR AR
Arale 11 AR AR AR
Charley 9 AR AR AR
Olin 6 AR AR AR
Thelma 4 AR AR AR
S.O. 1/12 AR AR AR


16 April 1930 census of Texas, Craighead County, AR, found the Hamilton family living in dwelling #60. Andrew and Minnie said that they were first married at ages 26 and 18 respectively:

A. J. Hamilton 63 AR AR AR - Farmer
Minnie 52 AR AR AR
Charley 16 AR AR AR
Odas 13 AR AR AR
S. O. 10 AR AR AR
Thelma 14 AR AR AR


16 April 1940 census of Jonesboro, Craighead County, AR, found the Hamilton family living in dwelling #147. They said that they lived in Craighead County, AR, on 15 April 1935:

A. J. Hamilton 66 AR - 3 years of education, Superintendent - County home, Earned $600 in past year
Minnie Hamilton 60 AR - 4 years of education
Thelma Hamilton 22 AR - Daughter, Single, 8 years of education, Asst. Superintendent - County home
S. O. Hamilton 20 AR - Son, Single, Completed 4 years of high school education, Taxicab driver, Earned $240 in past year 
Hamilton, Simmie Oliver (I34554071100)
 
10

I BECAME A TEXICAN.
By Sarah J. Kite
My father is Henry Kite and he was 16 when I was born on a frontier farm in Fayette County, Georgia. My young Mother, Sarah“Sally” Hassey died the day of my birth October 2, 1853. Caswell & Harriett Kite were my grandparents, including me in their growing family. Farming plus ranching was a part of my life and I was a happy kid and eagerly anticipated the wagon train that moved our large family and associated family into Butler County, Alabama. It was just a stop off place as all our menfolk had their sights set on the wild west.
Poppa met and married my new Momma. Winafred Williams was born 11 March 1841, here in Greenville, Butler County and Poppa married “Winny” in her father’s house on 6 July 1858. She was just turned 17 and I was 5 years old.
The family Kite/Williams grew when my Aunt Mary Francis Kite married James Jasper Williams, effectively giving me double cousins in the future. Grandpa Caswell gathered in his clan and set before them the gamble to move again, this time they all packed up, lock, stock, and barrel, our faces set to the wild west after 1860.

Just about the time we are all settled-in, the state of Texas just up left the Union and joined the war interrupting our lives, big time. Poppa Henry Kite signed up, right away and with him went my Uncle James Jasper Williams, then my Uncle Samuel (the one who married Sally Burns), Uncle Stephen who married Susan Matilda Johnson and last to join up was my Uncle David Kite who married Martha Angeline Rhymes.

Grandma Harriett told me that I would be a real Texican and when I died, I would be a ‘planted Texican’.

What a country! We breathed in the heady smell of sage and bluebonnets and land, such land, so different and new. Hard lessons and hard work around me, I had all my aunts and uncles and weddings and cousins. Those cousins came almost weekly, it seemed. Grandpa Caswell was expecting his family to populate Texas as they all spread out and made their own place. Texas is a land of emotions, fierce beauty,fierce heat, tempers and everything coated in dust. The high yellow grasses oft he valleys give way to the smokey blue pines and red oaks, creating thickets to hide cows and Indians and outlaws. Don’t forget that it grows wild grapes and wild plums that make the very best jams and jellies.
Momma told me that cattle eat mesquite beans and that people can eat them, too. Well, I gave it a try and all I can say about that is:” Leave them for the cows.” I wouldn’t cajole anyone into living in Texas. Its lonely, wild and the wind-well, that is another story. If you do not like the weather, stick around 30 minutes and it will change.

One of the new “Aunts”was Sarah Sally Burns. She was a neighbor and the place we had settled was called: Blue Branch, Burleson County. All the settling and crops were in jeopardy with the men going to war. When, I was asked about how I felt about the war, my reply was,” WE LOST”. I know what it feels like to be hungry. All those cousins had to be fed and my Grandma Harriett and Grandpa Caswell rose to the task. Still some of our families had to ask for help when the Confederates/Texas offered aid to indigent families who had soldiers in service or dead. We had our own dead, too. My grandma’s sister, Susan Kite Mulligan had a couple of little girls and her husband, Frank died in the war. Aunt Susan was around when I was born and helped her sister Harriett birth lots of babies. Grandma Harriett gave birth to her last son and last child in 1860. They named that little boy: Caswell Leroy Kite. The man I had picked out to marry went to the war, also. His name is Thomas Jackson Yarborough. One of his kin married my oldest brother, George Kite. Her name was Dixie Yarborough and they had just one girl, named: Georgia Kite and she married a Cleveland.My brother George was killed in February of 1887.

Killing, death and hanging, shoot-outs, rustlers, nothing romantic about that part of Texas. I did marry my fellow in 1873 in Milam County,Texas and birthed my children there. This is the story of my Aunt Sally Burns and her family and the reason my Grandparents pulled up stakes and moved out of Burleson County to Erath County for safety.

Texas moved its counties around almost as much as it moved its people. The farm that once was in Burleson County became Falls County and in time Lee County. All these places at one time was Milam County.

The BURNS family was in Texas before the KITE family and old man Burns was prosperous and “well thought of”.A man’s reputation was more valuable than what he owned. John H. Burns and his wife Eliza J. Burns buried a son by the name of John T.Burns, age 9, in Lee County, Beaukiss, Tx. in the BURNS CEMETERY. Children dying was far too often done. John H. Burnes was 52 years old in 1870 and born in Georgia. His wife was born in Ireland and also was 52 years old. They had three girls: Texana age 15 in 1870 and Hester age 21 and Sarah called Sally age 24 (the one who married my Uncle Samuel Kite).

(Note: A History of Lee County Vol.I, Blue Branch section-article in part below) Lexington near Giddings.)

“John Burns was an early settler in Blue and purchased some land from the Jackson family The Jackson brothers were given a land grant, by the Republic of Texas for service during the Mexican War. The buffalo poor, hungry, Indians did raid the small farms on the edge of settlements taking cattle and horses but the war had put Union Troops in Texas and that problem was pretty much solved. There was a dark era in the early history of the Blue Branch Post Office when the escapades of lawbreaking sidewinders gave the good citizens much concern. The rustler’s reign was short-lived, but five men had given their lives before they were apprehended. One of these men was Sally Burns’s father, John H.Burns.

Poppa gathered us all together in 1876 after the burial and talked to us about being careful and staying close to the house and not going out riding without some menfolk with us. The way the men were killed was just planned murder, cruel and sidewinder mean. There was a band of outlaws hanging around the community. The war taught men to fight and some men just wouldn’t give up the bloody thrill,bringing their evil into our lives. Our friends were waylaid , the cowards way of murder. They shot and killed John Burns, Pete Allen, Horace Alsup, John Bloodsworth, and Turk Turner. Some of their bodies were wrapped in newly skinned cowhides, a way of torture and killing used by renegade Indians in an attempt to put the blame on the Indians and hide the outlaw participation.

The sheriff asked forhelp from the citizens to stop the murder and thieving. A citizen’s organization was created on the spot, later spreading to Lee County, Milam, Burleson and Bastrop. These men also war trained and determined to stop the men known by the name of THE KNOB-NOTCH CUTTER’S GANG.”

After some deliberation a plan was formed. The “committee” announced to the communities that there was going to be a SHIN-DIG and it was for the public to attend.Poppa told all the family about the dance and it was decided to be at our neighbor’s house, Pete Airhardt’s place which was locally known as the old Scott place. Grandma Harriett and Sally thought it was too soon after burial of the 5 friends and all the women were in black mourning. Poppa said he wanted the older women to go-and dress for a party. The younger women and the kids had to stay home. At a given signal, the women were all to go to one room of the house and bar the door from the inside. He said they could mourn later. I wanted to go badly but John said, No. That was that.

The liquor was put in the front of the house and all the men were there, drinking, smoking and hanging around. When the music started they all went in and the women went to their room and the front door was barred on the outside-shutting in the outlaws. The Committee had quietly surrounded the house, guarding every window and door. However, one of the outlaws: Ab Kaneman, escaped through a window. Another man, Sol Wheat was not at the dance. These two high-tailed it out of the country and never returned. Four of the bad boy outlaws were caught: Young Floyd, Wade Alsup, BakeScott, and John Kirkendall.

(note: I don’t know if Wade Alsup was kin to the murdered man, Horace Alsup?)

Justice was swift. The Committee took the four bad boys and they were given a neck-tie-party and hung in the big oak tree that stands just outside our kitchen door. When, I went out the next morning to feed the calves, I was shocked to find the dead men hanging in our yard.

Looking in the Lee County Cemetery Book, Vol I. The Burns Cemetery at Blue Branch, Post Office, Texas shows that the son of John H. Burns is buried there along with three of the murders: John Kuyendall, Beck Scott, and Wade Alsup all hung on June 27, 1877. The same land holds their murdered neighbors. Young Floyd, is buried in Floyd Cemetery near the Bastrop-Lee County line.

After the killings,the Samuel Kite/ Sallie Burns family, Grandma Harriett, the widow and children of John H. Burns, Aunt Susan Mulligan and her kids and others of our Kite clan moved again, Lock, Stock and Barrel to Erath County to get out of the way of the bad element in Burleson Co. Texas. I went to Floyd County with my husband and became a planted Texican. 
Kite, Henry (I202108472512)
 
11

Jacob was a soldier in Company "K", 1st regiment Illinois volunteers, US Army, in the Mexican War.



http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=seybold&GSiman=1&GScid=108206&GRid=133638849&



21 Nov 1850 census of Township 3 South 4 West, Pike County, IL, found the Seybold family living in dwelling #1553 and #1554:

#1553:
James Seybold 48 IL Farmer
Olive 39 NY
Joseph 20 IL
Jasper 17 IL
Doctor Gate 15 IL
Gilbert 13 IL
Hannah 12 IL
Mary 10 IL
Johana 9 IL
James 8 IL
Stephen 6 IL
Samuel 4 IL
George W. 2 IL

#1554:
Eli Seybold 23 IL
Elizabeth 20 TN
Jacob 24 IL



10 June 1880 census of Pleasant Vale, Pike County, IL, found the Seybold family living in dwelling #1:

Jacob Seybold 54 IL IL IL Farmer
Nancy J. 54 MO VA VA
Jasper N. 15 IL IL MO Farm laborer 
Seybold, Jacob (I34554071928)
 
12

Lewis E. Hicks (c1839-1921) - Private, Company F, 12th Ohio Infantry Regiment· Warren County Soldiers Serving in the 12th OVI
· Warren County Soldiers Serving in the 69th OVI
· "Warren County in the War, Part IV," The Lebanon (Ohio) Gazette, Saturday, November 21, 1885
· Service Record #1 from American Civil War Research Database by Historical Data Systems
Lewis E. Hicks enlisted as a 22 year old Private on 19 Apr 1861
Mustered into Co F, 12th OVI on 4 May 1861 (3 months)
Mustered out on 18 Aug 1861
· Service Record #1 from American Civil War Research Database by Historical Data Systems
Lewis E. Hicks enlisted as a 22 year old 1st Sergeant on 12 Sep 1861
Mustered into Co A, 69th OVI on 31 Dec 1861
Promoted to 2nd Lieutenant on 31 Aug 1862
Promoted to Captain on 23 May 1863
Promoted to Major and transferred to Field & Staff on 31 May 1865
Mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky on 17 Jul 1865
· Pension Index Cards
Lewis E. Hicks filed for a pension on 11 Jul 1879 (Application #297240, Certificate #198584) for service in Co F, 12th OVI and in Co A & F&S, 69th OVI
died at Augusta, Georgia on 17 Nov 1921 
Hicks, Maj. Lewis Ezra (I200184167723)
 
13

14 Dec 1850 census of Saint Marie Precinct, Jasper County, IL, found the Miller family living in dwelling #272:

John Miller 50 OH
Mary 42 KY
William 21 IL
Thomas 16 IL
Jane 18 IL
John 13 IL
James 9 IL
Robert 1 IL


1860 Census of Willow Hill, Jasper County, IL, found the Neal family living in dwelling #1360. Next door in dwelling #1361 was Jane's father John Miller and family:

William Neal 28 KY - Farmer
Jane 28 IL
John T. 2 IL



21 July 1870 census of Willow Hill, Jasper County, Il found the Neal family living in dwelling #124. Next door was father John Miller (70) in dwelling #125:

Jane Neal 39 IL Widow, Keeping house
John 12 IL Works on farm
Martha 8 IL
Mary E. 7 IL


1880 census found Jane (48) living with son John T. Neal (22) and daughters Martha E. (18) and Mary E. (17) in dwelling #180 in Colville, Benton County, AR. This census shows that Martha is paralyzed. Neighbor in dwelling #178 was sister Belinda (Miller) Peck and family:

John T. Neal 22 IL KY IL
Jane 48 IL OH IL mother
Martha E. 18 IL KY IL sister
Mary E. 17 IL KY IL sister


9 Aug 1900 census of Webbers Falls, Cherokee Nation, OK, found Jane Neal and family living in dwelling #396:

Jane Neal 68 Jun 1831 IL OH IL widow
John T. 42 Mar 1858 IL KY IL single, Clerk - Dry Goods
Martha E. 39 Nov 1860 IL KY IL


28 April 1910 census of Webbers Falls, Muskogee County, OK, found Jane and son John living in dwelling #12 on Cotton Lane. Jane said that 2 of her 3 children were still living:

John T. Neal 52 Single IL KY IL Salesman - General store
Jane Neal 78 Widow IL OH IL 3 children, 2 living
Luticia Bias 52 Servant 
Miller, Jane (I34554068043)
 
14

15 June 1860 census of Pacific, Humboldt County, CA, found the Shaw family living in dwelling #162:

Seth L. Shaw 44 VT - Farmer
Isabella Shaw 31 NY
Stella M. Shaw 3/12 CA
Elizabeth B. Shaw 65 VT
Jane 12 CA - Indian female
Biday 6 CA - Indian female


14 July 1870 census of Pacific, Humboldt County, CA, found the Shaw family living in dwelling #177:

S. Louis Shaw 54 VT - Farmer
Isabella Shaw 42 NY
Jos Armitage Shaw 9 CA
Biddy Shaw 14 CA - Mother and father of foreign birth (probably indian)



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------In 1852 Seth Louis Shaw and his brother claimed two parcels of land on the West side of the Eel River near the present day city of Eureka. Seth Louis Shaw, in 1854, began construction of the first large house in the area and named it "Fern Dale." When it became the first post office, the new settlement also adopted the name. Today the community is one of the very best examples of Victorian style architecture in existence and there are a number of beautiful bed and breakfast inns located in the town including "Fern Dale" which is now known as "The Shaw House Bed &amp; Breakfast Inn," located at 703 Main Street. This town showplace is a notable example of Carpenter-Gothic architecture. Seth was the first justice of the peace and postmaster of Ferndale, the first Humboldt County coroner, the first master of the Masonic Lodge; and he directed the 1870 census.-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Birth: Mar., 1816
Death: Nov. 23, 1872

Headstone Inscription: Aged 56 years 8 months

In 1852 Seth Louis Shaw and his brother claimed two parcels of land on the West side of the Eel River near the present day city of Eureka. Seth Louis Shaw, in 1854, began construction of the first large house in the area and named it "Fern Dale." When it became the first post office, the new settlement also adopted the name. Today the community is one of the very best examples of Victorian style architecture in existence and there are a number of beautiful bed and breakfast inns located in the town including "Fern Dale" which is now known as "The Shaw House Bed &amp; Breakfast Inn," located at 703 Main Street. This town showplace is a notable example of Carpenter-Gothic architecture. Seth was the first justice of the peace and postmaster of Ferndale, the first Humboldt County coroner, the first master of the Masonic Lodge; and he directed the 1870 census.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&amp;GSln=shaw&amp;GSfn=seth&amp;GSbyrel=all&amp;GSdyrel=all&amp;GSst=6&amp;GScntry=4&amp;GSob=n&amp;GRid=10373134&amp;df=all&amp;


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Born near Windsor, VT in 1816. Shaw was raised on a farm and at 14 was apprenticed to a cabinetmaker. Early in life he became interested in art and became adept at portrait painting and photography. Arriving in San Francisco with the Gold Rush in 1849, he mined briefly and then opened a daguerreotype gallery in San Francisco. In 1854 he moved north to Ferndale where he established a farm, acted as postmaster, justice of the peace, and coroner. Considered the founder of Ferndale, he died there in 1872.
Bancroft Library (UC Berkeley).

http://www.askart.com/AskART/artists/biography.aspx?searchtype=BIO&amp;artist=10048971
 
Shaw, Seth Louis (I34554122241)
 
15

16 June 1900 census of Prairie Creek, Logan County, IL, found the Fink family living in dwelling #114, next door to the Rent Ontkes family in dwelling #113. John and Annie said that they had been married 57 years and 5 of their 8 children were still living. They also said that they both had immigrated to the United States in 1866:

John K. Fink 2/1825 75 Germany Germany Germany - Farmer
Annie 10/1827 72 Germany Germany Germany
Henry 1/1874 26 IL Germany Germany - Farmer-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Burial:
Hartsburg Union Cemetery
Hartsburg
Logan County
Illinois, USA 
Fink, Anna (I34554096012)
 
16

2 April 1940 census of Ukiah, Mendocino County, CA, found the Allen family living at #6 Main Street in Potter Valley. Anthony said that he lived at the same address on 15 April 1935. Dovie said that she lived in San Jose, CA, on 14 April 1935:

Antony G. Allen 45 AR - 8 years of education, Farm laborer, Earned $60 in past year
Dovie G. Allen 22 OK - 7 years of education
Betty Jean Allen 4/12 CA------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Obituary -Betty Jean Thomas
64 of West Plains
Betty Jean Thomas died peacefully at sunrise on Sunday April 25 (2004) at her home surrounded by family and friends.She was born November 15, 1939 at Visalia, Calif. Mrs. Thomas devoted her life to others and enjoyed living on Dogwood Mountain in Douglas County, Mo.She was the daughter of Anthony Graves Allen and Dovie Grace Lounsbury Allen. Mrs. Thomas was a Christian.She was preceded in death by her parents, one sister, and one brother.
She was preceded in death by her parents, one sister, and one brother.
Survivers include six children; Kathryn Jean Andrews and Mary Elaine Thomas, both of Harrison, Leasa Thomas and Harold Allen Thomas, both of West Plains, Mo., William Anthony Thomas of Carney, Okla., and Norma "Nonie" Renee Merritt of Grover Beach, Calif.; the father of her children, Harold Nathan Thomas of Carney, Okla.; 13 grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; Uncle Emmitt, Aunt Norma Lounsbury, and cousin Pat Lounsbury, all of Pismo Beach Calif.; sister-in-law, Frances Richmond of Sapulpa, Okla.; many friends including Martha Faye Williams, friend of 55 years of Omaha, Veronica Patenode, friend of 37 years of Grants Pass, Ore., Lilly Welch, friend of 13 years of West Plains, Mo., and David and Kathy Findley, friends of 11 years of Seymoure, Mo.Viewing was held Wednesday, April 28 at Robertson-Drago Funeral Home in West Plains, Mo. Graveside services were held Thursday, April 29 at the Old Methodist Cemetery in Omaha under the direction of Robertson-Drago Funeral Home. Reverend Bob Miller and wife, Susie, from Potters House Church in Omaha officiated the services.Pallbearers were son, Harold Thomas; grandsons, Jacob Thomas, Zackary Thomas, Andrew Anderson, Aaron Merritt; and step-grandson, Joshua Gatlin.John Gatlin of Harrison beautifully sang Amazing Grace. The 23 Psalm was recited by Rev. Miller and a poem written by Betty Thomas was read by Susie Miller.Per her wishes, flowers were not purchased but 121 traditional Iris were cut from her garden and lovingly draped over her casket.Contributions for funeral may be made to family members at P.O. Box 121, Harrison , Ark. 72602. Special thanks to all who joined us in celebrating our mothers life.https://bolivarmonews.com/obituaries/betty-jean-thomas/article_1dbc4a30-f542-528a-a598-cddb43e596c2.html 
Allen, Betty Jean (I34554068013)
 
17

21 June 1900 census of Grand Meadow, Minnehaha County, SD, found the Hill family living in dwelling #169. James and Ina said that they had been married 5 years and all 3 of their children were still living. Hiram and Roxana said that they had been married 43 years and all 5 of their children were still living:

James Hill 1/1868 32 IA NY VT - Farmer
Ina Hill 9/1874 25 MN
Delbert Hill 6/1896 3 SD IA MN
Ina Hill 12/1897 2 SD IA MN
Lawrence Hill 4/1899 1 SD IA MN
Hiram Hill 6/1833 66 NY - Father, Farmer
Roxana Hill 1/1832 68 VT Canada - Mother------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Hill GenealogyPosted 02 Jun 2010 by Michael Guild Hiram and his family moved from NY to Iowa in 1859 and again to the Dakota Territory in 1874. His name and record may appear on the Old Settlers Records of Sioux Falls, SD. He was a powerful skater and skated across Lake Champlain. He went to enlist in the Civil War, but they wouldn't take him, as the President had just wired that no more men would be taken from Iowa until the other states had met their quota. 
Hill, Hiram N. (I34554111447)
 
18

22 June 1900 census of Wager, Benton County, AR, found the Chenoweth family living in dwelling #247. John and Margarett said that they had been married 22 years and all 4 of their children were still living:

John Chenoweth 6/1852 47 TN TN TN - Farmer
Margrett J. 3/1855 45 MO TN TN
Joseph L. 4/1878 22 AR TN MO - Farm laborer
Nelson 10/1880 19 AR TN MO - Farm laborer
William J. 6/1884 15 AR TN MO - Farm laborer
Ida M. 1/1887 13 AR TN MO--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------AR Military Civil War: Confederacy Private in Company A of 1st Battery, Ark. Lt. Artillery Regiment, enlisted on Jan. 26, 1864, served until discharge Aug. 10, 1865. On his claim for disability, due to war injuries, he is listed as: 45 years old, 5'6" Fair complexion, dark hair, blue eyes, farmer.Oldest son of: Nelson H. and Sarah W. King ChenowethBrother of: Henry , Isaac Pierce, William, Mary Elizabeth, Joseph E., and Sarah Leona.John's first wife: Mary Elizabeth Starnes m 07 July 1869 near Hindsville, Madison Co, Ark., their daughter: Martha Adaline "Addie"John married Margaret J. "Meg" (Coker) St. John on Nov. 12, 1876 in Healing Springs, Ark.
Their children: Joseph Lester, married Iva March Garrison
Nelson E., married Eva Maude Poindexter
Jeff William, married Melvia Willie Hensley
Ida M., married William Pleas Abercrombie. Ida is buried at Thornsberry Cemetery near Tontitown.
John and his brother, Henry, ran a business together, the Chenoweth Brother's Farms.Reba Chenoweth, John's 1st granddaughter really loved him. He petted her and was so good to her. She was 10 when he died. Reba still talked about him when she was an old woman,80 years later.  
Chenoweth, John King (I34554121074)
 
19

22 June 1900 census of Wager, Benton County, AR, found the Chenoweth family living in dwelling #247. John and Margarett said that they had been married 22 years and all 4 of their children were still living:

John Chenoweth 6/1852 47 TN TN TN - Farmer
Margrett J. 3/1855 45 MO TN TN
Joseph L. 4/1878 22 AR TN MO - Farm laborer
Nelson 10/1880 19 AR TN MO - Farm laborer
William J. 6/1884 15 AR TN MO - Farm laborer
Ida M. 1/1887 13 AR TN MO



6 May 1910 census of Elm Springs, Washington County, AR, found the Abercrombie family living in dwelling #147, next door to father Benjamin Abercrombie in dwelling #148. Ples and Ida said that they had been married 3 years and 1 of their 2 children was still living:

Ples Abercrombie 26 AR GA AR - Farmer
Ida 23 AR GA AR
Evadeen 5/12 AR AR AR


9 January 1920 census of Wager, Benton County, AR, found the Abercrombie family living in dwelling #209:

Pleas Abercrombie 36 AR GA AR - Farmer
Ida Abercrombie 32 AR TN MO
Evadeen Abercrombie 5/12 AR AR AR
Margarett Chenoweth 67 MO TN MO - Mother-in-law, Widow-----------------------------------------------------------------------------Ida "Idy" Chenoweth Abercrombie was the daughter of John King Chenoweth and Margaret "Meg" St.John Chenoweth. Ida married William Plez Abercrombie on Oct. 20, 1907.Ida and Plez had 3 daughters, Cleotha, Burlin and Evadean. Little Cleotha and Burlin, born seven years apart, both died the same day that they were born, and are buried here beside their Mother.Evadean married Jim Craig and is buried at the Elm Springs Cemetry, along with Ida's grandparents, Sarah and Nelson Chenoweth, and her parents, John and Meg Chenoweth, and two of her brothers, Nelson E. and Jeff Chenoweth.Most all of the Chenoweth family is buried at Elm Springs Cemetery. Ida had 3 brothers, Joseph L. Chenoweth, Nelson E. Chenoweth, Jeff W. Chenoweth, and one half-sister, Martha Adaline "Addie" Chenoweth, and 2 half brothers, Randolf and Outon Coker.Ida was a sweet mother and wife. The family lived on a farm near Wager.Ida attended the Wager School District #90, and appeared in a school group picture for that school in 1905.Ida's daughter, EvaDean, had one son, John Will Craig. John Will had 10 children, Ida would have had 10 great grandchildren,if she'd have lived long enough to see them. Ida died at age 34. EvaDean lived to be 85 years old.This cemetery can be found off Old hwy 68, west of Tontitown. It is on Osage Creek Road. Turn off Old Hwy 68 onto Griggs Rd, going north, to Osage Creek road, turn left, the Thornsberry cemetery is up in the corner on Osage Creek road, also called County Road 88.From: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&amp;GSln=AB&amp;GSfn=i&amp;GSpartial=1&amp;GSbyrel=all&amp;GSdyrel=all&amp;GSst=4&amp;GScntry=4&amp;GSob=n&amp;GRid=29148619&amp;df=all&amp;  
Chenoweth, Ida Margaret (I34554121080)
 
20

28 April 1910 census of Santa Ana, Orange County, CA, found Mack Miller and family living in dwelling #135 on 1st Street:

Mack A. Miller 37 IL IL TN Salesman - grocery store
Stella M. 37 IL IN IL
Charles F. 8 IL IL IL
Thomas D. 6 IL IL IL-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Charles was married 10 May 1922 in Richland Co, IL to Nellie Olivia Sappenfield. They had at least 2 children: Mack Irvin (1923-1980) and Lowell Marion (1924-1990).Charles' Idaho death certificate states that his body was transferred to the Brown Colonial Mortuary in Santa Ana, California for final disposition. The death certificate also states that Charles was a Television Technician. 
Miller, Charles F. (I34554071178)
 
21

4 June 1880 census of Harrison, Boone County, AR, found the Actkinson family living in dwelling #35:

John D. Actkinson 44 TN -- -- - Farmer
Sarena Actkinson 32 TN KY IL - Wife
Sarah E. Actkinson 10 AR TN TN - Daughter
James H. Actkinson 8 AR TN TN - Son
William C. Actkinson 4 AR TN TN - Son
Paralee Actkinson 7 AR TN TN - Daughter
Jessie Actkinson 2 AR TN TN - Son
Ruth Actkinson 1/12 AR TN TN - Daughter, Born May 1880
Margaret M. Actkinson 35 AR TN TN - Sister-in-law, Widow, Boarding
Mary E. Actkinson 13 TX TN TN - DaughterSpanish American War Vet
Posted 18 Apr 2007 by bandmaster1964
William Actkinson was taken prisoner and held at El Castillo del Morro, Santiago de Cuba. Nearby was the site of the battle of San Juan Hill.-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
Actkinson, William Carroll (I34554108778)
 
22

6 Jan 1920 census of San Rafael, Marin County, CA, found the Giari family living in dwelling #46:

Fulvio Giari 38 Italy Italy Italy - Janitor, Private
Dominica 34 Italy Italy Italy
Fred 7 CA Italy Italy - Son
Suzie 14 Italy Italy Italy - Daughter
Frank 5/12 CA Italy Italy - Son


5 April 1930 census of San Rafael, Marin County, CA, found the Giari family living in dwelling #137 on "A" Street. Fulvio and Domenca said that they were first married at ages 24 and 21 respectively. Fulvio said that he had immigrated to the United States in 1906, Domenca in 1912:

Fulvio Giari 49 Italy Italy Italy - Laborer, General
Domenca 44 Italy Italy Italy
Fred V. 17 CA Italy Italy
Frank 10 CA Italy Italy
Joseph 5 CA Italy Italy
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Obituary
FRED GIARI
GIARI, Fred
Died at his home in Pasadena April 29, 2012. He was 99.
Fred was born in the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco in an apartment, upstairs from Figoni's Hardware to Fulvio and Domenica Giari on February 5, 1913. A few years later his family moved to Fairfax, then to San Rafael. He met his wife of 55 years, Maygene, while attending Stanford University in 1939. Fred and Maygene made their home in Los Angeles, moving to Pasadena in 1957.
Fred had many interests and careers. He worked as a bicycle mechanic, grocery store clerk, draftsman, NBC page, and merchant seaman. After college, he worked as a salesman for Bohemian Distributing in Los Angeles and New York. In 1947, he changed careers again, working as a personnel manager at the Southern California Gas Company. In 1959 he moved on to Tidewater Oil company, and finished his professional working life as a manager of supervisory training and development at Phillips Petroleum in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, where he retired in 1978. Upon retirement Fred and Maygene returned to their home in Pasadena. At age 74, Fred obtained his contractor's license, and spent his retirement fixing up his home, his children's homes, and various rental property. He did volunteer work at the Convalescent Aid Society in Pasadena, where he helped rebuild the office and warehouse. He enjoyed having "fix-it" projects, and maintained lasting friendships with hardware store owners and members of the building trades. Fred leaves a large circle of friends, co-workers, and family. He will be remembered as a loyal friend, a mentor and confidant, and a cheerleader and supporter for his loved ones. His wife Maygene predeceased him in 2003. He is survived by his daughter Helen Campbell [husband John] of Oakland, his son Rick [wife Sue] of Alamo, his brothers John Giari and Joe Giari of Novato, 6 grandchildren, 5 great-grandchildren, his dear friend Katherine [Tash] Livingston, as well as many beloved nieces, nephews, and cousins. A memorial was held on May 12 in Pasadena, and a family celebration of life will be held in Novato on June 9 at his brother's home. The family wishes to gratefully acknowledge the wonderful care and kindness of Yesika Benitez, Fred's caregiver. Her compassion and consideration enabled Fred to live at the home he loved with independence, safety, and dignity.
Memorial contributions can be made to the American Civil Liberties Union or to the Convalescent Aid Society in Pasadena.
Published in Pasadena Star-News on May 27, 2012
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


I'm Really Rather Fond of You

by Fred Giari

I am 97 years old, waking up each day happy to be alive, looking around for teachable moments, and always remembering theres more to life than just brushing my teeth.

Born above Figonis hardware store in North Beach of San Francisco in 1913, I grew up playing at the corner of Columbus and Broadway, with all the older Italian women standing around criticizing me and all the children. Thats my boy. He is a cockroach was the kind of thing they would say.

My family immigrated from Italy. Years later, my wife Maygene and I made a pilgrimage back to my mothers home town high up in the hill country. Every bit of the town seemed to be made from concrete with no facing materials, a very hard and poor environment. It was on this trip that we learned of the tradition of children in rural Italy assigned the task of washing the bodies when friends and relatives died. It all seemed so natural in that environment. How different things are now.

Maygene and I had an extraordinary life together. I was always the talkative one, Maygene more reflective. One evening, 40 years into our marriage, while we were enjoying that special time in the evening when the sun sets, I got up and brought Maygene her favorite cocktail. She was busy grading English papers and barely looked up. Moments later, there was a small note dropped on my lap, with her perfect penmanship: You know I am really rather fond of you. M.

Maygene always had a plan and knew what she wanted. In life and in death. As we got older, and had a few health bumps along the way, she made her end-of-life wishes clear, and not only to me. She sent a copy of her advance directives with a cover letter to the president of the local hospital! She wanted no extreme measures. She was brave in life and brave in death.

One Sunday morning at home, Maygene was struck with pain and a jolt. Not missing a beat, not changing from her pink nightgown, she asked me to drive her to the hospital. On the way, we held hands. We shared the ride in silence and in acceptance.

As soon as we arrived at the hospital, it was a noisy jumble with medical professionals helping us into the emergency room. The doctors examined Maygene and offered treatment, which she refused. They then came to ask me what I wanted to do. I fought to be as brave as Maygene and responded that I respected her wishes. I sat next to Maygene, holding hands silently, and she died peacefully.

I miss Maygene every day. And she remains a role model for me to be brave in life. And brave in death.

https://www.deathwise.org/conversations/i%E2%80%99m-really-rather-fond-of-you/
 
Giari, Fred Augustus (I34554069553)
 
23

Alma Ruth Stipe was born to Paul and Bonnie Stipe. She was the second of eight daughters and one son. In 1946 Alma left Montana to work in Spokane, Washington. She came to California in 1952.

On December 21, 1956 Alma married Maurice Nelson Davison. Alma and Maurice made their home in Berkeley, California where three children, John Lindsay, Susan Elaine, and Lyle Scott were born. The family lived in Sacramento, California and in 1967 moved to San Jose, California. In 1994, Alma and Maury moved to Coarsegold, California.

Alma passed away after a valiant struggle with cancer. She is survived by her husband, Maurice Nelson Davison of Coarsegold, California, children John Davison and wife Devon of San Diego, California, Susan Rodriguez and husband Luis of Portland, Oregon, Scott Davison and wife Veronica of Fresno, California, grandchildren Brett Rodriguez and Madeline Davison, sisters Corrine Kamp, Alice Trevithick, Leola Taylor, Esther Davison, Mary Douma, Laura Dykstra, and Barbara Bales, her brother Charles Stipe, and uncle Wesley Coleman.

Visitation and Services at Jay Chapel. Internment at Mountain View Cemetery in Ronan, Montana 
Stipe, Alma Ruth (I200152934183)
 
24

· Abraham Powell was born July 15, 1855 at Ogden, Utah to James and Jemima Wimmer Powell. James was from North Carolina and of English ancestory while Jemima's people came from Pennsylvania and was German. Abraham was the ninth child and sixth son.
Jemima always thought of him as a blessing because he was born a few years after the death of their son James. James died in 1853 after one year of life. Jemima and Abraham developed a special relationship which endured until his death. He took care of his mother and his last thoughts were of her welfare. Abraham was one year old when his father was drowned in the Weber River. Soon after the death of James, Jemima decided to take the 6 children and go to Springville to be near her parents, the Peter Wimmers. While in Springville she married Richard Williams on Mar 23, 1859. This marriage is a mystery because no one seems to know anything about it. Undoubtedly, it was of short duration. Jemima took back her Powell name. There are no known records listing her as Williams. Tyrone Powell found the Marriage record while doing research at Springville. However, after Jemima's mother died and her father remarried she moved with Abraham and Martha Ellen to Kamas. The older boys had left home by this time. Melinda had married Caleb Rhoads. Simion and John had gone to Kansas to homestead. They were both married in 1863. John built a log cabin for his mother and Abraham. Abraham idolized his brothers. They took him on their trapping and hunting excursions often. The brothers tried to take the place of Abraham's Father.
The Black Hawk War drove the family out of Kansas during 1866-67. They then moved to Pondtown, or Salem as it was later known. After arriving at Pondtown, John built 2 log houses, one for his mother and brother and one for himself and his young family. During these years Abraham became very close to his brother-in-law Caleb Rhoads who had married his sister, Malinda. Abraham with Caleb, John, and Simion spent many happy hours trapping and hunting in the mountains. These men loved the outdoors and were contented with their carefree existence. Abraham's brother Simion had been divorced from his wife, Lydia Hawley, and was living in Pondtown to be near his family. Around 1877 Abraham's sister divorced Caleb. Malinda left the area but Caleb stayed and became even closer to Abraham. Later that year while Abraham and Caleb were trapping at Castle Valley, they followed White River (Price River) down to a primitive area now known as Carbon County. They remained here for a time and built cabins in the Northwest corner of what is now Price City. As soon as the trapping season was over these hardy trappers returned to Salem. Abraham spent the next trapping season in the Nebo Mountains. Abraham had a premonition and a dream that a terrible fate awaited him.
During the cold winter months when the men of Salem couldn't farm they would travel to Mount Nebo and hunt meat for the winter. They would also cut firewood to burn in the stoves for warmth. A camping party of Abraham, his brother John, John's son Johnny Jr., Johnny's uncle Robert Snyder, and Caleb Rhoads had gone into the mountains to hunt for the winter's supply of meat and wood when the terrible catastrophe occurred. An eyewitness account of it follows at the end. As Abraham lay dying in his brother John's arms his last request was for John to take care of their mother. Abraham died December 3, 1878 and was buried in the Salem Cemetery. On Dec 14, 1893 his mother Jemima was buried beside him. His friend, hunting companion and brother John joined them December 17, 1928. In death as well as life the closeness was maintained between the brothers and their mother. In his last will and testament John made a provision for monuments and a fence to be placed on and around all 3 graves. All three sleep peacefully in the beautiful secluded Salem Cemetery waiting for the resurrection to reunite them with all their loved ones.

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rakaydance originally shared this on 18 Nov 2010


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From the Deseret News December 6, 1878
A most lamentable accident occurred on the 3rd day of the 12 month. A party of hunters consisting of John Ammon Powell (brother), Caleb B. Rhoades (brother in-law), and Robert Snyder, of this place, started on the 23rd of November, on a deer hunting expedition. They selected their hunting grounds at Nebo Creek, east of Mount Nebo. As they were gathering up their game, one of the party, Brother Abraham Powell was attacked by a grizzley bear, which lay secreted in the brush, about 10 feet off, striking him down before any defense could be made, and litterally tearing his eyes, mangling and bruising his whole body in no less then forty-seven different places, in a most fearful manner. Notwithstanding he was used in such a dreadful manner, he rallied and hollored to his brother John Ammon Powell, who was nearly three- quarters of a mile off from the scene. The latter sped to his rescue as fast as possible and carried him to camp, when he received all the care and attention that the isolated circumstances would permit; but in spite of all efforts, he expired on the morning of the 4th in severe suffering.
The deceased was a young man, aged 23; a most daring and fearless hunter. He was industerious and of exemplary habits, a quiet and peaceable disposition, dutiful and kind to his mother. He was the son of the late James Powell, so well know in the Missouri persecutions, and Mrs. Jemima Powell, an aged lady, who lives to mourn his loss. His comrades, at his request, ordained him to the priesthood of and Elder, and dedicated him to the Lord, after which he expired, uttering his last words, "Take care of mother."
The funeral services will take place tomorrow at the residence of this brother, John Ammon Powell, in this town. 
Powell, Abraham (I200097543041)
 
25

· Birth: 1818
Kentucky, USA
Death: Oct 13, 1862, Cooke County, Texas, USA


Rama (Ramey) Edward Dye was the son of Fauntleroy Dye & Elizabeth Young; he had the following siblings: James, Jacob, Barah Barthenia, Mildred, Bachen (Boucher), Lucinda, Fauntleroy, Rachel & Mary "Polly" Dye.

He married on 16 Jan 1842 in Monroe, MO, (1) Sarah Jane Bradley b. abt 1824 in MO, daughter of Benjamin Bradley & Margaret Campbell; Sarah & Rama had the following children: James, Margaret E., Rachel, & Thomas Dye.

He married (2) Mary Ann Dawson in Cooke Co., TX, on June 27, 1861; she was the daughter of Arphax R. Dawson and Jane (Unknown)(or Mary Horn); no children.

Rama Dye gave land to be used for a school house to Cooke Co., TX, Nov. 7, 1856; he and Sarah Jane, his wife, late of the state of TX and Co. of Cooke, now of Monroe Co., and Benjamin Bradley (her father) of Monroe Co., Bought land in Monroe Co. for $400 on Nov. 4, 1850, and Cooke Co., TX, records show Ramy Dye sold 320 acres to J. B. & R. H. Ruryear (Puryear?) on July 26, 1862. [Source: http://awt.ancestry.com, corder@msn.com]

He was hung as a Union sympathizer during the "Great Hangings at Gainsville."

Family links:
Children:
Margaret Elizabeth Dye Bullard (1844 - 1939)*

*Point here for explanation
Burial:
Dye Cemetery
Whitesboro
Grayson County
Texas, USAStory by Alice Hewitt Preston
· Great Hanging at Gainesville - SourcesPosted 08 Mar 2012 by ebullard132
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· To read more about the Great Hanging, go to:
The Handbook of Texas Online has an article on the Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas 1862.Following is a link to the article: www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/GG/jig1.html
Also the following related articles can be found on The Handbook of Texas Online:
Unionism http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/UU/mzu1.html
Lynching http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/LL/jgl1.html
Thomas C. Barrett http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/BB/fba83.html
This article is from W.T. Block on TexasEscapes.com. Texas Escapes Online Magazine; "Cannonball's Tales" by W.T. Block, Jr., December 1, 2006 column http://www.texasescapes.com/WTBlock/Hangings-at-Gainesville-Texas-1862.htm
A Blog on the Gainesville Hanging:
http://gainesvilletx1862.blogspot.com/

A great website with a list of books and articles on Cooke County, Texas. Many of the articles contain information about the Great Hanging. An index to the site can be found the Cooke County Genforum.com message board.
The Genforum.com post states that "The follow-up posts will contain links to articles/books scanned and put online for everyone to read/print."

http://genforum.genealogy.com/tx/cooke/messages/1667.html

You can also get to the list of books and articles by going directly to the Ware's of Woodbine website:
http://waresofwoodbine.envy.nu/pic4.html

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· Gainesville Hanging Newspaper IllustrationsPosted 02 Sep 2012 by ebullard132To see illustrations of the Gainesville hangings go to Gainesville, Texas 1862 Blog: www.gainesvilletx1862.blogspot.com
Bringing in Union Men. The illustration link below is from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 20 Feb 1864 and is entitled "Bringing in Union Men." On the night of 30 September 1862, men surrounded the homes of suspected unionists and at daybreak on October 1st the unionists were arrested. According to Barrett, "the heaviest rains I ever saw" started and the arrests took place in the pouring rain.
http://gainesvilletx1862.blogspot.com/2008/06/bringing-in-union-men.html
HANGING OF UNION MEN. The illustration link below is for an illustration of the Hanging from the Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 20 Feb 1864. Several smaller illustrations comprised a doublepage centerfold, about 22X16 in size and entitled "Rebel Barbarities in Texas." This illustration was in the center of the page and called, "Hanging of 30 Union Men," which depicted the Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas.
http://gainesvilletx1862.blogspot.com/2008/05/frank-leslies-illustrated-newspaper-20.html
To see a picture of the complete illustration from the Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 20 Feb 1864 go to the Fold3.com link below: http://www.fold3.com/image/#52160008


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· Rama Dye Performs Marriage (Goodnight to Turner)Posted 09 Dec 2012 by ebullard132Source: George W. Turner & Sarah Frances Goodnight, Marriage Return, July 14, 1855, Vol., 1, Number 36: 18, County Clerk's Office, Cooke County, Texas.
Rama Dye performed the marriage of his neice, Sarah Francis Goodnight, to George W. TURNER on 18 January 1855 in Cooke County, Texas.


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Story of Rama (Ramey) Edward Dye on Findagrave Site.


ebullard132ebullard132 originally shared this on14 Feb 2010
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Comments 
Dye, Rama Edward (I202097739461)
 
26

Born to parents of French Canadian descent, Erma was the fifth of nine children born to Elise Elizabeth Hamel (Mrs. Louis Gonzague Gagnon). Her first language was French which the family spoke at home. However, as her siblings began school, English became the spoken language. Erma was a tom boy, and preferred working in the wheat fields with her brothers rather than joining her sisters doing housework. She even took flying lessons with her brothers. 
Gagnon, Erma Bernice (I200151870517)
 
27

CPL US ARMY WORLD WAR II



9 April 1930 census of Spokane, Spokane County, WA, found the Coldeen family living in dwelling #160. Paul and Hassel said that they were first married at ages 22 and 20 respectively:

Paul C. Coldeen 29 MN Sweden Sweden - Checker, Auto freight
Hassel 27 IN OH OH
Robert Lee 5 WA MN IN
Paul Jr. 4 2/12 WA MN IN



19 April 1940 census of Spokane, Spokane County, WA, found the Coldeen family living in dwelling #362. They said that they lived at the same place on 15 April 1935:

Paul E. Coldeen 39 MN - Completed 2 years of high school education, Storekeeper - U.S. Forest Service, Earned $1080 in past year
Hassel I. Coldeen 36 IN - Completed 2 years of high school education, Elevator operator - Department store, Earned $660 in past year
Robert L. Coldeen 15 WA - 8 years of education, Paper carrier - Daily news paper, Earned $36 in past year




This may be his son, Robert Coldeen: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BG6cE0mRli8 
Coldeen, Sr. Robert Lee Sr (I34554126823)
 
28

Daniel Guffey married Ellen Smith Dillard and they lived in North Vincents. He helped build a Methodist Church at Wauneta, Kansas. A Pastor came to Caney and they went to live with the Pastor, their old friend from Wauneta. Later they moved to Arkansas where some of his brothers lived. There Daniel went blind and grandma walked with a cane and the Guffeys said she was mean to him and hit him with her cane, so probably around 1917 or 1918 they moved him back to Caney and grandma went to live with her daughter, Della, who may at that time have lived in Chandler, Oklahoma. Later she moved to Stroud, Oklahoma. I suppose that grandma may have died in one of those places.
Daniel Guffey built a rock house east of Sedan Cemetery about 1900 and Vaughn and his family lived in this house when the children were young. A picture taken on Guffeys 80th birthday (around 1908) included Vaughn Smith and Jake Smith so it is possible that they married between 1900 and 1908.
He was 91 years old when he died so would have been born about 1828 (The Smith children said he was very good to grandma).
From Bethel Rose Hamlin 
Collins, Melinda Ellen (I200052373845)
 
29

David was the son of Jacob HUFFORD Sr. and Elizabeth Ann ALLEN.

He married twice. His first wife was Mary MORRIS, with whom he had seven children: Walter Sylvester, David, Elizabeth, Ida Rose, William, Frank L., and George Washington.

After his first wife died, he secondly married Mary MELCHER, with whom he had six children: Mary, Catharine, Melvina, David Fred, Tessie, and Mantie E. 
Hufford, David Fredrick Sr (I34554115948)
 
30

Death in the oil fields
30 Oct 1919
Crawford County, Illinois
From the Robinson Constitution, Crawford County, Illinois




BURNAS MEWMAW KILLED IN WYOMING
Crawford County young man killed in oil fields there
Everett Mewmaw, residing on a rural route near Robinson, is in receipt of a telegram from Parkerton, Wyo. conveying the sad intelligence of the death of his son Burnas. The young man who had an active part in the world war, serving in the navy and later enlisting in the army, was accidentally killed while working in the oil fields of Parkerton, but no particulars of the accident were given. The body is being shipped here for burial and the remains are being accompanied by a young man friend of the dead man. 
Mewmaw, Burnas Ambrose (I202031387396)
 
31

Dr. Charles Dill Hospital on the corner of North Rail Street & North Apple Street in Shoshone, Idaho was built in 1915. This was the second Dill Hospital after the first one on the south side of town burned down. Doctor Dill developed the vaccination for the Rocky Mountain spotted fever which was so prevalent in Idaho in the early days. 
Dill, Dr. Charles William (I200187816066)
 
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FRANK L. HUFFORD.—One of the old-time settlers in the vicinity of Orick, Cal., Frank L. Hufford has made for himself a reputation there as an enterprising business man, and liberal and active in the furthering of any project for the betterment of the community where he resides. Mr. Hufford is truly a native son of California, having been born in Contra Costa county, this state, November 24, 1866, the son of David Hufford, a native of the state of Ohio, and grandson of David Hufford, a pioneer of this state who came from Ohio across the plains in 1852, and made his home in Butte county, where his death occurred. The father of Mr. Hufford was a cooper by trade, who made the journey to California in 1849, three years earlier than his father, and followed mining in the Sierras, in which occupation he attained a good measure of success. Later he bought land and improved a farm in Contra Costa county, where he was the owner of about seven hundred acres of property whereon he raised wheat and
grapes. In 1877 he removed to Humboldt county, locating for one year at Gold Bluff, near where the town of Orick is now, going thence to Trinidad, in the same county, where he bought twenty acres of land, selling the same after four years and locating at Arcata, where he became the owner of sixty acres, which property likewise he sold, removing to Alliance and thence again to Arcata, where he died at the age of seventy-seven years. In 1888 he made butter kegs for Griffin & Swan at Gold Bluff (now Orick), for the shipping of their butter to the San Francisco market.

Of the five children by David Hufford's first marriage, his son Frank was the fourth in age, his mother dying when he was only three years old, his brothers and sisters being: Walter, an attorney-at-law, who now lives in Oregon; Lydia*, now Mrs. Sweem, of Stockton, Cal.; Rosa, now Mrs. Ferril; and George, who resides at Bridgeville, Cal. By the father's second marriage, there were four other children. Frank L. Hufford grew up on his father's farm. He was deprived of school advantages, but by self-study and observation he has become a well-informed man, possessed of noteworthy business acumen. At the age of eleven years he moved with his family to Humboldt county, where he assisted his father in his work, also being employed on a dairy in Orick for five years and working in the woods for four years. In 1897 Mr. Hufford started to work independently, renting a ranch from Peter Hansen where he conducted a dairy for three years. His wife received from her father's estate eighty acres of wild land, at the mouth of Redwood creek, two miles from Orick, which Mr. Hufford improved. He also took up a homestead of one hundred sixty acres within one-fourth miles, to which he added by a purchase, thirty-eight acres more, thus becoming the owner of two hundred seventy acres in all, upon which he engaged in the dairy business and the raising of stock. Mr. Hufford was likewise employed for six or seven years in hauling freight from Bald Hills to Areata with a six-horse team, and he has been for the past eighteen years overseer of roads in District No. 5, which comprised the country for fifteen miles around Orick, also being school trustee of the same town for a period of time, in all amounting to sixteen years. In his political interests he is a member of the Republican party. Mr. Hufford's first marriage was to Miss Ella Montgomery, a native of Humboldt county, who died leaving him two children: Floyd, of Bridgeville, this county, and Mrs. Josephine Gallon, of Clinton, Mo.

The second marriage of Mr. Hufford, to Miss Myr Griffin, took place at Eureka, June 18, 1892. Like himself, his wife is a native of California, having been born at the mouth of Redwood creek, near the present town of Orick, her father, George Griffin, having been a native of Pennsylvania, who came to this state as a pioneer. After being engaged in gold mining at Gold Bluff for a time Mr. Griffin took up land on Redwood creek, where he also followed mining, later engaging in the dairy business upon his ranch, and afterwards taking Robert Swan into partnership, living here until his death occurred; and here his daughter, later Mrs. Hufford, was brought up. Mr. and Mrs. Hufford became the parents of seven children: Ida; Blanche, wife of John Francis, a farmer living near the mouth of Redwood creek; Vina, Walter, Leslie, Elmer and Kenneth, all of whom, with the exception of Mrs. Francis, make their home with their parents in Orick. Mr. Hufford has built a five-thousand-foot sawmill on his property, where he engages in the manufacture of lumber, and also runs a blacksmith shop on the place.
He also engaged in mining near Gold Bluff, where he owns one hundred fifty acres, with an ocean front of three-fourths mile, and is extracting gold from the black sand on the beach. By his business enterprises and publicspirited acts Mr. Hufford has won a high place in the esteem of all who know him. He attributes no small degree of his success to his wife, who by her aid and encouragement has been an able help meet in his different enterprises.

* Lydia is actually Minerva Elizabeth Hufford (m. William Franklin Sweem, divorced, m. William Hazen Tupen).

Source: pages 1147-1149, History of Humboldt County by Leigh H. Irvine, published by the Historic Record Company, Los Angeles, 1915. 
Hufford, Frank Leslie (I200152437341)
 
33

Granbury News March 2, 1899 page 8

A.J. Dodson has been very sick for some time, and his friends have had small hopes of recovery,

but his condition was improved yesterday morning.


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Granbury News March 23, 1899 page 8
Mr. A.J. Dodson died at his home in Grandbury last Monday, after a long illness from softening of the brain, and on Tuesday was buried with Masonic honors. Deceased was nearly 70 years of age and had spent more than half his life in Hood county, having resided in Grandbury about fifteen years. Mr. Dodson stood high among his fellow citizens and had held the office of constable here for several years. His family have the sympathy of alol in their great loss. 
Dodson, Andrew Jackson (I200104735908)
 
34

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=warner&GSiman=1&GScid=94948&GRid=28741194&



12 October 1850 census of Chester, Eaton County, MI, found the Warner family living in dwelling #1239:

John Warner 36 NY - Farmer
Eliza 33 NY
George 13 MI
Theron 10 MI
Mary 8 MI
Hannah 6 MI
Albert 4 MI
Charles 1 MI


3 July 1860 census of Marshall, Marshall County, IA, found the Warner family living in dwelling #577:

John Warner 47 NY - Farmer
Eliza 44 NY
Hiram 20 MI - Brickmaker
Hannah 16 MI
Albert 14 MI
Charles 12 MI
John Jr. 6 MI
Eugene 4 MI
Louisa 2 IA


29 July 1870 census of Eight Mile Grove, Cass County, NE, found the Warner family living in dwelling #87, next to the West family in dwelling #84:

Theodore Warner 28 MI - Farmer
Caroline 20 IL
Lilly 5 IL
Elmore 4 IL
Melvin 4/12 NE - Born Feb 1870
John Warner 17 MI - Laborer
Charles Warner 21 MI - Laborer


16 June 1880 census of Delaware, Polk County, IA, found the Warner family living in dwelling #42:

Thomas Warner 39 MI - Farmer
Caraline 33 OH
Lorin L. 13 MI
Melvin 9 IA
Minnie 7 NE
Abert 5 IA
Fred 6/12 IA 
Warner, Theron Henry (I34554088306)
 
35

I BECAME A TEXICAN.
My father is Henry Kite and he was 16 when I was born on a frontier farm in Fayette County, Georgia. My young Mother, Sarah“Sally” Hassey died the day of my birth October 2, 1853. Caswell & Harriett Kite were my grandparents, including me in their growing family. Farming plus ranching was a part of my life and I was a happy kid and eagerly anticipated the wagon train that moved our large family and associated family into Butler County, Alabama. It was just a stop off place as all our menfolk had their sights set on the wild west.
Poppa met and married my new Momma. Winafred Williams was born 11 March 1841, here in Greenville, Butler County and Poppa married “Winny” in her father’s house on 6 July 1858. She was just turned 17 and I was 5 years old.
The family Kite/Williams grew when my Aunt Mary Francis Kite married James Jasper Williams, effectively giving me double cousins in the future. Grandpa Caswell gathered in his clan and set before them the gamble to move again, this time they all packed up, lock, stock, and barrel, our faces set to the wild west after 1860.
Just about the time we are all settled-in, the state of Texas just up left the Union and joined the war interrupting our lives, big time. Poppa Henry Kite signed up, right away and with him went my Uncle James Jasper Williams, then my Uncle Samuel (the one who married Sally Burns), Uncle Stephen who married Susan Matilda Johnson and last to join up was my Uncle David Kite who married Martha Angeline Rhymes.
Grandma Harriett told me that I would be a real Texican and when I died, I would be a ‘planted Texican’.
What a country! We breathed in the heady smell of sage and bluebonnets and land, such land, so different and new. Hard lessons and hard work around me, I had all my aunts and uncles and weddings and cousins. Those cousins came almost weekly, it seemed. Grandpa Caswell was expecting his family to populate Texas as they all spread out and made their own place. Texas is a land of emotions, fierce beauty,fierce heat, tempers and everything coated in dust. The high yellow grasses oft he valleys give way to the smokey blue pines and red oaks, creating thickets to hide cows and Indians and outlaws. Don’t forget that it grows wild grapes and wild plums that make the very best jams and jellies.
Momma told me that cattle eat mesquite beans and that people can eat them, too. Well, I gave it a try and all I can say about that is:” Leave them for the cows.” I wouldn’t cajole anyone into living in Texas. Its lonely, wild and the wind-well, that is another story. If you do not like the weather, stick around 30 minutes and it will change.
One of the new “Aunts”was Sarah Sally Burns. She was a neighbor and the place we had settled was called: Blue Branch, Burleson County. All the settling and crops were in jeopardy with the men going to war. When, I was asked about how I felt about the war, my reply was,” WE LOST”. I know what it feels like to be hungry. All those cousins had to be fed and my Grandma Harriett and Grandpa Caswell rose to the task. Still some of our families had to ask for help when the Confederates/Texas offered aid to indigent families who had soldiers in service or dead. We had our own dead, too. My grandma’s sister, Susan Kite Mulligan had a couple of little girls and her husband, Frank died in the war. Aunt Susan was around when I was born and helped her sister Harriett birth lots of babies. Grandma Harriett gave birth to her last son and last child in 1860. They named that little boy: Caswell Leroy Kite. The man I had picked out to marry went to the war, also. His name is Thomas Jackson Yarborough. One of his kin married my oldest brother, George Kite. Her name was Dixie Yarborough and they had just one girl, named: Georgia Kite and she married a Cleveland.My brother George was killed in February of 1887.
Killing, death and hanging, shoot-outs, rustlers, nothing romantic about that part of Texas. I did marry my fellow in 1873 in Milam County,Texas and birthed my children there. This is the story of my Aunt Sally Burns and her family and the reason my Grandparents pulled up stakes and moved out of Burleson County to Erath County for safety.
Texas moved its counties around almost as much as it moved its people. The farm that once was in Burleson County became Falls County and in time Lee County. All these places at one time was Milam County.
The BURNS family was in Texas before the KITE family and old man Burns was prosperous and “well thought of”.A man’s reputation was more valuable than what he owned. John H. Burns and his wife Eliza J. Burns buried a son by the name of John T.Burns, age 9, in Lee County, Beaukiss, Tx. in the BURNS CEMETERY. Children dying was far too often done. John H. Burnes was 52 years old in 1870 and born in Georgia. His wife was born in Ireland and also was 52 years old. They had three girls: Texana age 15 in 1870 and Hester age 21 and Sarah called Sally age 24 (the one who married my Uncle Samuel Kite).
(Note: A History of Lee County Vol.I, Blue Branch section-article in part below) Lexington near Giddings.)
“John Burns was an early settler in Blue and purchased some land from the Jackson family The Jackson brothers were given a land grant, by the Republic of Texas for service during the Mexican War. The buffalo poor, hungry, Indians did raid the small farms on the edge of settlements taking cattle and horses but the war had put Union Troops in Texas and that problem was pretty much solved. There was a dark era in the early history of the Blue Branch Post Office when the escapades of lawbreaking sidewinders gave the good citizens much concern. The rustler’s reign was short-lived, but five men had given their lives before they were apprehended. One of these men was Sally Burns’s father, John H.Burns.
Poppa gathered us all together in 1876 after the burial and talked to us about being careful and staying close to the house and not going out riding without some menfolk with us. The way the men were killed was just planned murder, cruel and sidewinder mean. There was a band of outlaws hanging around the community. The war taught men to fight and some men just wouldn’t give up the bloody thrill,bringing their evil into our lives. Our friends were waylaid , the cowards way of murder. They shot and killed John Burns, Pete Allen, Horace Alsup, John Bloodsworth, and Turk Turner. Some of their bodies were wrapped in newly skinned cowhides, a way of torture and killing used by renegade Indians in an attempt to put the blame on the Indians and hide the outlaw participation.
The sheriff asked forhelp from the citizens to stop the murder and thieving. A citizen’s organization was created on the spot, later spreading to Lee County, Milam, Burleson and Bastrop. These men also war trained and determined to stop the men known by the name of THE KNOB-NOTCH CUTTER’S GANG.”
After some deliberation a plan was formed. The “committee” announced to the communities that there was going to be a SHIN-DIG and it was for the public to attend.Poppa told all the family about the dance and it was decided to be at our neighbor’s house, Pete Airhardt’s place which was locally known as the old Scott place. Grandma Harriett and Sally thought it was too soon after burial of the 5 friends and all the women were in black mourning. Poppa said he wanted the older women to go-and dress for a party. The younger women and the kids had to stay home. At a given signal, the women were all to go to one room of the house and bar the door from the inside. He said they could mourn later. I wanted to go badly but John said, No. That was that.
The liquor was put in the front of the house and all the men were there, drinking, smoking and hanging around. When the music started they all went in and the women went to their room and the front door was barred on the outside-shutting in the outlaws. The Committee had quietly surrounded the house, guarding every window and door. However, one of the outlaws: Ab Kaneman, escaped through a window. Another man, Sol Wheat was not at the dance. These two high-tailed it out of the country and never returned. Four of the bad boy outlaws were caught: Young Floyd, Wade Alsup, BakeScott, and John Kirkendall.
(note: I don’t know if Wade Alsup was kin to the murdered man, Horace Alsup?)
Justice was swift. The Committee took the four bad boys and they were given a neck-tie-party and hung in the big oak tree that stands just outside our kitchen door. When, I went out the next morning to feed the calves, I was shocked to find the dead men hanging in our yard.
Looking in the Lee County Cemetery Book, Vol I. The Burns Cemetery at Blue Branch, Post Office, Texas shows that the son of John H. Burns is buried there along with three of the murders: John Kuyendall, Beck Scott, and Wade Alsup all hung on June 27, 1877. The same land holds their murdered neighbors. Young Floyd, is buried in Floyd Cemetery near the Bastrop-Lee County line.
After the killings, the Samuel Kite/ Sallie Burns family, Grandma Harriett, the widow and children of John H. Burns, Aunt Susan Mulligan and her kids and others of our Kite clan moved again, Lock, Stock and Barrel to Erath County to get out of the way of the bad element in Burleson Co. Texas. I went to Floyd County with my husband and became a planted Texican. 
Williams, Margaret Winifred "Winnie" (I202108902727)
 
36

In the middle of the nineteenth century the Jacob Wilkin and George Henry families homesteaded farms in Crawford County Illinois. Silas Wilkin married Eliza Jane Henry Wilkin and lived on the farm where the Oblong Baptist Church and the Wilkin Cemetery are located.
In 1876, Andrew Weir and mary Wiman Weir brought their family from Indiana to homestead a farm next to the Wilkin farm in Crawford County, Illinois. His sons, John and L.J. (ages 7 and 9) walked beside the wagon to "lighten the load".
Silas and Jane Wilkin had two daughters (Almeda and Fannie). Andrew and Mary Weir had 3 sons and 2 daughters (John, L.J., Silas, Jane and Martha). John and L.J. courted and then married Almeda and Fannie. DUring the courtship, Almeda told her father, Silas Wilkin, that she wished there was a church nearby that would not be locked where the young people could meet for fellowship and prayer in the evenings. Her father challenged, "If you want a church, build it. I will give you the lumber and other materials you need."
Almeda and Fannie were joined by other Weir, Wilkin, and Henry children, living in the area at that time, and they built the Oblong Baptist church in 1891 on the corner 4 acres of the Silas Wilkin farm. Almeda was married to John Weir in the church in 1892. A year later Fannie married L.J. Weir in the same church.
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Henry Family History -
Prior to the year 1700 there lived, along the upper Rhine Valley in Germany, a great number of sturdy inhabitants known as German Lutherans. At this time great religious wars were being carried on by Louis XIV of France who, as a Catholic leader, felt called upon to discourage this new faith or even exterminate the people themselves. The result of this religious conflict was that these people were reduced to extreme poverty. Many of them went down the Rhine, crossed over into Scotland and Ireland and later on, crossed to Virginia and Pennsylvania. Among those who came this route were the ancestors of Patrick Henry, the famous orator of the Revolutionary period. William Penn had already established the Colony of Pennsylvania and was anxious to obtain good settlers for his colony. He made a visit to the Rhine Valley are urged the persecuted people to come directly to Pennsylvania where great opportunity awaited them. As a result many of these German people came to America and settled in southeastern Pennsylvania along the Delaware and Susquehanna rivers at Philadelphia, Germantown and Lancaster. These extensive settlements tried to keep the native language, but mingling with the English and other settlers, their German became quite modified and neighbors spoke of the as Pennsylvania Dutch.

After the Revolutionary War, when the West was opened up as the Northwest Territory, a great Westward migration into Ohio took place. Some traveled by wagon, some on horseback and some by boat down the Ohio river to Marietta. Among these who came was John Henry. He and his wife traveled on horseback, with their few possessions, from Lancaster Pennsylvania to Perry County, Ohio, where they settled on a farm near New Lexington. Here he farmed and also held the office of judge while he and his wife raised a family of five boys, one of whom was George Henry. George Henry (1807-1876) was born in Perry County Ohio where he and his wife, Anna Rarick, were successful in accumulating a comfortable living by farming and blacksmithing. After the death of the first wife, Anna Rarick Henry,George Henry married France Immel (1827-1908).
By this time land prices in Ohio had increased so much that the family decided to go farther west. From Perry County Ohio, they cam by wagons to the area around Peopria, Illinois, then southward to settle in Crawford County among others who had migrated from Ohio.
G.H. Henry, Historian, September 25, 1930 
Henry, George (I202031568704)
 
37

Information about Caswell & first wife Harriett....... His 2nd wife was Susan - Susan and Harriett were sisters and are both Caswell's first cousins.

Harriett (Kite)Kite and her husband *Caswell Kite. They were cousins - her father was David Kite and his father was Samuel Kite. The picture was printed in a book by Merle Kite Dorius of Utah, and that is where it was scanned for use by the Kite family.
*Note: Caswell Kite has his name on dozens of legal papers and it is ALWAYS just CASWELL KITE. He is not named George Caswell or David Caswell or any combination as per basic actual documents. Sons and grandsons were and are named all combinations and have caused confusion within families because of the plethora of Caswell name combinations.Harriett Kite Kite born November 8, 1818, in Fayette, Georgia. She died and is buried in Erath County, TX, 26 March 1878, Dublin city, Barbee Cemetery, and has a marker stone.
Caswell Kite was born 4 August 1811 in, possibly, Pitt Co, North Carolina, and death was 14 March 1897, thought to be in Falls Co, TX, where his land was located, and a family letter says that he was drowned. (The Brazos River is by his land and floods often.) Many say he is buried in Erath, Barbee Cemetery, but he is not on any list or in any unmarked grave near or in the same cemetery as his wife and children - or any cemetery at all in Erath Co, TX. His grave or burial is unknown.




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I BECAME A TEXICAN.
My father is Henry Kite and he was 16 when I was born on a frontier farm in Fayette County, Georgia. My young Mother, Sarah“Sally” Hassey died the day of my birth October 2, 1853. Caswell & Harriett Kite were my grandparents, including me in their growing family. Farming plus ranching was a part of my life and I was a happy kid and eagerly anticipated the wagon train that moved our large family and associated family into Butler County, Alabama. It was just a stop off place as all our menfolk had their sights set on the wild west.
Poppa met and married my new Momma. Winafred Williams was born 11 March 1841, here in Greenville, Butler County and Poppa married “Winny” in her father’s house on 6 July 1858. She was just turned 17 and I was 5 years old.
The family Kite/Williams grew when my Aunt Mary Francis Kite married James Jasper Williams, effectively giving me double cousins in the future. Grandpa Caswell gathered in his clan and set before them the gamble to move again, this time they all packed up, lock, stock, and barrel, our faces set to the wild west after 1860.

Just about the time we are all settled-in, the state of Texas just up left the Union and joined the war interrupting our lives, big time. Poppa Henry Kite signed up, right away and with him went my Uncle James Jasper Williams, then my Uncle Samuel (the one who married Sally Burns), Uncle Stephen who married Susan Matilda Johnson and last to join up was my Uncle David Kite who married Martha Angeline Rhymes.

Grandma Harriett told me that I would be a real Texican and when I died, I would be a ‘planted Texican’.

What a country! We breathed in the heady smell of sage and bluebonnets and land, such land, so different and new. Hard lessons and hard work around me, I had all my aunts and uncles and weddings and cousins. Those cousins came almost weekly, it seemed. Grandpa Caswell was expecting his family to populate Texas as they all spread out and made their own place. Texas is a land of emotions, fierce beauty,fierce heat, tempers and everything coated in dust. The high yellow grasses oft he valleys give way to the smokey blue pines and red oaks, creating thickets to hide cows and Indians and outlaws. Don’t forget that it grows wild grapes and wild plums that make the very best jams and jellies.
Momma told me that cattle eat mesquite beans and that people can eat them, too. Well, I gave it a try and all I can say about that is:” Leave them for the cows.” I wouldn’t cajole anyone into living in Texas. Its lonely, wild and the wind-well, that is another story. If you do not like the weather, stick around 30 minutes and it will change.

One of the new “Aunts”was Sarah Sally Burns. She was a neighbor and the place we had settled was called: Blue Branch, Burleson County. All the settling and crops were in jeopardy with the men going to war. When, I was asked about how I felt about the war, my reply was,” WE LOST”. I know what it feels like to be hungry. All those cousins had to be fed and my Grandma Harriett and Grandpa Caswell rose to the task. Still some of our families had to ask for help when the Confederates/Texas offered aid to indigent families who had soldiers in service or dead. We had our own dead, too. My grandma’s sister, Susan Kite Mulligan had a couple of little girls and her husband, Frank died in the war. Aunt Susan was around when I was born and helped her sister Harriett birth lots of babies. Grandma Harriett gave birth to her last son and last child in 1860. They named that little boy: Caswell Leroy Kite. The man I had picked out to marry went to the war, also. His name is Thomas Jackson Yarborough. One of his kin married my oldest brother, George Kite. Her name was Dixie Yarborough and they had just one girl, named: Georgia Kite and she married a Cleveland.My brother George was killed in February of 1887.

Killing, death and hanging, shoot-outs, rustlers, nothing romantic about that part of Texas. I did marry my fellow in 1873 in Milam County,Texas and birthed my children there. This is the story of my Aunt Sally Burns and her family and the reason my Grandparents pulled up stakes and moved out of Burleson County to Erath County for safety.

Texas moved its counties around almost as much as it moved its people. The farm that once was in Burleson County became Falls County and in time Lee County. All these places at one time was Milam County.

The BURNS family was in Texas before the KITE family and old man Burns was prosperous and “well thought of”.A man’s reputation was more valuable than what he owned. John H. Burns and his wife Eliza J. Burns buried a son by the name of John T.Burns, age 9, in Lee County, Beaukiss, Tx. in the BURNS CEMETERY. Children dying was far too often done. John H. Burnes was 52 years old in 1870 and born in Georgia. His wife was born in Ireland and also was 52 years old. They had three girls: Texana age 15 in 1870 and Hester age 21 and Sarah called Sally age 24 (the one who married my Uncle Samuel Kite).

(Note: A History of Lee County Vol.I, Blue Branch section-article in part below) Lexington near Giddings.)

“John Burns was an early settler in Blue and purchased some land from the Jackson family The Jackson brothers were given a land grant, by the Republic of Texas for service during the Mexican War. The buffalo poor, hungry, Indians did raid the small farms on the edge of settlements taking cattle and horses but the war had put Union Troops in Texas and that problem was pretty much solved. There was a dark era in the early history of the Blue Branch Post Office when the escapades of lawbreaking sidewinders gave the good citizens much concern. The rustler’s reign was short-lived, but five men had given their lives before they were apprehended. One of these men was Sally Burns’s father, John H.Burns.

Poppa gathered us all together in 1876 after the burial and talked to us about being careful and staying close to the house and not going out riding without some menfolk with us. The way the men were killed was just planned murder, cruel and sidewinder mean. There was a band of outlaws hanging around the community. The war taught men to fight and some men just wouldn’t give up the bloody thrill,bringing their evil into our lives. Our friends were waylaid , the cowards way of murder. They shot and killed John Burns, Pete Allen, Horace Alsup, John Bloodsworth, and Turk Turner. Some of their bodies were wrapped in newly skinned cowhides, a way of torture and killing used by renegade Indians in an attempt to put the blame on the Indians and hide the outlaw participation.

The sheriff asked forhelp from the citizens to stop the murder and thieving. A citizen’s organization was created on the spot, later spreading to Lee County, Milam, Burleson and Bastrop. These men also war trained and determined to stop the men known by the name of THE KNOB-NOTCH CUTTER’S GANG.”

After some deliberation a plan was formed. The “committee” announced to the communities that there was going to be a SHIN-DIG and it was for the public to attend.Poppa told all the family about the dance and it was decided to be at our neighbor’s house, Pete Airhardt’s place which was locally known as the old Scott place. Grandma Harriett and Sally thought it was too soon after burial of the 5 friends and all the women were in black mourning. Poppa said he wanted the older women to go-and dress for a party. The younger women and the kids had to stay home. At a given signal, the women were all to go to one room of the house and bar the door from the inside. He said they could mourn later. I wanted to go badly but John said, No. That was that.

The liquor was put in the front of the house and all the men were there, drinking, smoking and hanging around. When the music started they all went in and the women went to their room and the front door was barred on the outside-shutting in the outlaws. The Committee had quietly surrounded the house, guarding every window and door. However, one of the outlaws: Ab Kaneman, escaped through a window. Another man, Sol Wheat was not at the dance. These two high-tailed it out of the country and never returned. Four of the bad boy outlaws were caught: Young Floyd, Wade Alsup, BakeScott, and John Kirkendall.

(note: I don’t know if Wade Alsup was kin to the murdered man, Horace Alsup?)

Justice was swift. The Committee took the four bad boys and they were given a neck-tie-party and hung in the big oak tree that stands just outside our kitchen door. When, I went out the next morning to feed the calves, I was shocked to find the dead men hanging in our yard.

Looking in the Lee County Cemetery Book, Vol I. The Burns Cemetery at Blue Branch, Post Office, Texas shows that the son of John H. Burns is buried there along with three of the murders: John Kuyendall, Beck Scott, and Wade Alsup all hung on June 27, 1877. The same land holds their murdered neighbors. Young Floyd, is buried in Floyd Cemetery near the Bastrop-Lee County line.

After the killings,the Samuel Kite/ Sallie Burns family, Grandma Harriett, the widow and children of John H. Burns, Aunt Susan Mulligan and her kids and others of our Kite clan moved again, Lock, Stock and Barrel to Erath County to get out of the way of the bad element in Burleson Co. Texas. I went to Floyd County with my husband and became a planted Texican. 
Kite, Caswell (I202108334278)
 
38

John Ammon Powell, Sr.
27 November 1844 to 14 December 1928
Written about 1899 – In his 55th year


I, John Ammon Powell, was born in Pisgah, Iowa, November 27, 1844. The fourth child (John Ammon was the 5th child) in a large family of nine children.
My Father, James Powell, is from North Carolina – My Mother was Jemima Wimmer Powell – She was bon in the state of Indiana.
My Father was a partaker of the Missouri persecutions against the Latter Day Saints. At one time he refused to sign a petition against the Mormons – In consequence of his refusal the mob used violence against him – crushed one side of his skull with the barrel of a gun – After a long sick spell he recovered. There was damage to his brain and necessary surgical repair, causing him to be subject to an occasional “black out” (seizure) and the left side of his body to remain paralyzed.
My Parents arrived in Utah, October 13, 1852 – We came in the Company of Captain Robert Wimmer – Who was my Father’s Father-In-Law and my Grandfather. We went directly to Ogden, Utah. We lived there until 1854. My Father was drowned in the Weber River – West of Ogden – July 2, 1854. He was crossing the river on his horse – he fainted, fell off the horse and was drowned. I was in my 10th year.
After the death of my Father, My Mother was discontented with the location and moved south to Mill Creek, near Salt Lake City. From Mill Creek we moved to Springville, Utah. My Mother endured a lot of hardships.
From the time I was 13 years old, I managed an Ox-team. For years hauled timber and cordwood from Lambs Canyon to Salt Lake City.
I went into Kamas Valley in 1858 and took up a Homestead. There were only two houses in the Valley, at that time. I built the third house – It was for my Mother. I cut and hewed the logs and laid them into the wall with my own hands, with out any assistance.
It was a “Big” Comfortable one-room house. I was at that time fifteen years old. Mother lived in the house two years.
Later I built another log house near my Mothers. It was a great improvement over the first one.
I was married January 13, 1863 to Hannah Matilda Snyder. My first children were born in Kamas, Utah.
The third house I built in Kamas was better than the first two – But the 5th house I built in the Valley, was best of all.
The Black Hawk War – drove me out of Kamas – everybody had to move. So I moved to Lambs Canyon. Where I could work and not be troubled by the Indians. I never had any particular troubles with the Indians – Although I met them in dangerous moods.
In 1861, while I was in Kamas Valley, cutting hay with a scythe – a band of 50 Indians formed a circle and camped just above where I was working. They had the scalps of seven white men hoisted on poles – And were firing shots and yelling – I went into their cam – They didn’t pay any attention to me – The squaws were singing – while the men were circling around the camp with the seven scalps hoisted on seven poles. I recognized two of the scalps as belonging to two of my friends.
At another time while cutting wood in Lambs Canyon, I chanced to glance up just in time to see an Indian pointing a gun at me.
One day while hunting Elk and Deer near Woodland Lake, by Kamas, I was tracked by an Indian who was also hunting. I hurried to camp, dogging behind trees here and there – finally I spied the Indian in an open clearing – and beckoned for him to come to me in camp. When my partner arrived, in camp, the Indian went. There were about twelve other Indians going threw the Canyon that day- We felt more relieved when they had gone.
I stayed in Lambs Canyon, east of Salt Lake City, three years – after that I moved to Salem, Utah.
I married Sarah Jane Shields Plumb – January 6, 1870. My wife Matilda passed away in 1877, leaving six children – 3 girls and 3 boys. The oldest boy was 12 years and the youngest 6 months. My wife Sarah cared for the family most faithfully.
Regarding my experience as a huntsman – I will relate my first experience and encounter with a bear.
It was in Lambs Canyon one morning at daybreak – I saw a bear’s big track in my path. I looked around and saw him standing on a ridge. I at once climbed to the opposite ridge and shot – the first shot missed him. The second shot grazed and stunned him.
Then he went off into the timber. The next day I saw the bear in the same location and shot and killed him. This was my first bear. I was then 14 years old. In the course of my hunting I’ve killed eleven bear.
In December of 1878, my brother Abraham (Abe) Powell, Caleb Rhodes, Robbie Snyder and “Little” Johnnie Ammon Powell, Jr (about age 9) and I went on a deer hunt beyond Mt. Nebo – It proved to be hunt of fatal consequences.
Somewhat, south east of the head of Bennie Creek, here we camped for the night.
This location was achieved by going around by Thistle, Utah – down the Sanpete Road South to Birdseye, Utah – then West & South of Bennie Creek. This hunt was to serve two purposes – to obtain meat and wood for the winter.
Next morning at breakfast – Abe said, “I dreamed I was in a fight and had my stomach cut out, I don’t like my dream.” Said I, “I dreamed my wife Matilda came to me and beckoned me out of danger.”
After eating breakfast we hurried away from camp to hunt, as planned. The snow in the ravine, where we were hunting was deep and clean – not a track of any animal, what so ever.
Later in the day – I heard my Brother Abe calling – “Oh John” – “Oh John”. I was probably about 300 yard away from him – I knew something was wrong by the way he called. When I got to him – I found he had been skelped by a bear – both eyes had been clawed out and were hanging on his cheek. Sightless and in his agony, he had bumped into a dry pole – I found him sitting at the bottom of the pole, with his arms around it. I took off my shirt – bound up his head – put his eyes back in their sockets. He asked me for a drink of water. He asked me to make a fire and melt a hat full of snow over the warm coals – which I did.
I carried him about 75 yards away from the place of accident. Then he told me to go back and get his gun – when I found it and had returned – he asked me if he had cocked it. I told him he had not – He said, “You see the bear knocked me down before I had time to cock it.” (Unable to read the next line). Abe, and no doubt, waiting for him to come along. As Abe passed by, the bear attacked him so suddenly that it was impossible to protect himself. Abe said, “After the bear knocked him down – the bear went over and picked up the gun and tried to break it by biting and clawing at it. Then he would come rushing back and attack me again – tearing my eyes out.”
We arrived in camp about 3:00 o’clock A.M. in the morning. My brother asked what time it was – we did not have watches or a clock with us – but we looked up at the stars and approximated the time – then Abe said, “I’ll die at or by daylight.” At break of day, he fainted away.
When he revived he asked us to ordain him an Elder in the Church. Caleb Rhodes and I attended to this – Caleb pronouncing the Ordination. After a little while Abe, again sank into a swoon and died.
The next summer, while hunting in the same range area, on the Salem side of Mt. Gopher or Lopher (here the spelling is hard to read), I killed a bear and I am of the opinion it was the very one that had killed my Brother Abe. As to size – it was large for a Grizzly Bear. When loaded on a hayrack to display – with paw, arms and legs stretched out to each corner of the rack it covered most of the rack floor surface.
I had great adventures from time to time- with my friends, out deer hunting.
In April of 1879, we went out to Price and made a squatters claim on a homestead. About 1881, we moved to Price, Utah. Here I freighted while the Denver & Rio Grand Railway was being built.
We loaded at Tucker, Utah and unloaded at Green River, Utah. We freighted hay and grain and camp provisions for their work camps. I traveled about 15 miles a day.
On January 10, 1882, I married Rosaltha Allred in the Endowment House, at Salt Lake City, Utah.
During 55 years, my chief occupation has been farming and stock rising of horses and cattle – Mostly in the Price area. I built 5 different Ranch Houses – These were simple and plain log houses. Later I built three brick homes in Price, Utah. In my home building experience in Utah – I’ve erected 5 houses in Kamas, 2 houses in Lambs Canyon, 2 houses in Salem, 5 Ranch Houses in Carbon County. I also purchased 2 brick homes in Salt Lake City. It was well with me that I was a builder – for I had 3 Families. My first wife was the mother of 6 children. Second wife 11 children. Third wife 10 children. My wives were united by a bond of sisterly affection.
My message to my children and grandchildren and my posterity to follow is: “Be lifters and Builders, Not Leaners – And Let your Good Deeds speak for you.”


Abraham Powell – Was born – July 23, 1855 at Ogden, Utah.
Died December 6, 1878, on the slopes of Mt. Nebo – From mutilating wounds received from a Grizzly Bear, at the age of 23 years. (A tragic death)
From the time of his birth – his life consisted of constant trail blazing and adventures and having this life with a good family. Died in the faith a worthy man and a child of God and our brother. Written by John Ammon Powell about 1899. 
Powell, John Ammon (I200097543039)
 
39

KILGORE NEWS HERALD FRIDAY, JULY 1, 1966 (some areas too dark to read correctly)
Gwartney Family Rites Held Today
...Funeral services for Dr. Robert Gwartney, Kilgore dentist, his wife and their three children were held at ...p.m. today at the First Baptist Church.
...Edwin Mays, pastor, officiated. Burial was in Colonial Gardens cemetery at Marshall under direction of Sullivan Funeral Home of Marshall.
The services were for Dr. Gwartney, 43, his wife, Carolyn Sue, ..38?.., their daughters, Melanie Carol, 18, and Collene Kay, 10, and their son, Robert R. Gwartney, Jr. 12.
The Gwartneys were killed in a two-car collision Wednesday afternoon near Poteau, Okla., on the first leg of a three week vacation. There were enroute to Gravette, Ark. to visit relatives and had planned to continue their vacation in California.
The family had lived in Kilgore since 1955. Dr. Gwartney previously practiced denistry in Texarkana.
Dr. Gwartney was a native of Gravette, a veteran of World War II and a graduate of the University of Texas Dental School. He is survived by two brothers and two sisters.
Mrs. Gwartney was born in Timpson and previously lived at Marshall. She is survived by her mother, three brothers and two sisters.
Melanie was a native of Marshall and graduated this year from Kilgore High School. Robert was born in Texarkana, was a student at Kilgore Junior High School and was a member of the Pirates of the Kilgore Boys Baseball Assn. Colleen was a native of Kilgore and attended Chandler Elementary School.
Pallbearere were G.F. Ford, Roy Lawrence, James Harvey, Tommy Traylor, F.B. Cline, Dave Hall, C.L. Barbee, Alvin Wylie, Dayton Walkup, Deane Johnson, Charles F. Dickerson, and Mac Ashworth.
************************************************************KILGORE NEWS HERALD JULY 15, 1966
GWARTNEY WILL ACTION FILED IN GREGG COUNTY
LONGVIEW - An amended application to probate the joint Wills of Dr. and Mrs. Robert R. Gwartney of Kilgore and set out their known heirs was filed in Gregg County Court Tuesday.
The Gwartneys and their three children, all of Kilgore, were killed in a two-car collision on June 29, in East Oklahoma while on vacation trip.
It was the first time in the recollection of long-time employees of the County Clerk's offices, that a Will had been handled in which all the testators (or principals) died simutaneously.
The Gwartneys, Robert R. and Sue Kyle, had stipulated in their joint Will, dated July 8, 1965, that whoever survived the other would be independent executor or executrix, but in the event their deaths occurred simultaneously, their daughter, Melanie Carol, if she were 21 years old, would be appointed independent executrix.
If she had not reached that age, they stipulated that attorney John W. Ford execute the Will, and if not he, then attorney Robert G. Schleier.
Melanie Carol, 18, together with Robert R. Gwartney III, 12, and Colleen K., 10, died in the auto crash with their parents.
Ford filed application that the Will be admitted to probate and that Letters Testamentary be issued him, since the three children had been named heirs to the estate valued at more than $10,000.
The amended application set out the known heirs of Dr. Gwartney, a 43 year old dentist, as two brothers, Reginald Ray Gwartney, Route 3, Gravette, Ark. and Kenneth Lee Gwartney, Route 1, Biggs, Calif.; two sisters, Verla Ann Manx, Route 1, Diamond, MO, and Viola Lorens Finley, Wichita, Kans.
Mrs. Gwartney's known heirs listed in the amended application were her mother, Mrs. Icie Kate Kyle, Marshall; three brothers, J.P. Kyle, Port Arthur; Alfred A. Kyle, Delhi, La;, Mike Kyle, Elysian Fields, Texas; two sisters, Mozelle Chappell, Pasadena, Texas and Libby Elsbury, Mount Pleasant.
(Kilgore, Marshall, Texarkana, Pasadena, Elysian Fields, and Mount Pleasant are all cities in Texas) 
Kyle, Carolyn Sue (I200173304816)
 
40

Lavina E. Vaughn, a native of Orick, age 66 died after a lengthy illness in Orick. She had lived the past 15 years in Orick at the Hufford Ranch.

Step-mother of Gail Alcorn, sister of Mrs. Ida Francis, Walter Hufford, Leslie Hufford and Elmer Hufford, all of Orick. Half-sister of Josephine Gallion of Winston, Ore. Aunt of Joseph Hufford of Klamath Falls and Eric Hufford of Orick.

Services were held at Paul's Funeral Chapel in Arcata, Tuesday, January 14, 1970 at 1:30 PM. Services concluded at the Trinidad Cemetery. Pallbearers were: Henry Blankenship, Albert Zuber, Robert McNamara, Donald Kring, Lowell Hagood and Richard Davidson.

The fifth daughter of eight children born to Orick Pioneers, Frank Leslie Hufford and Myr L. Griffin, Lavina attended Orick Elementary school and then the Eureka Business College. In 1928 the Big Lagoon bridge was dedicated with Miss Lavina Hufford as Miss Orick and Miss Loretta Griffin as Miss Trinidad. 
Hufford, Lavina E (I200152971058)
 
41

May 1870 census of Sugar Loaf, Boone County, AR, found the Actkinson family living in dwelling #109:

J. D. Ackenson 34 TN - Farmer
Serina 21 TN
Sarah 7/12 TN - Born November 1869
Margaret 26 AR
Mary E. 3 TX
Sarah E. 1 TN
Henry E. 7 TX
Thomas 17 TN - Farmhand



4 June 1880 census of Harrison, Boone County, AR, found the Actkinson family living in dwelling #35:

John D. Actkinson 44 TN -- -- - Farmer
Sarena Actkinson 32 TN KY IL - Wife
Sarah E. Actkinson 10 AR TN TN - Daughter
James H. Actkinson 8 AR TN TN - Son
William C. Actkinson 4 AR TN TN - Son
Paralee Actkinson 7 AR TN TN - Daughter
Jessie Actkinson 2 AR TN TN - Son
Ruth Actkinson 1/12 AR TN TN - Daughter, Born May 1880
Margaret M. Actkinson 35 AR TN TN - Sister-in-law, Widow, Boarding
Mary E. Actkinson 13 TX TN TN - Daughter



5 June 1900 census of Keesee, Marion County, AR, found the Actkinson family living in dwelling #22. Jessy and Mandy said that they had been married less than a year and had no children:

John D. Actkinson 4/1836 64 TN TN TN - Widowed, Farmer
Jessy L. Actkinson 2/1878 22 AR TN TN - Son, Married, Farmer
Mandy E. Actkinson 1/1883 17 MO -- AR - Daughter-in-law
David E. Actkinson 5/1880 20 AR TN TN - Son, single, Farm laborer-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Notes for JOHN DAVID ACTKINSON:John David Actkinson was a Justice of the Peace in Marion County, Arkansas in the following years:
October 30, 1890 Crockett Township
October 31, 1892 Buffalo Township
October 31, 1894 Dodd City Township
Source: Justice of the Peace Roster, Marion County, Arkansas Courthouse Records.
John David Actkinson was buried in the Leadhill Cemetery with no marker. He was later moved when the Buffalo Shoals Reservoir was built in the early 1950's. (Info from Turnbow's Ozark Frontier Stories, Vol. 1, page 457.)The graves in the Leadhill Cemetery were relocated to the Milum Cemetery north of the town of Leadhill. Milum Cemetery was an existing cemetery a new addition was built north of the existing cemetery. This was the largest cemetery moved during the Buffalo Shoals Reservoir Project.Marion County, Arkansas Deed Book "A" , page 634 shows John D. Actkinson and wife granting property to S. B. Allen.Marion County, Arkansas List of Grand Jurors for August Term 1891, Page 234 shows on of the jurors to be J.D. Actkinson. 
Actkinson, John David (I34554108784)
 
42

MAYO, ROBERT B
SKG2 US NAVY
SKD3 US NAVY
DATE OF BIRTH: 02/02/1928
DATE OF DEATH: 07/05/2016
BURIED AT: SECTION 61A SITE 2385
RIVERSIDE NATIONAL CEMETERY
22495 VAN BUREN BOULEVARD RIVERSIDE, CA 92518 
Mayo, Robert Burl (I201002289472)
 
43

Miss Edith Lucas Bride of Peorian

The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois 7 Apr 1932, Thu Page 6

Miss Edith Lucas, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Lucas, 602 East Jackson street, became the bride of William Brannum of Peoria in a ceremony at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Calvary Presbyterian church of Peoria. The Rev. Eldon G. Lindberg officiated at the wedding.

Mr. and Mrs. Will Landis of Peoria were the attendants. The bride attended Bloomington schools and has been employed in a dress shop in Peoria. Mr. Brannum is engaged in the lumber business in Peoria, where the new home will be made. 
Brannum, William Samuel Jr (I200027053585)
 
44

Miss Edith Lucas Bride of Peorian

The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois 7 Apr 1932, Thu Page 6

Miss Edith Lucas, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Lucas, 602 East Jackson street, became the bride of William Brannum of Peoria in a ceremony at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Calvary Presbyterian church of Peoria. The Rev. Eldon G. Lindberg officiated at the wedding.

Mr. and Mrs. Will Landis of Peoria were the attendants. The bride attended Bloomington schools and has been employed in a dress shop in Peoria. Mr. Brannum is engaged in the lumber business in Peoria, where the new home will be made. 
Lucas, Edith A (I200027059053)
 
45

Obituaries from Benton County, Arkansas Vol 1 1884-1898 Pg 337 -
Markwell, J.W. - (from Seba) - J.W. Markwell departed this life Tues March 30th. His remains were interred in Center Point graveyard Wed morning. Rec McIntosh conducting the funeral services.

Benton Co Democrat - April 08 1897. 
Markwell, John William (I200118937953)
 
46

Obituary -


Arleigh Clark, Ex-Fire Dept. Lieutenant, Dies

Arleigh Bryon (sic) Clark, 56, retired Seattle Fire Department lieutenant died Sunday in a hospital after a brief illness.

Mr. Clark retired from the Fire Department in 1948 after 21 years service. His last position was at Engine Company No. 26, South Park.

Mr. Clark, born in Bridgewater, Va., lived for many years in Galesburg, Ill. before coming here 25 years ago. His residence was at 3308 35th Av. S.

Services will be held at 1 o'clock tomorrow at the Home Undertaking Co. Cremation will follow.

Surviving are his mother, Mrs. Florence W. Clark, Bellingham; a brother, C.B. Clark, Phoenix, Ariz., and a sister, Mrs. Hazel Johnson, Davenport, Iowa.

Seattle Daily Times, Tuesday, March 18, 1952, page 31 
Clark, Arleigh Byron (I202047483712)
 
47

Obituary -
A funeral for Merle Lee Brown of Mountain Home will be 11 a.m. Saturday at Kirby-Boaz Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Jimmie Snow officiating. Mr. Brown died Tuesday, July 26, 2005, at his residence. He was 80.Mr. Brown was born Sept. 16, 1924, at Birch Tree, Mo., to Elzy J. and Della Dean Brown. He married Gentry Floyd Aug. 19, 1946, at Reno, Nev. He was a retired, self-employed miner and lived in Burney, Calif., prior to moving to Mountain Home in 2003.
Mr. Brown is survived by his wife, Gentry Brown of Mountain Home; son, Ronald J. (Dian) Brown of Sonora, Calif.; one niece; and one nephew. He was preceded in death by his parents, an infant son and two brothers.
Memorials may be made to Hospice of the Ozarks or Fairview United Methodist Church.
Arrangements are by Kirby-Boaz Funeral Directors. Visit an online obituary and guestbook at www.kirbyboaz.com. 
Brown, Merle Lee (I200154193048)
 
48

Obituary -
Arthur Abraham Willis Jr., 86, of El Centro passed away on Sunday, September 18, 2016. Art was born on January 17, 1930 in Stinnett, TX.
Art was an Eagle Scout, a retired Navy CDR, P2V POC and an Instructor. He was the owner of San Diego Aviation and also an Aircraft Recovery Expert for Mexico. He was a Grandfather, Husband, Dad and a phenomenal raconteur.
He was preceded in death by his first wife, Margaret Willis. He is survived by his wife, Bertha Willis; his sons, Kip Willis, Mark Willis, Jerry Rubin and Carl Rubin; his daughters, Cathy Willis, Shirley Willis, Leslie Ortego and Elizabeth Lopez; 12 grandchildren and 9 great-grandchildren.
A celebration of life will be held in San Diego at a later date.
Published in Imperial Valley Press Online on Sept. 24, 2016 
Willis, Arthur Abraham Jr (I202063343042)
 
49

Obituary -
Catoosa- Loretta (Scott) Ramsey, 73, retired Ford Motor Co. manager, died Friday in Broken Arrow. Services pending. Kennedy-Kennard. (Tulsa World)
------------------------------
Loretta Scott Ramsey passed from this life on August 3, 2012 in Broken Arrow, OK at the age of 77 years, 9 months and 3 days. She was born on October 31, 1934 in Catoosa, OK to Claude and Hazel (Slater) Scott.

Loretta was the Valedictorian of the Catoosa High School class of 1951 and continued to keep in touch with her classmates all of her life.

She was a cheerleader, basketball player, softball player and Annual Homecoming Queen. On July 4, 1953, Loretta married Melton E. "Zeke" Ramsey in Catoosa, OK and they started their family. Despite being a successful career woman and manager at Ford Motor Company, Loretta was most proud of her kids and grandkids. Loretta's friends and sisters used to tease her about how "the longer she talked the more perfect her kids or grandkids became." She also enjoyed travelling and going to "therapy," which included playing the slots at the casino. Loretta will be missed dearly.

She was preceded in death by her parents, Claude and Hazel Scott; sisters, Ruby, Ruthie, Toots, Claudine, and Corrine; and brothers, Jackie, J.C., John and Cecil.

Loretta is survived by her husband of 59 years; three children and spouses; seven grandkids; six great-grandchildren; and numerous other nieces, nephews, family members and friends.

A Funeral Service will be held at 10:00 AM Tuesday, August 7, 2012 at the First Baptist Church in Catoosa, OK with Interment following at Wofford Cemetery in Catoosa, OK. Kennedy-Kennard, 
Scott, Martha Loretta (I200041232429)
 
50

Obituary -
DaVon Leaf "Bonnie" Byrd, 90, Augusta, retired Mobil Oil employee passed away, Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2010, at Lakepoint of Augusta.
Visitation will be held from 6-8 p.m. this evening, at Dunsford-Zeiner Funeral Home, Augusta. Graveside services will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 7, at Elmwood Cemetery, Augusta.
Bonnie was born May 8, 1920 to Harry and Jennie (Leaf) Byrd in Gordon, Kan. He graduated from Leon High School and served in the U.S. Army during WWII. He married Thelma Mauk in 1946. She passed away April 25, 1993 in Augusta. Bonnie loved to fish, collect arrowheads and was a wonderful stone carver. He married Margaret "Marge" Marie (Bruner) Behnke on June 17, 1994 in Augusta.
His survivors include: his wife, Marge of the home; step-son Mark Fitzgerald of Memphis, Tenn.; step-daughter, Sharon Blessing of Tulsa, Okla.; four step-grandchildren; one step-great-grandson and many nieces and nephews.
He was also preceded in death by his sister, Evelyn Carney and a niece, Caron Kofoid-Gant.
Memorials to Amedisys Hospice or the Church of Christ in Augusta in care of the funeral home. -
See more at: http://search.ancestry.com/search/obit/viewbody.aspx?db=web-obituary&pid=133464596&kw=&cpp=2012%5c06%5c19%5ccp_8710836.html&bhr=http%3a%2f%2fwww.augustagazette.com%2fobituaries%2fx742798192%2fDaVon-Bonnie-Byrd#sthash.3zzKP7UN.dpuf 
Byrd, DaVon Leaf "Bonnie" (I200142533746)
 

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