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1


11 Dec 1850 census of North Fork, Jasper County, IL, found the Ping family living in dwelling #463. Father Robert and brothers John, Anderson and their families were living next door:

Adison Ping 23 KY - Farmer
Rachel H. 19 OH


1860 Census of Willow Hill, Jasper County, IL found the Ping family living in dwelling #1293. Also in the household was Eliza Barron (18) from Kentucky who Anderson would marry in May, 1862. Neighbors included William Higgins (55), William H. Higgins (25) and their families as well as the Miller families:

Anderson S. Ping 32 KY - Farmer
Amanda Ping 27 KY
John Ping 10 IL
Rhoda J. Ping 7 IL
Jemima Ping 5 IL
Mary E. Ping 4 IL
Asa Ping 2 IL
William A. Ping 1 IL
Eliza Barron 18 KY



Anderson Ping died of Typhoid Fever on 3 March 1863 in Gallatin, Tennessee, while serving as private in Company D, 98th Illinois Infantry, Union Army. He had enlisted 3 Sept 1862.

Source: http://civilwar.ilgenweb.net/r100/098-d-in.html


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Regimental History ILLINOIS NINETY-EIGHTH INFANTRY (Three YEARS)

Ninety-eighth Infantry. - Col., John J. Funkhouser; Lieut.-Col. Edward Kitchell; Majs., William B. Cooper, David D. Marquis. This regiment was organized at Centralia and was mustered in Sept. 3, 1862. On Sept. 8 it was ordered to Louisville, Ky., and at Bridgeport, Ill., while en route, the train was thrown from the track by a misplaced switch, with the result that 8 men were killed and 75 wounded. On the 9th the regiment moved to Camp Jo Holt at Jeffersonville, Ind.

It was mounted in the spring of 1863 and assigned to duty in Tennessee, where on May 23 it made a reconnaissance to the front, driving in the enemy's pickets, killing 2 and wounding 4. On June 4 it moved out on the Liberty road and attacked the 1st Ky. and 11th Tex. Confederate cavalry, capturing 20 prisoners and 5 wagons. On the 10th it attacked the enemy at Liberty, driving his rear-guard of 150 men to Snow hill. In June it came upon the enemy at Hoover's gap, repulsing him, the regiment losing 1 man killed and 5 wounded. From June 24 to 28 it moved as the flank of the 4th division, cutting the railroad at Decherd and driving the enemy from the stockades. It did good service in the battle of Chickamauga and lost 5 killed and 36 wounded.

On Oct. 3 the 98th Ill. and 17th Ind. attacked a brigade of the enemy - his rear-guard - and defeated it, killing or wounding 15 or 20 of the enemy. On Dec. 1 the regiment, numbering 150 men, took the advance of Sherman's army, driving the enemy to Loudon, and the next day forded the Little Tennessee and moved to Knoxville. On Dec. 28 it had a skirmish with Wheeler's cavalry, driving them some distance and capturing the inspector-general of Kelly's Confederate division.

On May 23, 1864, the regiment crossed the Etowah river and moved towards Van Wert. Within 2 miles of Dallas it met the enemy and drove him to Dallas. It skirmished with the enemy on the 25th and moved toward Powder springs. On May 28 it took position on McPherson's right, dismounted and repulsed a charge of the enemy, and on the 29th moved to Burnt Hickory. At Noonday creek it skirmished with the enemy, then marched through Marietta and skirmished heavily, and on July 5 moved toward Roswell factory, drove the enemy's pickets from the Chattahoochee and took possession of the factory on the 9th. In April, 1865, the regiment participated in the capture of Selma, Ala., going into the action with 172 men and losing 9 killed and 2 mortally wounded 6 officers and 21 men wounded. It was mustered out on June 27, 1865.


Source: The Union Army, vol. 3

Battles Fought
Fought on 8 Sep 1862.
Fought on 24 Jun 1863 at Hoover's Gap, TN.
Fought on 25 Jun 1863 at Hoover's Gap, TN.
Fought on 19 Sep 1863 at Chickamauga, GA.
Fought on 20 Sep 1863 at Chickamauga, GA.
Fought on 24 Feb 1864.
Fought on 17 Apr 1864.
Fought on 20 Jun 1864.
Fought on 7 Jan 1865.
Fought on 2 Apr 1865 at Selma, AL.

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Estate settlement published 15 March 1866, Jasper County. 
Ping, Anderson Smith (I34554068277)
 
2


20 June 1900 census of Summit, Chautauqua County, KS, found William Sterling and family living in dwelling #123:

William Sterling 52 12-1847 OH farmer
Sarah E. 44 9-1855 IA
Rosa M. 23 11-1877 KS
Lotta J. 17 12-1882 KS
Hattie G. 14 9-1885 KS
Emma U. 12 8-1887 KS
Elmer L. 10 12-1889 KS
Jessa B. 8 2-1892 KS
Cora A. 5 11-1894 KS




22 April 1910 census of Summit, Chautauqua County, KS, found William and family living in dwelling #40. They indicated that they had been married 34 years and all 8 of their children were still living:

William C. Sterling 61 OH OH OH
Emma S. 54 IA ME OH
Jessa B. 18 KS OH IA
Cora A. 15 KS OH IA



6 January 1920 census of Chino, San Bernardino County, CA, found the Morgan family living in dwelling #44 on 5th Street:

John H. Morgan 29 OK OK KS - Farm laborer
Cora A. Morgan 25 KS IL IL - Wife
Leona P. Morgan 5/12 CA OK KS - Daughter



13 April 1930 census of Summit, Chautauqua County, KS, found the Morgan family living in dwelling #86. John and Cora said that they were first married at ages 21 and 17 respectively:

John H. Morgan 40 OK IN OH - Farmer
Cora A. Morgan 35 KS IL IL - Wife
Leona P. Morgan 10 CA OK KS - Daughter




1940 census of San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA, found the Morgan family living in dwelling #229 at 856 Fourth Street. They said that they lived at the same place on 1 April 1935:

John H. Morgan 50 OK - 8 years of education, Laborer - WPA Project
Cora Morgan 45 KS - Wife, 8 years of education, Housework - Private family
Leona Morgan 20 CA - Daughter, Single, Completed 1 year of college education


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1943 --- CALIFORNIA DEATH INDEX 1940-1997

Name: Cora A. Morgan - {Cora A, Sterling}

SSN: 554-24-8864

Gender: Female

Birth Date: November 11, 1894

Birth State: Kansas

Death Date: September 10, 1943

Death Place: San Bernardino

Mother's Maiden Name: Newton

Father's Surname: Sterling

Source: Ancestry.com

Researcher: Richard Parker 
Sterling, Cora Anna (I34554068945)
 
3


S1 US Navy Wold War II


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Obituary -
Simmie Oliver Hamilton
Graveside services for Simmie Oliver Hamilton were held on Friday, Dec. 7, at Lakeside Memorial Lawn Cemetery. The services were directed by the Miller Funeral Home. Mr. Hamilton died Dec. 3 at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center in Sacramento.
A native of Cash, Ark., he was 64 years of age. He was a Navy veteran of World War II. Mr. Hamilton was the brother of Ruth Harrel and Rubye Alexander of Arkansas, Aeiel B. Hamilton of Missouri. James 0. Hamilton of Florida, and Thelma Magie of Escondido, Calif.



Folsom Telegraph 12 Dec 1984




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27 Jan 1920 census of Little Texas (ED #46), Craighead County, AR, found the Hamilton family living in dwelling #134:

Andrew Hamilton 46 AR AR AR - Farmer
Minnie 41 AR AR AR
Ruth 18 AR AR AR
Rubbie 13 AR AR AR
Arale 11 AR AR AR
Charley 9 AR AR AR
Olin 6 AR AR AR
Thelma 4 AR AR AR
S.O. 1/12 AR AR AR


16 April 1930 census of Texas, Craighead County, AR, found the Hamilton family living in dwelling #60. Andrew and Minnie said that they were first married at ages 26 and 18 respectively:

A. J. Hamilton 63 AR AR AR - Farmer
Minnie 52 AR AR AR
Charley 16 AR AR AR
Odas 13 AR AR AR
S. O. 10 AR AR AR
Thelma 14 AR AR AR


16 April 1940 census of Jonesboro, Craighead County, AR, found the Hamilton family living in dwelling #147. They said that they lived in Craighead County, AR, on 15 April 1935:

A. J. Hamilton 66 AR - 3 years of education, Superintendent - County home, Earned $600 in past year
Minnie Hamilton 60 AR - 4 years of education
Thelma Hamilton 22 AR - Daughter, Single, 8 years of education, Asst. Superintendent - County home
S. O. Hamilton 20 AR - Son, Single, Completed 4 years of high school education, Taxicab driver, Earned $240 in past year 
Hamilton, Simmie Oliver (I34554071100)
 
4

Jacob was a soldier in Company "K", 1st regiment Illinois volunteers, US Army, in the Mexican War.



http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=seybold&GSiman=1&GScid=108206&GRid=133638849&



21 Nov 1850 census of Township 3 South 4 West, Pike County, IL, found the Seybold family living in dwelling #1553 and #1554:

#1553:
James Seybold 48 IL Farmer
Olive 39 NY
Joseph 20 IL
Jasper 17 IL
Doctor Gate 15 IL
Gilbert 13 IL
Hannah 12 IL
Mary 10 IL
Johana 9 IL
James 8 IL
Stephen 6 IL
Samuel 4 IL
George W. 2 IL

#1554:
Eli Seybold 23 IL
Elizabeth 20 TN
Jacob 24 IL



10 June 1880 census of Pleasant Vale, Pike County, IL, found the Seybold family living in dwelling #1:

Jacob Seybold 54 IL IL IL Farmer
Nancy J. 54 MO VA VA
Jasper N. 15 IL IL MO Farm laborer 
Seybold, Jacob (I34554071928)
 
5

14 Dec 1850 census of Saint Marie Precinct, Jasper County, IL, found the Miller family living in dwelling #272:

John Miller 50 OH
Mary 42 KY
William 21 IL
Thomas 16 IL
Jane 18 IL
John 13 IL
James 9 IL
Robert 1 IL


1860 Census of Willow Hill, Jasper County, IL, found the Neal family living in dwelling #1360. Next door in dwelling #1361 was Jane's father John Miller and family:

William Neal 28 KY - Farmer
Jane 28 IL
John T. 2 IL



21 July 1870 census of Willow Hill, Jasper County, Il found the Neal family living in dwelling #124. Next door was father John Miller (70) in dwelling #125:

Jane Neal 39 IL Widow, Keeping house
John 12 IL Works on farm
Martha 8 IL
Mary E. 7 IL


1880 census found Jane (48) living with son John T. Neal (22) and daughters Martha E. (18) and Mary E. (17) in dwelling #180 in Colville, Benton County, AR. This census shows that Martha is paralyzed. Neighbor in dwelling #178 was sister Belinda (Miller) Peck and family:

John T. Neal 22 IL KY IL
Jane 48 IL OH IL mother
Martha E. 18 IL KY IL sister
Mary E. 17 IL KY IL sister


9 Aug 1900 census of Webbers Falls, Cherokee Nation, OK, found Jane Neal and family living in dwelling #396:

Jane Neal 68 Jun 1831 IL OH IL widow
John T. 42 Mar 1858 IL KY IL single, Clerk - Dry Goods
Martha E. 39 Nov 1860 IL KY IL


28 April 1910 census of Webbers Falls, Muskogee County, OK, found Jane and son John living in dwelling #12 on Cotton Lane. Jane said that 2 of her 3 children were still living:

John T. Neal 52 Single IL KY IL Salesman - General store
Jane Neal 78 Widow IL OH IL 3 children, 2 living
Luticia Bias 52 Servant 
Miller, Jane (I34554068043)
 
6

2 April 1940 census of Ukiah, Mendocino County, CA, found the Allen family living at #6 Main Street in Potter Valley. Anthony said that he lived at the same address on 15 April 1935. Dovie said that she lived in San Jose, CA, on 14 April 1935:

Antony G. Allen 45 AR - 8 years of education, Farm laborer, Earned $60 in past year
Dovie G. Allen 22 OK - 7 years of education
Betty Jean Allen 4/12 CA


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Obituary -


Betty Jean Thomas
64 of West Plains

Betty Jean Thomas died peacefully at sunrise on Sunday April 25 (2004) at her home surrounded by family and friends.

She was born November 15, 1939 at Visalia, Calif. Mrs. Thomas devoted her life to others and enjoyed living on Dogwood Mountain in Douglas County, Mo.

She was the daughter of Anthony Graves Allen and Dovie Grace Lounsbury Allen. Mrs. Thomas was a Christian.

She was preceded in death by her parents, one sister, and one brother.
She was preceded in death by her parents, one sister, and one brother.

Survivers include six children; Kathryn Jean Andrews and Mary Elaine Thomas, both of Harrison, Leasa Thomas and Harold Allen Thomas, both of West Plains, Mo., William Anthony Thomas of Carney, Okla., and Norma "Nonie" Renee Merritt of Grover Beach, Calif.; the father of her children, Harold Nathan Thomas of Carney, Okla.; 13 grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; Uncle Emmitt, Aunt Norma Lounsbury, and cousin Pat Lounsbury, all of Pismo Beach Calif.; sister-in-law, Frances Richmond of Sapulpa, Okla.; many friends including Martha Faye Williams, friend of 55 years of Omaha, Veronica Patenode, friend of 37 years of Grants Pass, Ore., Lilly Welch, friend of 13 years of West Plains, Mo., and David and Kathy Findley, friends of 11 years of Seymoure, Mo.

Viewing was held Wednesday, April 28 at Robertson-Drago Funeral Home in West Plains, Mo. Graveside services were held Thursday, April 29 at the Old Methodist Cemetery in Omaha under the direction of Robertson-Drago Funeral Home. Reverend Bob Miller and wife, Susie, from Potters House Church in Omaha officiated the services.

Pallbearers were son, Harold Thomas; grandsons, Jacob Thomas, Zackary Thomas, Andrew Anderson, Aaron Merritt; and step-grandson, Joshua Gatlin.

John Gatlin of Harrison beautifully sang Amazing Grace. The 23 Psalm was recited by Rev. Miller and a poem written by Betty Thomas was read by Susie Miller.

Per her wishes, flowers were not purchased but 121 traditional Iris were cut from her garden and lovingly draped over her casket.

Contributions for funeral may be made to family members at P.O. Box 121, Harrison , Ark. 72602. Special thanks to all who joined us in celebrating our mothers life.


https://bolivarmonews.com/obituaries/betty-jean-thomas/article_1dbc4a30-f542-528a-a598-cddb43e596c2.html 
Allen, Betty Jean (I34554068013)
 
7

28 April 1910 census of Santa Ana, Orange County, CA, found Mack Miller and family living in dwelling #135 on 1st Street:

Mack A. Miller 37 IL IL TN Salesman - grocery store
Stella M. 37 IL IN IL
Charles F. 8 IL IL IL
Thomas D. 6 IL IL IL


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Charles was married 10 May 1922 in Richland Co, IL to Nellie Olivia Sappenfield. They had at least 2 children: Mack Irvin (1923-1980) and Lowell Marion (1924-1990).

Charles' Idaho death certificate states that his body was transferred to the Brown Colonial Mortuary in Santa Ana, California for final disposition. The death certificate also states that Charles was a Television Technician. 
Miller, Charles F. (I34554071178)
 
8

6 Jan 1920 census of San Rafael, Marin County, CA, found the Giari family living in dwelling #46:

Fulvio Giari 38 Italy Italy Italy - Janitor, Private
Dominica 34 Italy Italy Italy
Fred 7 CA Italy Italy - Son
Suzie 14 Italy Italy Italy - Daughter
Frank 5/12 CA Italy Italy - Son


5 April 1930 census of San Rafael, Marin County, CA, found the Giari family living in dwelling #137 on "A" Street. Fulvio and Domenca said that they were first married at ages 24 and 21 respectively. Fulvio said that he had immigrated to the United States in 1906, Domenca in 1912:

Fulvio Giari 49 Italy Italy Italy - Laborer, General
Domenca 44 Italy Italy Italy
Fred V. 17 CA Italy Italy
Frank 10 CA Italy Italy
Joseph 5 CA Italy Italy


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Obituary

FRED GIARI


GIARI, Fred

Died at his home in Pasadena April 29, 2012. He was 99.
Fred was born in the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco in an apartment, upstairs from Figoni's Hardware to Fulvio and Domenica Giari on February 5, 1913. A few years later his family moved to Fairfax, then to San Rafael. He met his wife of 55 years, Maygene, while attending Stanford University in 1939. Fred and Maygene made their home in Los Angeles, moving to Pasadena in 1957.

Fred had many interests and careers. He worked as a bicycle mechanic, grocery store clerk, draftsman, NBC page, and merchant seaman. After college, he worked as a salesman for Bohemian Distributing in Los Angeles and New York. In 1947, he changed careers again, working as a personnel manager at the Southern California Gas Company. In 1959 he moved on to Tidewater Oil company, and finished his professional working life as a manager of supervisory training and development at Phillips Petroleum in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, where he retired in 1978.

Upon retirement Fred and Maygene returned to their home in Pasadena. At age 74, Fred obtained his contractor's license, and spent his retirement fixing up his home, his children's homes, and various rental property. He did volunteer work at the Convalescent Aid Society in Pasadena, where he helped rebuild the office and warehouse. He enjoyed having "fix-it" projects, and maintained lasting friendships with hardware store owners and members of the building trades.

Fred leaves a large circle of friends, co-workers, and family. He will be remembered as a loyal friend, a mentor and confidant, and a cheerleader and supporter for his loved ones. His wife Maygene predeceased him in 2003. He is survived by his daughter Helen Campbell [husband John] of Oakland, his son Rick [wife Sue] of Alamo, his brothers John Giari and Joe Giari of Novato, 6 grandchildren, 5 great-grandchildren, his dear friend Katherine [Tash] Livingston, as well as many beloved nieces, nephews, and cousins. A memorial was held on May 12 in Pasadena, and a family celebration of life will be held in Novato on June 9 at his brother's home.

The family wishes to gratefully acknowledge the wonderful care and kindness of Yesika Benitez, Fred's caregiver. Her compassion and consideration enabled Fred to live at the home he loved with independence, safety, and dignity.
Memorial contributions can be made to the American Civil Liberties Union or to the Convalescent Aid Society in Pasadena.

Published in Pasadena Star-News on May 27, 2012


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I'm Really Rather Fond of You

by Fred Giari

I am 97 years old, waking up each day happy to be alive, looking around for teachable moments, and always remembering theres more to life than just brushing my teeth.

Born above Figonis hardware store in North Beach of San Francisco in 1913, I grew up playing at the corner of Columbus and Broadway, with all the older Italian women standing around criticizing me and all the children. Thats my boy. He is a cockroach was the kind of thing they would say.

My family immigrated from Italy. Years later, my wife Maygene and I made a pilgrimage back to my mothers home town high up in the hill country. Every bit of the town seemed to be made from concrete with no facing materials, a very hard and poor environment. It was on this trip that we learned of the tradition of children in rural Italy assigned the task of washing the bodies when friends and relatives died. It all seemed so natural in that environment. How different things are now.

Maygene and I had an extraordinary life together. I was always the talkative one, Maygene more reflective. One evening, 40 years into our marriage, while we were enjoying that special time in the evening when the sun sets, I got up and brought Maygene her favorite cocktail. She was busy grading English papers and barely looked up. Moments later, there was a small note dropped on my lap, with her perfect penmanship: You know I am really rather fond of you. M.

Maygene always had a plan and knew what she wanted. In life and in death. As we got older, and had a few health bumps along the way, she made her end-of-life wishes clear, and not only to me. She sent a copy of her advance directives with a cover letter to the president of the local hospital! She wanted no extreme measures. She was brave in life and brave in death.

One Sunday morning at home, Maygene was struck with pain and a jolt. Not missing a beat, not changing from her pink nightgown, she asked me to drive her to the hospital. On the way, we held hands. We shared the ride in silence and in acceptance.

As soon as we arrived at the hospital, it was a noisy jumble with medical professionals helping us into the emergency room. The doctors examined Maygene and offered treatment, which she refused. They then came to ask me what I wanted to do. I fought to be as brave as Maygene and responded that I respected her wishes. I sat next to Maygene, holding hands silently, and she died peacefully.

I miss Maygene every day. And she remains a role model for me to be brave in life. And brave in death.

https://www.deathwise.org/conversations/i%E2%80%99m-really-rather-fond-of-you/ 
Giari, Fred Augustus (I34554069553)
 
9

Rachel Miller (age 45+) appeared as the head of household in the 1820 census of Crawford County, IL, (page 44) with one male child under 10, one male child aged 10-15, two males aged 16-25 (probably John and James, both aged 20 and unmarried), three female children under 10 and one female child aged 10-15.


14 Dec 1850 census of St. Marie, Jasper County, IL, found Rachel living with her daughter Rachel Eaton and family in dwelling #277:

Absolom Eaton 45 IL
Rachel 38 IL
John 16 IL
William 5 IL
Mary 2 IL
Joshua Miller 45 IL
Rachel Miller 73 IN


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Newton Press -
Petition to Sell Lands of the June term of the Jasper County Court.

Samuel B. Todd, Administrator of the Estate of Samuel E. Miller, deceased, vs John Price and Jane Price his wife, Thomas Miller, Robert A. Miller, John Miller, Absalom Eaton and Rachel Eaton, his wife, Spear Allison and Belinda Allison his wife, Nancy Miller, Rachel Miller, Thomas K. Miller, William Miller, John Miller, Rachel Doty and John R. Eaton, Defendants...and all others interested...at the said June Term A.D. 1855...Jasper County...holden at Newton, on the Third Monday in June Next. Dated April 17, 1855 Samuel B. Todd, Administrator

[ http://genealogytrails.com/ill/cumberland/newtonpress.html ] 
Art, Rachael (I34554069297)
 
10

William & Nancy were living in Chickasaw County, Mississippi according to the 1850 Census. The date of the Census page is October 14, 1850. Living with William & Nancy was daughter Margaret age 24 yrs and William T. age 3 yrs.



31 Aug 1860 census of Division 1 (Dalton), Chickasaw County, MS, found the Ellis family living in dwelling #901:

Edman Ellis 52 NC Farmer
Marge 25 AL Wife
Jane 18 AL
James 13 AL
Jasper 8 MS
Thomas 5 MS
Wiley 4/12 MS


13 Aug 1870 census of Township 16 (Mount Pilia), Chickasaw County, MS, found the Ellis family living in dwelling #428:

Edwon Ellis 62 NC Farmer
Amanda 45 AL
Jasper N. 17 MS Attending school
Wiley 11 MS Attending school
Elizabeth Saleman 24 AL


11 June 1880 census of Precinct 4, Fannin County, TX, found the Ellis family living in dwelling #113:

M. M. Ellis 55 AL SC SC Widow, Housekeeper
W. R. Ellis 20 MS NC AL Works on farm 
Archibald, Margaret Means (I34554071603)
 
11
12 April 1930 census of Okmulgee, Okmulgee County, OK, found the Lyon family living in dwelling #364 on West 8th Street. William and Elda said that they were first married at ages 19 and 15 respectively:

William "H" Lyon 31 KS IA MO Machinist - Pipe Supply
Elda 28 KS MO IL
Rosabele 11 KS MO IL
Wilmar J. 10 KS MO IL
Billie H. 8 KS MO IL
Norasona 6 KS MO IL
Robert L. 4 KS MO IL


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Obituary -
Wilema Jean Garlow, 92, was born on Valentine's Day, February 14. 1920 and went to be with the Lord on Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, November 22, 2012.
Wilema "Jean" has been a resident of Manor Park Nursing Home for the last 15 years. She was a hairdresser in Midland for 30 years. Jean was a vivacious and vibrant woman who loved painting and playing symphonic cello in her youth. Jean was known for her beautiful smile, style and creative phrases.
She is survived by her sister Narsona Stephens of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, her son Glenn Dale Garlow & wife Kathy of Mission Viejo, California, daughter Ellen White & husband Clay of McKinney Texas, grandsons Lance Garlow of Ostego, Michigan, Brent Garlow of Schoolcraft, Michigan, Ronald Dickman of Eldorado, Oklahoma, granddaughters Kim Hewett of McKinney Texas, Tammra Bergman of Hobbs, New Mexico, Jami Bassett of Long Beach, California, Joelle Schope, of Dana Point, California, 13 great grandchildren and 3 great, great grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by her mother and father, William & Elda Faith Lyon, brothers Bob, Jim, and Bill Lyon, sister Rosa Belle White and daughter Patsy Jean Watlington.
There will be a private memorial service for her family. Remembrances may be given to Home Hospice of Midland.
Arrangements are under the direction of Nalley-Pickle & Welch Funeral Home & Crematory of Midland. -
See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/mrt/obituary.aspx?n=wilema-jean-garlow&pid=161309557#sthash.LI7nJbYp.dpuf


Published in Midland Reporter-Telegram on Nov. 29, 2012 
Lyon, Wilema Jean (I34554071544)
 
12
14 Dec 1850 census of St. Marie, Jasper County, Illinois, found the Eaton family living in dwelling #277. Rachel Eaton was living with her mother Rachel Miller, age 73.

Absolom Eaton 45 IL
Rachel 38 IL
John 16 IL
William 5 IL
Mary 2 IL
Joshua Miller 45 IL
Rachel Miller 73 IN


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Newton Press -

Petition to Sell Lands of the June term of the Jasper County Court.

Samuel B. Todd, Administrator of the Estate of Samuel E. Miller, deceased, vs John Price and Jane Price his wife, Thomas Miller, Robert A. Miller, John Miller, Absalom Eaton and Rachel Eaton, his wife, Spear Allison and Belinda Allison his wife, Nancy Miller, Rachel Miller, Thomas K. Miller, William Miller, John Miller, Rachel Doty and John R. Eaton, Defendants...and all others interested...at the said June Term A.D. 1855...Jasper County...holden at Newton, on the Third Monday in June Next. Dated April 17, 1855 Samuel B. Todd, Administrator

[ http://genealogytrails.com/ill/cumberland/newtonpress.html ] 
Miller, Rachel (I34554070872)
 
13
7 Aug 1850 census of Boothbay, Lincoln County, ME, found the Mathews family living in dwelling #178:

Arthur Mathews 33 ME - Mariner
Rindy 28 ME
Theodore 5 ME
Elonzo F. 2 ME
Charles G. 4/12 ME


18 June 1860 census of Boothbay, Lincoln County, ME, found the Mathews family living in dwelling #220:

Arthur Mathews 41 ME - Carpenter
Arinda 37 ME
Theodore 15 ME - Fisherman
Alonzo 13 ME
Charles G. 10 ME
George M. 8 ME


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Military Service:

On 21 February 1865 Charles enlisted as a Drummer in Company "F", 12th Maine Infantry Volunteers and was discharged 3 March 1866 at the close of the Civil War. On 17 October 1868, Charles enlisted for 5 years in Company "L", 5th Cavalry, U.S. Army, at Boston, MA, and served in Battery G, 4th U.S. Artillery until he was discharged 24 October 1873. At his October 1868 enlistment, Charles said that he was 21 years old, born in Boothbay, Maine, and was employed as a seaman. He was described as being 5' 7" tall with blue eyes with light hair and complexion (refer to 1868 US Army Register of Enlistments). On 7 July 1873, while still serving in Company "L", Fifth Cavalry Regiment, Charles was promoted to Sergeant. On 15 January 1881, Charles was promoted to First Sergeant in Company "C" of Instruction Regiment of General Mounted Service, 8th Cavalry, at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. He served at Jefferson Barracks for 10 years 8 months and 16 days, re-enlisting on 13 February 1884 and 13 February 1889, until he was discharged 28 October 1889 for disability.

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9 June 1880 census of Jefferson Barracks, Carondelet, Saint Louis County, MO, found Charles serving as a soldier:

Charles G. Matthews 31 ME ME ME - Soldier, Single


15 June 1900 census of Nashville, Davidson County, TN found Charles and family living at 1009 Jefferson St. They said that they had been married 20 years and 5 of their 7 children were still living:

Charles G. Matthews Feb 1846 54 ME ME NY Railway motorman
Mary A. Sep 1860 39 MO Ire Ire
Henry A. Mar 1882 18 MO ME MO Wool weaver
Maggie A. Dec 1885 14 MO ME MO Wool weaver
Mable F. May 1889 11 MO ME MO
Charles G. Jan 1892 8 TN ME MO


27 April 1910 census of Nashville Ward 3, Davidson County, TN, found the Matthews family living in dwelling #328. Charles and Mary said that they had been married 29 years:

Charles G. Matthews 62 ME ME ME - Night Watchman
Mary A. 50 MO Ireland Ireland


2 Jan 1920 census of Keokuk Ward 7, Lee County, IA, found the Matthews family living in dwelling #13 in the National Cemetery:

Charles G. Mathews 73 ME ME ME - Superintendent, National Cemetery
Mary 60 MO Ireland Ireland


7 April 1930 census of Nashville, Davidson County, TN found the Belk family living at 1007 Acklen Ave. They had adopted a son and daughter. They indicated that they had been married 24 years. Also in the household was Maggie's widowed father, Charles Matthews:

Joseph A. Belk 56 TN TN TN Pilot - Steamboat
Maggie A. 44 MO ME MO
Gloria A. 6 TN TN US adopted daughter
Ernest E. 5 TN US US adopted son
Charles G. Matthews 83 ME ME ME father-in-law



9 April 1940 census of Nashville, Davidson County, TN found Charles living with the Belk family at 1007 Acklen Ave. They said that they had lived at this same address on 1 April 1935:

Mrs. J. A. Belk 54 MO - Widow, 6 years of education
Gloria A. Belk 16 TN - Daughter, Completed 3 years of high school
Charles G. Matthews 93 ME - Father, Widowed, 8 years of education



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Biography - Charles Gilman Mathews

Charles Gilman Mathews was born 2 February 1849 in Boothbay, Lincoln County, Maine, the descendant of a long line of Boothbay fishermen. The family name was usually spelled "Matthews" but Charles apparently preferred to use the spelling "Mathews".

On 21 February 1865, during the Civil War, at age 16, Charles enlisted as a Drummer in Company "F", 12th Maine Infantry Volunteers and was discharged 3 March 1866 at the close of the war. He returned to Boothbay as resumed his life as a seaman.

Two years later, on 17 October 1868, Charles enlisted for five years in Company "L", 5th Cavalry, U.S. Army, at Boston, Massachusetts, and served in Battery "G", 4th U.S. Artillery until he was discharged 24 October 1873. At his October 1868 enlistment, Charles was described as being 21 years old, born in Boothbay, Maine, and employed as a seaman. He was also described as being 5' 7" tall with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion.

On 7 July 1873, while still serving in Company "L", Fifth Cavalry Regiment, Charles was promoted to Sergeant. On 15 January 1881, Charles was promoted to First Sergeant in Company "C" of the Instruction Regiment of the General Mounted Service, 8th Cavalry, at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. He served at Jefferson Barracks for 10 years 8 months and 16 days, re-enlisting on 13 February 1884 and 13 February 1889, until he was finally discharged 28 October 1889 for disability.

On 28 September 1880, while serving at Jefferson Barracks, at age 31, Charles married 20 year old Mary Delaney of Saint Louis, Missouri. Around 1892, after his retirement from military service, Charles and Mary moved to Nashville, Tennessee, where there youngest son, George, was born. Their three older children, Margaret (Maggie), Harry and Mabel, were all born in Saint Louis.

In the 1900 census Charles was listed as being employed as a railway motorman in Nashville, Tennessee. According to the 1910 census, the family was still living in Nashville and Charles was employed as a night watchman. Their two daughters had married local boys from Nashville. Oldest son Harry had apparently moved to New York where he was employed in the bakery business.

September 1917 Charles was appointed Superintendent of the National Cemetery at Nashville, Tennessee. On 17 January 1918, he was transferred to the Keokuk National Cemetery in Keokuk, Iowa, where he served as Supervisor until his retirement on 31 May 1921. The 1930 census showed Charles as a widower living with his oldest daughter, Maggie Belk, and her family in Nashville. Maggie's husband, Joseph Belk, was the captain of a river barge tow boat.

During his retirement, Charles took up the hobby of wood carving and produced many ship models and other finely carved items. Photos exist of Charles with some of his ship models. Charles also carved a fancy letter opener for his daughter Maggie and an exact replica of a straight razor for son-in-law Joe Belk.

Charles died 2 September 1940 at the home of his daughter Margaret in Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee, and was buried in Spring Hill Cemetery in Nashville.

Charles' possessions included several military documents as well as a beaded Indian pouch and two pairs of beaded Indian moccasins that were made for him and his son Harry in 1892 by an Indian Scout at Jefferson Barracks (these details are inscribed on the sole of one of Harry's small moccasins). These items, along with the carved letter opener and razor mentioned above, were passed along to Joe and Maggie Belk's adopted son, Ernest Everett Belk. These items are destined to be displayed in the Missouri Civil War Museum at Jackson Barracks.

Charles' grandson, Ernest Belk, also had an exciting military career. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy on 24 November 1941, shortly before the attack at Pearl Harbor, and fought in both the European and Pacific campaigns, including the Invasion of Sicily, the Normandy Invasion and the Invasion of Okinawa. He also saw action in the Korean War and the Vietnam War. He retired in 1975 as a highly decorated Master Chief (HTCM).

In June 2010, military documents and personal items related to Charles Mathews, which were passed down to his grandson Ernest Belk, were all donated to the Missouri Civil War Museum in St. Louis, Missouri, to be included in their exhibit on the Jefferson Barracks Historic Site. Refer to www.mcwm.org 
Mathews, Charles Gillman (I34554071421)
 
14
7 Feb 1920 census of Mayer, Yavapai County, AZ, found the Ferguson family living in dwelling #682:

Claude Ferguson 39 CA US TN - Mining engineer, Metal mine
Jennie C. 35 WI England WI
Evan T. 9 CA CA WI
Claude H. 7 CA CA WI
Tevis C. 2 5/12 AZ CA WI



9 April 1930 census of Grass Valley, Nevada County, CA, found the Ferguson family living in dwelliong #157 on Star Empire (Mine) Property. Claude and Jean said that they were first married at ages 30 and 27 respectively:

Claude Ferguson 50 CA AR US - Engineer, Mine
Jennie E. 47 WI England WI
Evan E. 20 CA CA WI
Claude H. 19 CA CA WI
Tevis C. 12 CA CA WI


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Obituary -

Captain Claude Harding Ferguson, also known as "Stub," "Fergie," and "2640," has Gone West. He "slipped the surly bonds of earth" and headed for his final resting place on July 24, 2004, dying peacefully at the age of 92 in Prescott, Ariz.


Born in Nevada City, Nev. on Feb. 29, 1912, he dreamed of being a pilot and worked in mines as a young man to finance that dream. After receiving his early training flying biplanes in Canada in the 1930s, he became an instructor and went on to a 30-year career in aviation that included stints with Mid-Continent, Pacific Northern Airlines, Southwest Airlines, Bonanza Airlines and Hughes Air West, from which he retired in 1972 with a reputation as the consummate pilot.

Highlights included serving as a test pilot at the Douglas Aircraft plant in Santa Monica, Calif. during World War II, and serving as the inaugural Chief Divisional Pilot for Bonanza Airlines in Phoenix. While there he was involved in transitioning the airline to F-27 turbo props, which brought a new era of commercial aviation to Ariz. He also was a member of Bonanza's first class to complete training on the DC-9, his favorite, and a longtime member of Quiet Birdman (QB) and the North East Phoenix Varmint & Big Game Hunter & Fisherman's Association.

His children will remember him as an avid outdoorsman and fine role model who played the harmonica, wrote endearing poems, took them on countless family outings, and loved cocker spaniels and exploring the Pacific Northwest. He was preceded in death by two brothers, his parents, and last year by his devoted wife of 59 years, Loretta C. Ferguson.

Survivors include children Michael Evan Ferguson and wife Ellen of Pelican, Alaska, Linda J. Barkman and husband John of Phoenix, Randy Lee Ferguson of Las Vegas, Nev., and Kelly Claude Ferguson and wife Camille of Sitka, Alaska. He also leaves 8 grandchildren and 4 great-grandchildren.

Services will be private. Over and out.

Published in the Arizona Republic on 7/27/2004. 
Ferguson, Claude Harding (I34554071353)
 
15
8 April 1940 census of White River, Mellette County, SD, found the Chapman family living in dwelling #101 on Investment Avenue. They said that they had lived in the same location on 1 April 1935:

John Chapman 48 IA - Laborer - WPA, 8 years of education, $484 in annual wages
Flora 47 WI - 4 years of high school education
Doris 17 SD - 3 years of high school education
Ward 16 SD - 8 years of education
Frederick 15 SD - 8 years of education
Betta J. 12 SD - 6 years of education
Esther 11 SD - 5 years of education
Olive 9 SD - 2 years of education
Blanche 7 SD - 1 year of education
Carol 6 SD
Darrel 5 SD
Vonetta 2 SD

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Obituary -
Vonnetta McCormack·
·
·
Vonnetta Renee McCormack, “Vonnie”, passed away on April 6, 2013. She was 75.
Vonnie was born on Oct. 5, 1937, to John and Flora Chapman of White River, S.D. She was the youngest of 14 children. She loved to do crafts, and write poems and stories.
She is survived by her husband of 57 years, Edward L. McCormack; sons, Timothy, Patrick, Michael (Inger) and Joseph (Amy); daughter, Linda (Patrick Cranor); sisters, Ollie and Jackie; and her nie grandchildren, Patrick, Kenny, Erik, Chris, Sara, Thomas, Simon, Eddie and Joey.
The family would like to thank Golden Empire and its staff for the quality of service and care provided to our loved one.
Arrangements are under the care of Chapel of the Angels Mortuary, Grass Valley.
http://www.theunion.com/news/obituaries/vonnetta-mccormack/ 
Chapman, Vonnetta Renee (I34554072243)
 
16
BRETT PATRICK DAWSON
Address: 13606 PRIMWOOD ST, San Antonio city, TX 78233.
Licenses:
Mechanic - Airframe;
Mechanic - Powerplant

www.city-data.com › Texas › Airman in Texas › San Antonio, Texas 
Dawson, Brett Patrick (I34554071796)
 
17
BRIG GENERAL US AIR FORCE WORLD WAR II, KOREA



3 Jan 1920 census of Butler, Vermilion County, IL, found the Neal family living in dwelling #8 on Main Street:

William Neal 38 IL IL IL Barber
Daisy 36 IL IL IL
Erman 13 IL IL IL
Haskel 10 IL IL IL
Omeada 8 IL IL IL
Justa 6 IL IL IL
Madeline 5 IL IL IL
John 3/12 IL IL IL
Raymond 2/12 IL IL IL


-----------------------------------------------------------------------


BRIGADIER GENERAL HASKELL E. NEAL
Retired June 01,1964 Died July 15,1981

Haskell E. Neal was born in Louisville, Ill., in 1904,and moved to Hoopeston, Ill., in 1921. He displayed an early interest in radio communications, completing his first homemade receiver when he was only 12 years old. His inclinations led him to enlist in the Army Air Corps at Scott Field, Ill., March 13, 1928. Almost from the moment of his enlistment he became involved in the development of military communications.

As an enlisted man, he attended service schools in both the Air Corps and the Signal Corps, and also the RCA Resident School in New York in 1932.

His extensive 14 year background of military experience, specializing in the growing field of communications, qualified the then Master Sergeant Neal for elevation to second lieutenant May 5, 1942. As a commissioned officer he was first assigned to the 13th Communications Squadron, a task organization formed at Morrison Field, Fla., to provide communications support for planned invasion and military operations in North Africa.

He served as commanding officer of the 13th Communications Squadron, Africa, and as regional control officer of the 13th Airways Communications Region from May 4, 1942 until Aug. 31, 1943. Accepting new communications responsibilities at a pace commensurate with the speed of the whirlwind African campaign, he was named area control officer for all of Africa and the Middle East Sept. 1, 1943. He held this position until Dec. 13, 1944.

His promotions during wartime paralleled the growth of his responsibilities. He was promoted to first lieutenant May 11, 1942, six days after he was commissioned. He skipped the grade of captain completely, was promoted to major June 6, 1942, to lieutenant colonel Feb. 25, 1943, and to colonel Aug. 28, 1944.

After the communications build-up necessary to the North African campaign was completed, Colonel Neal became commander of the 3rd AACS Wing at Elmendorf Field, Alaska, Dec. 14, 1944. He received the additional duty of air communications officer for Alaska Feb. 4, 1945. In this capacity, he reported directly to the chief of staff, U.S. Air Force, who was, at that time, General H.H. ("Hap") Arnold.

After serving in Headquarters AACS as assistant chief of staff; operations, training and requirements from May 1945 until August 1947, Colonel Neal was selected to attend the Air Command and Staff School at Maxwell Field, Ala. Upon graduation from the Air Command and Staff School, he was assigned as director of communications and electronics for the Caribbean Air Command.

Returning to the United States in January 1950, Colonel Neal entered the Armed Forces Staff College at Norfolk, Va., from which he graduated in July 1950.

He was named assistant director of communications and electronics, Continental Air Command in August 1950; and, when Air Defense Command and Tactical Air Command were reborn out of the reorganization of CONAC, he was named director of communications and electronics for the Air Defense Command.

In this capacity, he was associated with the build-up of Air Defense Command from an organization embracing only two fighter wings and less than a score of active AC&W sites to the modern fighting force charged with responsibility for the air defense of the North American Continent. As director of communications and electronics, he was the whip behind the development of a modern surveillance and detection system that grew from a jury rigged "lash-up" expedient to an integrated AC&W system composed of hundreds of permanent radar stations, including the Pine Tree Line, the seaward extension of radar by picket ships, Texas Towers, airborne "early warning" aircraft, and the Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line.

On July 11, 1955, Colonel Neal was promoted to brigadier general. Later, in recognition of his outstanding service to the nation through his assignment with Air Defense Command, General Neal was awarded the oak leaf cluster to the Legion of Merit for duty performed between 1951 and 1957. In addition to his two Legions of Merit, General Neal has also been awarded the Commendation Ribbon.

From July 8, 1957 to March 9, 1959 General Neal was assigned as commander, 1807th AACS Wing, Bitburg, Germany. Soon after his arrival, the 1807th was redesignated as the European-African Middle Eastern AACS area with its headquarters transferred to Weisbaden, Germany.

On March 10,1959 General Neal was designated commander of the newly formed Ground Electronics Engineering-Installation Agency with Headquarters at Griffiss Air Force Base, N.Y. Under his direction, GEEIA has grown from a widely separated heterogeneous group of individuals to a modern, unified agency charged with the engineering and installation of the Air Forces entire ground communication systems and facilities. Under his leadership GEEIA achieved the maturity of a "can do" organization. This includes an active role in all phases of ground electronics from the massive, integrated installation of communications at each Atlas, Titan and Minuteman missile site, to the down range tracking facilities of the Atlantic Missile Test Range, the base wire and telephone development schedules at each Air Force installation and integral participation on each of the "L" systems such as Sage and Aircom.

(Current as of July 1962) 
Neal, Brigadier General Haskell E (I34554077698)
 
18
Deeds & Wills Bk. Vol. 11 p.136
Dated Jan 22, 1784 probated March 15, 1784
In the name of God amen this twenty second day of January in the year of our Lord Christ one thousand seven hundred and eighty four
I ----William Atkins of the County of Pittsylvania being week of body but of sound mind and memory, thanks be to God my maker for it do constitute and ordain this to be my last will and testament disannulling all other will or wills doconstitute and commit my body to the Earth from whence it was taken and my soul to God who gave it in sure and certain hopes of the resurrection.
Item I give and bequeth unto my daughter Elisabeth Shockley one shilling Sterling which I give to her and her heirs forever.
Item I give and bequeth unto my daughter Bidey Witcher one shilling Sterling, which I give to her and her heirs forever.
Item I give and bequeth unto my daughter Agness Polley one Shilling Sterling which I give to her and her heirs forever.
Item I give and bequeth unto my daughter Nancy Witcher one Shilling Sterling which I give to her and her heirs forever.
Item I give and bequeth unto my daughter Sarah Parsons one Shilling Sterling which I give to her and her heirs forever.
Item I give and bequeth unto my Son Owen Atkins one Negro Girl called Milley which I give unto him and his heirs forever.
Item I give and bequeath unto my Son Jesse Atkins one Negroe Wench called Hannah which I give unto him and his heirs forever with the increas of her body from this date. Also one Negro boy called James which I give unto him and his heirs forever. Also one Negro Wench called Eady whichI give unto him my said Son Jesse to him and his heirs forever. I give and bequeath unto him and his heirs forever, one grey Horse also all the household furniture and Beds and furniture and all movable utensils to him and his Heirs forever with half of my Stock of Cattle, Hogs, and Sheep. I also give unto my said son Jesse all the land on the Northside of the Water or Creek that my Mill's on with the Plantation and buildings Excep about ten yards above where the dirt is dug from the pond and then cestraight with hoppers path leaving the hog pen forty yards to the left-hand straight to the firsline that was made between Owen Atkins and myself thence with the said line to fork of the Creek which I give to him and his heirs forever
Item I give and bequeath unto my Son William Atkins all the Land on the South side of the Creek that the Mill is on which I possess with my mill and with the balance that is not willed to my son Jesse on the Northside of said Creek which I give to him and his heirs forever also one Negro girl called Ginny which I give to him and his heirs forever with the increase of her body Also the half of my Stock of Cattle & hogs & Sheep which I give to him and his heirs forever Also one Steel plate whip saw to him and his heirs forever as Witness my hand and Sealed with my seal the day and year first above written.
Signed, Sealed and delivered his
In presents of William X Atkins, SS.
Noton Dickinson, Isaac Martin mark
Joseph Standbye
At a Court held for Pittsylvania County the 15th day of March 1784 the within last Will and Testament of William Atkins deceased was proved by the Oaths of two of the witnesses thereto and Ordered to be recorded. a Certificate for obtaining Letters of Administration of the Estate of the said William Atkins decd with the Will annexed is granted to Jesse Atkins who made oath according to Law and with Thomas Hodges and Noton Dickinson his securities entered into Bond as the Law directs and acknowledged the same.
Teste Will Tunstall CS. 
Adkins, William Vortimer Jr. (I34554071008)
 
19 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554072339)
 
20
Married to Minerva Johnson on October 24, 1876 in Crawford Co, Illinois. She was born 1857 in Illinois.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=91988099




30 June 1860 census of Township 6 Range 14 (Oblong), Crawford County, IL, found Horatio and family living in dwelling #1153. Nearby in dwelling #1150 was Richard and Achsah (Miller) James.

Horatio James 44 OH farmer
Elizabeth 33 IL
Eliza 18 OH
Henry 16 IL
Absolom 14 IL
Mary 10 IL
Margaret 8 IL
Thomas 4 IL
Harriet 1 IL


18 July 1870 census of Oblong, Crawford County, IL, found the James family living in dwelling #158:

Richard James 41 IN - Farmer
Achsah 32 IL
Philoma 19 IL
Deborah 16 IL
Margaret 8 IL
Harriett 6 IL
Thomas M. 14 IL - Works on farm
Margaret F. 18 IL - House help (Margaret is the daughter of Horatio and Elizabeth James)
Charles B. Douglas 1 IL
Daniel Mock 28 OH - John D. Mock
Harriet J. Mock 20 IL - Mary Jane James 
James, Thomas M. (I34554070843)
 
21
Obituary -
On October 11, 2017 at 7:13 pm, Jo Anna Miller went to be with her Lord. She was preceded in death by her parents, Ernest Joseph Hamblin (Papa Joe) and Betty Lou Fugitt. She is survived by her husband, Tim Miller; her sister, Jeannie Schenk; her two daughters and their spouses, Wendy and Matt Eytchison, and Hattie Miller and Steve Ward; and her four grandchildren, Joey and Grayson Eytchison, and Molly and Sadie Christensen.
Jo was a woman that understood love on a level much deeper than simply kindness and affection. Not to say that there wasn't an abundance of both of those things. But for those that she loved, which appears to have been in the thousands, her love was brave enough to call out and provide what was needed, not just what was wanted. But to be clear, this woman was more than just loving and nurturing, she was extraordinarily intelligent. Her mind was constantly gathering and processing information from all kinds of sources. I remember when I was little we would go to the library and she would bring home 7 - 10 books. The topics ranged from psychology, fictional entertainment, politics, and medicine and so on. And seven days later she was done and ready to check out more books. Sometimes I wondered if her mind should have been put to bigger use, to serve this world in a bigger capacity. Her father, affectionately called Papa Joe, always thought that she should have been president. As much as I would have loved to see how she would lead a country and how good it would be for everyone, in the last few days it has become clear to me that her mind and her love served this world more than a president could.
Matthew, a disciple of Jesus, quotes Him saying to do merciful deeds without anyone knowing. It is clear that my mom served and loved people from her heart and not for any reward of praise. I believe she did this because she understood loss. I hope that all of us who have been touched by her and feel the great loss of losing her will honor her by loving each other and meeting each other's needs.
Please join us to celebrate her life on Sunday, October 22nd at 1pm at The Views RV Park, located at 24990 Hwy 184. We will be serving spaghetti lunch in honor of the countless spaghetti lunches she fed her family and friends every Sunday after church. 
Hamblin, Jo Anna (I34554068834)
 
22
Story copied from the following website:
http://www.dyefamily.us/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I00409&tree=DyeFamily

· 1779: "Fauntleroy Dye, an ex-tobacco inspector of Richmond County, had fallen into the hands of the enemy in 1779 and returned home somewhat later with a considerable sum of money, which naturally excited suspicion in the community. Dye, who had become thoroughly tainted during hsi captivity, began to use his influence to persuade his neighbors to resist militia call-ups and to hold private meetings of a doubtful character at his house. Learning this, major Joel, with a party of mounted volunteers, went to Richmond, arrested one Tiffie, "a most notorious promoter of sedition" and surrounded Dye's House, where he took a few armed Tories, who had "in open contempt of the laws of their country, bid defiance to the county lieutenant, and held constant meetings of the disaffected". A court-martial at Leedstown found Dye guilty of giving intelligence to the enemy and encouraging desertion, and sentenced him to prison for the period of the war.
·

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From Ancestry.com Message Boards: http://boards.ancestry.com/surnames.dye/1133.1.1.1/mb.ashx
--------------------------------------------------------
Captain, Fauntleroy Dye found guilty in June 1781 at Leedstown, Virginia. He was age 39 years old when he went to Military Prison. How long did he serve?" Possibly 4 years.

He had been captured by the British and we don't know how long he was held by the British previously.

He had been a Capt. in Virginia at least since 1774. He made Captain the same day as 4 or 5 Fauntleroy men did.

I know he is listed in a book by ECKENRODES "Officers of the Revolution" Fauntleroy (Fantelyroy) Dye

---------------------------------------------------------

"Virginian's in the Revolutionary War"

Other proof at the Virginia State Library. Virginia State papers, 145-146......169-170

Front Page and Book 2, page 155

Dye, Fauntleroy, Richmond Co., Militia took oath as an officer Sept 2, 1776 
Dye, Fauntleroy (I34554073461)
 
23
Tomokichi Shimono and his wife Toki sailed from Yamaguchi, Japan to Hawaii on 17 June 1890 aboard the Sagami Maru.



http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=shimono&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSst=13&GScnty=542&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=89550468&df=all&

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=shimono&GSfn=toki&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSst=13&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=117950686&df=all&

The ashes of Tomokichi and Toki Shimono were buried at Oahu Cemetery in Honolulu as well as the Alae Cemetery in Wainaku, Hawaii County, Hawaii.




27 January 1920 census of Kapaau Village, Hawaii County, HI, found the Shimono and Sewaki families living in dwelling #213. Ryojiro Sewaki said that he had immigrated to the United States in 1906. Toki Shimono said that she had immigrated to the United States in 1895:

Ryojiro Sewaki 33 Japan Japan Japan - Tailor, Tailor shop
Turu Sewaki 19 HI Japan Japan - Wife
Hiroko Sewaki 2 9/12 HI Japan HI - Daughter
Yokiko Sewaki 9/12 HI Japan HI - Daughter
Toki Simono 54 Japan Japan Japan - Mother-in-law, Widow
Kanji Simono 22 HI Japan Japan - Brother-in-law, Single, Laborer - Private family 
Aketa, Toki (I34554072841)
 
24 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554072217)
 
25
William enlisted in the Pennsylvania Infantry at the outbreak of the Revolutionary War. Private PS William Miller was with the 3rd Pennsylvania Brigade, 2nd Division, at Valley Forge, PA, from Dec 1777 to June 1778. His name appears on the Valley Forge Muster Roll Data Sheets under both Captain John Davis' Company and Captain Thomas L. Moore's Company. The 3rd Pennsylvania Brigade, which was organized in January and February of 1776 at Philadelphia, entered Valley Forge with 212 men assigned and 116 fit for duty and left Valley Forge with 194 men assigned and 107 fit for duty. Previous engagements included the defense of Canada, Lake Champlain, Northern New Jersey, the defense of Philadelphia and Philadelphia-Monmouth.

http://valleyforgemusterroll.org/muster.asp?id=PA04521

William also served at the Siege of Yorktown in 1781, to within a few days of the surrender of British General Lord Cornwallice, when he received word of the death of his father at Germantown, PA (now a subdivision of Philadelphia). He received a Leave of Absence to attend his father's funeral which was written on a sheet of blue tinted dispatch paper and signed "G. Washington, Commanding, American Forces".

After the war, he married Rachel Art. Several years later, after his mother died, he moved his family to Ohio and settled on the Miami River near Dayton. In 1816, he again moved his family to Illinois, crossing the Wabash River near Vincennes, IN, and settled at Hogues Prairie, near the present site of Russelville, IL. He died there in the Fall of 1818.

According to page 55 of "Pioneer Life in Dayton and Vicinity 1796-1840" by John F. Edgar, 1896, reprinted by Higgonson Book Company. (Higgonsonbooks.com), "John Miller came to Dayton in 1799. He was born in Pennsylvania, 30 December 1766 and died 17 October 1825. After his death, his family moved to Indiana or Illinois".

Page 85 states "The third term of court was held in June, 1804, and the following are extracts from the docket: Came a Grand Jury, to wit: John Gerard, James Gillespie, James Thompson, James Russel, Nathaniel Knotts, James Miller, Sr., Edmond Munger, John Bradford, James Scott, Michael Moyer, John Noop, Shadrach Hudson, and John Mikesell; found no bills".

Page 252 states "As early as 1805 the Rev William Robertson, Dr. John Elliot, William Miller, Benjamin Van Cleve, and John Folkerth secured from the Legislature an act of incorporation for the Dayton Library Association, the first act of the kind passed in Ohio. It was sustained by voluntary subscription and a fine assortment of books was collected for that day; but during 1835, when times were hard and money scarce, the subscriptions failed, and the library was sold at auction from the clerks office on September 12".

Note: John F. Edgar was the son of Robert Edgar, a settler who arrived during Daytons first year (1796). The author personally knew some of the original settlers, and was thus urged to write about the early days for the Dayton, Ohio centennial (1896).

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



1818 census of Crawford County, IL, found William Miller and nine family members.

Notation on William and Rachael (Art) Miller appears on page 503 of "Portrait and Biographical Album of Coles County, Ill." Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887.

------------------------------------

https://www.daytonhistorybooks.com/page/page/3422169.htm 
Miller, William J. (I34554067965)
 
26





23 September 1850 census of Adams, Decatur County, IN, found the Redlin family living in dwelling #259:

Stephen Ridlin 62 ME - Farmer
Ann Ridlin 56 Unknown
Stephen Ridlin 21 IN - Not employed
Talbott Ridlin 16 IN - Farmer
Abrahem Ridlin 87 ME - Farmer




1860 census of Willow Hill, Jasper County, IL, found the Ridlen family living in dwelling #1501:

Stephen Ridlen 71 MA - Farmer
Ann Ridlen 68 PA



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Birth: Dec. 7, 1790
Death: Jan. 15, 1870

Inscription: "Age 79 years, 1 month, 8 days". Note Birth date calculated using death date and age. This entry was not placed here by myself, and obviously taken from the cemetery book as no headstone has been located.

She was born in South Huntington Twp, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania; the daughter of James Belveal/Bellville and Ann Wilson.

She was united in marriage to Stephen Ridlen on December 27, 1813, in Campbell County, Kentucky. To this union, 8 known children were born: Cynthia Ann, Lydia M., John Stephen Ridlen, Ruth Ridlen, Abraham Ridlen, James Bellville Ridlen, Stephen Ridlen and Talbott Ridlen.

Burial: Todd Cemetery, Jasper County, Illinois, USA 
Belville, Ann (I34554072315)
 
27





Sarah Dunbar, wife of James Art, was the daughter of Andrew Dunbar and Deborah Mitchell who married in Winchester, Virginia in 1779.

The 1894 Portrait and Biographical Record of the Scioto Valley, Ohio contains a bio of David Dunbar, grandson of Andrew, and the article mentions Andrew's children....[see pages 218-221]...."...his children were as follows.....Sarah, wife of a Mr. Art, of Fleming county, Kentucky....."

Here is a link to the book at Google books [search for Dunbar]: http://books.google.com/books/about/Portrait_and_Biographical_Record_of_the.html?id=X9oyAQAAMAAJ Thought this might help someone in the future. 
Dunbar, Sarah (I34554069401)
 
28




19 June 1900 census of Glenco, Payne County, OK, found newlyweds Albert and wife Rebecca living in dwelling #194. Albert and Rebecca said that they had been married less than a year and had no children:

Albert Sterling 6/1873 26 KS IN IL
Rebecca E. 7/1869 30 IA IN IA 
Quinnett, Rebecca Ellen (I34554068973)
 
29




25 June 1900 census of Township 24 N Range 20 E, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory, found the Mantooth family living in dwelling #69, next door to Mary's mother Sarah Garbarino and family in dwelling #68. William and Mary said that they had been married 7 years and all 4 of their children were still living:

William Mantooth 7/1859 40 MO TN TN - Farmer, White
Mary Mantooth 4/1863 37 MO Italy OK - Wife, Indian
Edna Mantooth 5/1893 7 OK MO MO - Daughter, Indian
Kate Mantooth 11/1894 5 OK MO MO - Daughter, Indian
Sallie Mantooth 2/1896 4 OK MO MO - Daughter, Indian
Susie Mantooth 2/1900 3/12 OK MO MO - Daughter, Indian
Martha Garbrino 9/1865 34 OK Italy OK - Sister-in-law, Single, Indian



20 Jan 1920 census of Township 8, Craig County, OK, found the McKisick family living in dwelling #162:

Greer McKisick 28 OK AR AR - Farmer
Kathereine G. 24 OK KS OK
Edgar G. 5 OK OK OK
Lillian A. 4 OK OK OK


15 April 1930 census of Township 8, Craig County, OK, found the McKissick family living in dwelling #145. Greer and Kate said that they were first married at ages 20 and 18 respectively. The census also noted that Kate and her 2 children were of mixed-blood Cherokee ancestry:

Greer McKissick 39 AR AR AR - Farmer
Kate 35 OK
Edgar 15 OK - Farm laborer
La Dona 14 OK - Farm laborer (this is probably Lillian)



6 April 1940 census of Beaty, Delaware County, OK, found the McKissick family living in dwelling #31. They said that they lived at the same place on 1 April 1935:

Kate McKissick 45 OK - Head, Widow, Completed 1 year of high school education, Farm laborer
Edgar G. McKissick 25 OK - Son, Single, Completed 4 years of high school education, Farmer
Ladonna McKissick 24 OK - Daughter, Single, Completed 3 years of high school education, Farm laborer 
Mantooth, Catherine Garbarino (I34554072117)
 
30



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Baptist Church: Res. Wichita, Ks.: Worked at Boeing Aircraft, 20 yrs. Layed Off. worked at trucking and Furniture moving until retirement.: U.S. Navy WWII, 'Cook': Baptist Church:



Obituary -

In Memory of James Edward Robinson

September 20, 1922 - October 23, 2012


Obituary

Robinson, James Edward "Jim," 90, passed away October 23, 2012. Jim was a proud Navy submariner on the U.S.S. Skate #305, WWII veteran, retired flight engineer from Beech Aircraft and a member of American Legion He was preceded in death by his wife Esther Grace in 2007, son James Samuel in 2003 and 3 sisters. He is survived by daughter, Carol "Susie" (Harry) Bayouth of Wichita; 2 brothers, Robert (Sandy), Charles (Carolyn); 2 sisters, Betty (Howard), Shirley (Danny) and special sister-in-law, Connie Nussman. Viewing is Monday 1 to 8 pm and funeral service is 10:00 am Tuesday, Oct. 30 at Resthaven Mortuary. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be sent to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

http://obits.dignitymemorial.com/dignity-memorial/obituary.aspx?n=James-Robinson&lc=4071&pid=160668534&mid=5285991&locale=en_US 
Robinson, James Edward (I34554076129)
 
31



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CEBURN J. DAVIS was born in what is now Clinton Co., Ky on 29 Dec 1825. He never went to a public school. He and his family lived in log house. In October, 1843 he married Miss Virginia Young. With five children, Parker, George, Haywood, Melvina and Evaline, they left Kentucky on 8th of May 1856, leaving one child Alice, a little over a year old, there (Beths note: Alice died in 1849 at 1 year and 13 days old, which is why they didnt bring her with them. Im not sure why the author didnt state that instead of suggesting that they left her behind).

They went to Knox County, Illinois, reaching there May 29, 1856. They lived there two years, leaving there Aril 9, 1858 for Putnam Co., Missouri, landing there 22 Apr 1858. They settled on the Mark Crabtree place, on the northwest corner of which the Davis Schoolhouse was built, now called Victory. During the first year in Putnam, Ceburn gave one acre of his land for a school house site to belong to the district as long as it was used for that purpose. For this 80 acres and 10 acres timber disconnected, he gave a horse and wagon and a small amount of money, all valued at $200. They lived there till the fall of 1865.

In (illegible), they bought 40 acres where Benton Spaw lived and 40 acres south of the 80 acres on which they lived. In the fall of 1865, they moved to the place where Mr. Spaw lived and for those two forties he gave $300, all in trade. They lived there till 1872, when he bought the place where a man by the name of Jones lived, for $1200. The rest of Ceburn and Virginias children were born here; Sarah, Ben, Arthur, Lizzie and Absalom. Ceburn was still living in 1901.

[goes into a paragraph about the wild game in the area - nothing specific and nothing to do with family history]

Ceburn J. Davis enlisted under Capt. Green Maize in Co. E, 4th Regt, E.M.M. He was in the Battle at Lancaster where a negro non-combatant and a few bush-whackers were killed. Later he was in Capt. George W. Ledfords Company, under Col. W.A. Shelton. They were stationed at Macon County and points along the Missouri River. They guarded towns and railroads, but were in no actual battle.

http://beth0607.wordpress.com/2012/07/31/the-davis-family-of-kentucky/ 
Davis, Ceburn Jefferson (I34554074765)
 
32



1 June 1880 census of Sharon (Dist 122), LeSueur County, MN, found Cassandra and her family living in dwelling #17:

Albert Case 38 OH NY NY
Cass A. 28 OH OH PA
Perry 8 IL
Anna 6 IL
Purley 3 IL
Harry 6/12 MN



1 June 1900 census of St. George, Benton County, MN, found the Case family living in dwelling #9:

Albert Case 8/1837 63 OH NY PA farmer
Cassandra 12/1850 49 OH NY PA
Perry 12/1871 28 IL OH OH
Nancy 9/1874 25 IL OH OH
Harry A. 10/1878 21 IL OH OH
Maggie B. 9/1881 18 IL OH OH
Mary E. 12/1883 16 IL OH OH
Frank W. 3/1888 12 MN OH OH



15 April 1910 census of St. George, Benton County, MN, found the Case family living in dwelling #2. Cassandra said that 7 of her 9 children were still living:

Cass Andra Case 58 OH NY PA - Widow, Farmer
Perry 38 IL OH OH - Single, Farmer
Maggie 28 MN OH OH - Single
Frank 22 MN OH OH - Single, Farm laborer 
Case, Perry (I34554068925)
 
33



11 May 1910 census of White Cross, Ada County, ID, found the Weidman family living in dwelling #7. John and Cora said that they had been married 4 years and both of their children were still living:

John Weidman 30 VA -- -- - Farming
Cora Weidman 28 IL OH NY - Wife
Viola C. Weidman 2 IL VA IL - Daughter
Evla L. Weidman 9/12 IL VA IL - Daughter




3 March 1920 census of Fair Ground, Ada County, ID, found the Weidman family living in dwelling #250 on Franklin Road:

John Weidman 40 VA -- -- - Herder, Sheep ranch
Cora Weidman 38 IL OH OH - Wife
Viola C. Weidman 12 IL VA IL - Daughter
Eva L. Weidman 10 IL VA IL - Daughter




4 April 1930 census of Boise, Ada County, ID, found the Weidman family living at 622 State Street. John and Cora said that they were first married at ages 26 and 23 respectively:

John Weidman 50 VA US US - Herder, Sheep camp
Cora Weidman 48 IL NY NY - Wife
Cora Weidman 20 IL VA IL - Daughter, Single 
Case, Cora (I34554068897)
 
34



11 May 1910 census of White Cross, Ada County, ID, found the Weidman family living in dwelling #7. John and Cora said that they had been married 4 years and both of their children were still living:

John Weidman 30 VA -- -- - Farming
Cora Weidman 28 IL OH NY - Wife
Viola C. Weidman 2 IL VA IL - Daughter
Evla L. Weidman 9/12 IL VA IL - Daughter




3 March 1920 census of Fair Ground, Ada County, ID, found the Weidman family living in dwelling #250 on Franklin Road:

John Weidman 40 VA -- -- - Herder, Sheep ranch
Cora Weidman 38 IL OH OH - Wife
Viola C. Weidman 12 IL VA IL - Daughter
Eva L. Weidman 10 IL VA IL - Daughter 
Weidman, Viola Christina (I34554072473)
 
35



11 May 1910 census of White Cross, Ada County, ID, found the Weidman family living in dwelling #7. John and Cora said that they had been married 4 years and both of their children were still living:

John Weidman 30 VA -- -- - Farming
Cora Weidman 28 IL OH NY - Wife
Viola C. Weidman 2 IL VA IL - Daughter
Evla L. Weidman 9/12 IL VA IL - Daughter




3 March 1920 census of Fair Ground, Ada County, ID, found the Weidman family living in dwelling #250 on Franklin Road:

John Weidman 40 VA -- -- - Herder, Sheep ranch
Cora Weidman 38 IL OH OH - Wife
Viola C. Weidman 12 IL VA IL - Daughter
Eva L. Weidman 10 IL VA IL - Daughter



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Obituary -

Eva Lorraine Potter, born August 15, 1909 in Divernon, IL, a resident of Vancouver since 1943, passed away Sunday, August 2, 2015 at Kindred Care in Vancouver.

Eva had a long career with government services, having worked for the Department of Agriculture and Interior; during World War II, with the Department of Commerce, Army and Air Force, and finally retiring from the US Forestry Service.

Over the years, Eva was a member of the American Business Women's Association, Oregon Art Association, National Watercolor Society, and a volunteer with the American Red Cross, and Parks and Recreation. She was also a member of the Vancouver Heights United Methodist Church.

Eva is survived by her daughter, Kay Eckstrom of Vancouver; sons, Richard Potter of Battleground, Dean Potter of Vancouver and Dale Potter of Sherwood, OR; 16 grandchildren; 23 great-grandchildren; and 2 great-great grandchildren.

A celebration of life for Eva will be held from 11:00 am-3:00 pm, Saturday, August 15th at the International Association of Fire Fighters, local 452, 2807 NW Fruit Valley Rd., Vancouver, WA 98660.

In lieu of flower memorial donations may be made to: The American Red Cross or the Wounded Warrior Project.


http://obits.dignitymemorial.com/dignity-memorial/obituary.aspx?n=Eva-Potter&lc=7547&pid=175434611&mid=6543444#


http://obits.columbian.com/obituaries/columbian/obituary.aspx?n=eva-lorraine-potter&pid=175464958 
Weidman, Eva Lorraine (I34554072475)
 
36



17 June 1880 census of Richland, Putnam County, MO, found the Guffey family living in dwelling #149:

William Gufey 35 MO TN IN - Farmer
Nancy J. 33 MO KY KY
Franklin W. 14 MO MO MO - Son
Sylvia A. 12 MO MO MO - Son
Isa Eva 5 MO MO MO - Daughter
Don Carlos 1 MO MO MO - Son


5 June 1900 census of Richland, Putnam County, MO, found the Guffey family living in dwelling #45. William and Nancy said that they had been married 35 years and all 4 of their children were still living:

William Guffey 1/1845 55 MO TN IN Farmer
Nancy J. 8/1846 53 MO KY KY
Don C. 11/1878 21 MO MO MO
Wm. A. Stockton 3/1886 14 MO TN MO Nephew, Farm laborer
August Meyer 4/1879 21 MO DEN IA Servant, Farm laborer



In his WWI Draft Registration Card dated 12 September 1918, Don Carlos Guffey said that he was born 8 November 1878. He was living with his wife Leone Thomas Guffey at 4129 Cambridge Avenue in Rosedale, Wyandotte County, KS. He was employed as a physician at 909 Waldheim Building in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri.



2 January 1920 census of Rosedale, Wyandotte County, KS, found the Guffey family living in dwelling #4129 on Cambridge Avenue:

Don Carlos Guffey 41 MO MO MO - Physician, General practice
Leone S. 37 MO MO MO
Marian 10 KS MO MO - Daughter
Helen 4 6/12 KS MO MO - Daughter


19 April 1930 census of Kansas City, Jackson County, MO, found the Guffey family living at 1008 Valentine Road. Don Carlos and Sallie said that they were first married at ages 22 and 19 respectively:

Don Carlos Guffey 51 MO MO MO - Physician, General practice
Sallie Leone Guffey 48 MO MO MO - Wife
Helen Leone Guffey 14 KS MO MO - Daughter
Nova T. Hutchinson 51 MO MO MO - Sister-in-law, Widow, Nurse


Don Carlos Guffey (age 74 born Missouri) and wife Sallie Thomas Guffey (age 72 born Missouri) sailed aboard the S. S. Queen Mary departing Cherbourg, France, on 6 August 1953 and arriving New York, New York, on 11 August 1953.
They showed their home address as 1008 Valentine Road in Kansas City, Missouri.




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Dr. Don Carlos Guffey, professor of obstetrics and gynecology in the Kansas University School of Medicine, lived near KUs Goat Hill campus and walked to work. Along his journey, Guffey passed through a relatively level 15-acre expanse owned by C.E. and Eliza Kern. Situated less than a mile south of Goat Hill at 39th and Rainbow Boulevard, and close to an interurban railway line that offered a direct connection to Lawrence, this property was known as the Kern tract. Guffey became convinced it was the perfect spot for the new location the governor wanted for the Medical School. Assigned to investigate the matter further, Guffey found out that the owners would reduce their $75,000 asking price for the land to $65,000 if it would become the location for the KU School of Medicine.

http://kuhistory.com/articles/we-cant-lose-the-medical-school/


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http://www.kshs.org/publicat/history/1992spring_king.pdf


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In 1928 in Kansas City, Hemingway gained a son and a novel insight

By BRIAN BURNES - The Kansas City Star
Date: 06/27/99 00:02

Ernest Hemingway faced two deadlines in June 1928.

One involved his unborn child. Hemingway's second wife, Pauline, was eight months pregnant.

The other involved his current manuscript.

As yet untitled, Hemingway had begun his story several months before in Paris. In it, a laconic, almost numb World War I ambulance driver is wounded. He begins an affair with a nurse in a Milan hospital. Soon the nurse is pregnant.

By June Hemingway wasn't sure how the novel, already being considered for serialization, would end.

But both deadlines would be met -- not in Paris, or in Milan -- but in Kansas City in the summer of 1928. This was the city where Hemingway became a journalist as a teen-ager a decade earlier and to which he would return from time to time for brief stays, even as he became a writer of almost unprecedented fame.

The book was published in 1929, 70 years ago, under the title A Farewell to Arms. The novel, perhaps Hemingway's most celebrated and examined, achieves an emotional climax with the difficult labor and the Caesarean delivery of the nurse Catherine Barkley's stillborn child.

Then Catherine dies.

Evidence suggests that Hemingway assembled the book's opening and middle passages from a smorgasboard of historical events and personal experiences. But the arrival of the author's real-life child, Patrick, apparently proved vivid to Hemingway, who weeks later incorporated an anxious delivery room drama into his novel's conclusion.

On June 28, 1928, Patrick Hemingway was delivered by Caesarean section at old Research Hospital.

Pauline had been in labor 18 hours. Her husband, who had missed the birth of his first son in 1923 while on assignment for the Toronto Star, may well have been riveted by the experience.

"Obviously, if my mother hadn't undergone that business here in Kansas City, my father wouldn't have written with as much detail and insight as he did," Patrick Hemingway said during a recent Kansas City visit.

Michael Reynolds, Hemingway biographer, goes further.

In Hemingway: The American Homecoming, the third volume in his five-book series on the author, Reynolds maintains that two events in 1928 prompted and ended A Farewell to Arms: an accident in Paris in March, when a falling bathroom skylight left a deep cut in Hemingway's forehead, and his son's Caesarean delivery that June.

The falling skylight roused Hemingway out of a writing block. It also, Reynolds said, seemed to spur him to confront the trauma he experienced driving an American Red Cross ambulance during World War I. Hemingway had been circling this material in his fiction and journalism for several years.

The birth of his son, meanwhile, gave Hemingway a conclusion to the book, as well as the verisimilitude the writer so prized.

"Down below, under the light, the doctor was sewing up the great long, forcep-spread, thick-edged, wound," Frederic Henry narrates in Chapter 41 of the novel. " ... I do not think I could have watched them cut, but I watched the wound closed into a high welted ridge with quick skillful-looking stitches like a cobbler's, and was glad."

The detailed description of the procedure suggests that Hemingway witnessed Patrick's birth.

Through close analysis of the novel and other materials, Reynolds also has concluded that before Hemingway arrived in Kansas City, he had not decided on any particular ending for the novel.

"Hemingway tended to avoid planning ahead, saying that it would ruin the story for him," Reynolds said.

The book originally might have ended with Henry's plunge into the Tagliamento River in Italy, as he tried to escape troops preparing to shoot him as a spy.

But the nature of Patrick's arrival probably changed that, Reynolds said.

"I still believe," Reynolds said, "that Pauline's operation was what triggered the ending."

`All those things'

The Hemingways arrived in Kansas City on June 14, 1928, because they wanted to have the child here.

The author's distractions were many. On June 15 he visited the Republican National Convention, then under way at Kansas City's convention hall.

There were visits to Don Carlos Guffey, the Kansas City obstetrician they chose to deliver the child. There were letters to answer from Hemingway friends in Paris as well as Maxwell Perkins, Hemingway's editor in New York.

Yet Hemingway continued thinking and writing about northern Italy during the autumn of 1917, keeping his focus on Frederic and Catherine.

"What I find incredible is all those things happening just when he really whipped that book into shape," Patrick said. "It just shows you that when people are really good, they can concentrate and get the work done no matter what the circumstances."

After Patrick's birth, the Hemingways stayed in Kansas City until mother and son were strong enough to travel. They left for her family's home in Piggott, Ark., on or around July 20.

During the preceding 35 days, Hemingway wrote the bulk of the novel's Book 3. That section details Frederic Henry's flight during the Italian retreat following the late October, 1917 breakthrough of Austrian and German troops at Caporetto, on the Isonzo River northwest of Venice.

"This narrative is often cited as the most compelling section of the novel," Reynolds said.

Hemingway awoke every morning to a warm and humid Kansas City. Then he sat down and summoned forth a cool autumn rain in northern Italy in 1917.

He achieved this through research -- checking maps and war histories -- and the distillation of personal experience.

One peril of reading Hemingway is just how close the arc of his life parallels those of his more memorable characters. The temptation is to read Hemingway fiction as pure biography.

The line between novel and memoir especially blurs in A Farewell to Arms. Hemingway, who himself drove an ambulance in Italy, was both wounded and in love with a hospital nurse in 1918.

But as Reynolds points out, Hemingway was no Frederic Henry.

A Farewell to Arms begins in 1915. The book's opening pages include Frederic's famous description of the marching soldiers whose loads of ammunition bundled beneath their capes make them appear "as though they were six months gone with child."

Hemingway never saw Italy until 1918. Nor had he experienced the battles Frederic describes or seen the terrain of Book 3.

Yet the events he invented while living in Kansas City were so realistic that Mussolini's Italian fascist government banned A Farewell to Arms in Italy.

Every step in the retreat, Reynolds said, is "incredibly accurate in its details, down to the specific weather, the various routes taken and the condition of the roads."

While Hemingway throughout the 1920s schooled himself in the events of the war, it's also likely that the author continued his research of the Italian retreat as late as June 1928.

"Somewhere in Kansas City he got some help," Reynolds said. "I would almost put money on it that he visited at The Star."

Then Patrick arrived.

Reading up

Hemingway, a doctor's son, knew about Caesarean sections. During the almost seven months he worked as a cub reporter at The Kansas City Star, in 1917 and 1918, part of his beat was General Hospital.

Yet his interest in obstretrics may have deepened after the war.

When he returned from Italy with his wounded leg, he spent his convalescence in his family's Oak Park, Ill., home. Hemingway read everything in his father's office. That included his father's copies of the American Medical Association journal.

That publication in 1918 and 1919 was full of articles on amputation, shock, traumatic neuroses and other miseries associated with the war.

There also were 35 papers on childbirth, as counted by Charles R. King, then a physician in the University of Kansas obstetrics and gynecology department, for a 1989 article in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

These included articles on stillbirth, birth trauma, nitrous oxide anesthesia for childbirth and hemorrhage as a cause of maternal death.

Of particular interest was a paper detailing the operative techniques and complications of Caesarean sections. The article was written by Joseph B. Delee, a Chicago obstretrician trained at the same medical college as Hemingway's father.

Today Patrick Hemingway remains unsure why his father didn't ask his own father -- Clarence Hemingway -- to deliver him. Clarence Hemingway delivered all six of his own children and in 1914 began listing obstetrics as his specialty.

"It was a touchy subject," Patrick Hemingway said. "It's an interesting family thing that I don't know the ins and outs of."

Kansas City relatives, meanwhile, may have suggested Guffey, an obstetrician thought to have performed the first Caesarean section in Kansas City.

Guffey, the first chairman of gynecology and obstetrics at the University of Kansas medicine school, also was an arts devotee. His Roanoke district neighbors included painter Thomas Hart Benton. Guffey also had a fondness for collecting fine editions of modern literature.

Such considerations may have helped Hemingway get into Pauline Hemingway's operating room on June 28.

"They finally had to open up Pauline up like a picador's horse to lift out Patrick," Hemingway wrote to a friend a month later. "It is a different feeling seeing tripas (insides) of a friend rather than those of a horse to whom you have never been introduced."

Birth, creation

By July 4, when Hemingway paused to write his mother and father, Patrick was thriving.

"He is very big strong and healthy," he wrote. "He is too big in fact as he nearly killed his mother. They had to do a cesaerian (sic) finally and I have been very worried about Pauline since but today her temperature is down to 99 and 8/10s and the gas distention is subsiding. She has suffered terribly."

About two weeks later, the Hemingways left for Piggott, Ark. Hemingway soon turned around and headed to Wyoming, where he began to compose the novel's ending.

Today a deluxe edition of A Farewell to Arms is held by the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Hemingway signed the book for Guffey, adding "with much admiration and grateful remembrance of a Caeserean(sic) that was beautifully done and turned out splendidly."

Patrick Hemingway never discussed with his father the precise role his birth played in the book's creation.

"I didn't know enough to ever ask him," the younger Hemingway said. "I should have.

"The best story I remember was later on, after my parents were divorced," Hemingway added. "Somehow my dad didn't remember my birthday, and my mother reminded him.

"He said, `Well, I always thought of it as more of an occasion for you than for him.' "

To reach Brian Burnes, history reporter for The Star, call (816) 234-7804 or send e-mail to bburnes@kcstar.com




Read more here: http://www.kcstar.com/hemingway/ehbirth.shtml#storylink=cpy 
Guffey, Don Carlos (I34554072756)
 
37 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554076120)
 
38


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JOHN H. SHORE came from Washington, Missouri, where he was born, September 6, 1841, and resided there until 1852, when he came across the plains to the land of gold and settled in Santa Clara County. He went to Oregon and Washington Territory in 1862, and to Sinaloa, Mexico, in 1863-1864. Came to Fresno County in 1864, where he resided ten years. He moved to Tulare County in 1874, where he at present is located, and is engaged in the business of stock-raising and general farming. He owns 500 acres of land, and raises hogs principally, generally having 200 or 300 at a time. Mr. Shore was one of the Board of Supervisors of Tulare County in 1880 and 1881. He married Miss Suan Haun in 1867, also from Missouri, and has seven children, named Emma Eugenia, born march 23, 1868; Elton Eugene, December 8, 1869; Isabella Jennie, June 21, 1872; Louis henry, June 24, 1874; John Elias, August 5, 1876; Ellen Susan, August 17, 1878; Seth Clarence, December 16, 1880.

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/34949348/person/18724575258/media/1?pgnum=1&pg=0&pgpl=pid%7cpgNum 
Shore, John Hyde (I34554075487)
 
39


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Frances Fanny (Gray) Cavener

By Ray Gold

Frances Fanny Gray was born October 18, 1820 in Tennessee, to Austin Gray, born February 10, 1788, and Mary Barnett Polly [Smiley] Gray, born April 22, 1792, [taken from the bible of Samuel Gray, in possession of Mrs. William Medearis Smith, Fayetteville, TN. On June 23, 1842 she married James Cavener in Marshall County, Tennessee. He was the son of Patrick and Keziah [Tucker] Cavener.

In the 1850 census of Marshall County, TN., they are listed with their children; James Cavener 28, VA., Frances 30, TN., Timothy 5, TN., Adaline 4, TN., Mary Polly 2, TN., Sarah E. 8/12, TN.. This same family is shown on the 1860 census of Christian County, Missouri. House #412, Fanny Cavener [WD] 37, TN., Real Estate taxes $120.00, Timothy 16, TN., Adaline 14, TN., Polly 12, TN., Clementine 4, TN., Josephine 3, TN., and Martha R., 1, born in Missouri. This census shows their youngest child to be one year old, and Fanny to be a widow. So James Cavener died in about 1859. The story has been handed down that he died en route to Missouri from Tennessee, and it is not known where he is buried.

Fanny [Gray] Cavener re-married in 1860, to Thomas Maples. Her oldest son, T.O. Timothy Cavener, married Martha Fugitt and lived all of his life at Union City, in Stone County. He was known as Uncle Tim Cavener. However, my father [Clarence Gold] told me that there were 2 Timothy Caveners at Union City, at the same time. During the Civil War, T.O. Cavener enlisted as T.O. Cavener from Crank, Missouri. It was called Crank, MO., then School, MO. and still later it was called Union City. A man named L.P. Crank, had a store and postoffice about one mile south and about one hundred yards west down the valley. That is where my grandparents; James Harvey Gold and Rozella Minerva Garouotte were married by L.P. Crank, in that grocery store in 1890. He later moved his postoffice and store to what was called Crank, MO. Then they built a schoolhouse, so it was called School, Missouri. Around the turn of the century the school was called the Reynolds School. And finally it was called Union City, that stuck until this day. My dad told me that Uncle Tim Cavener walked with sort of a leaned back limp, and everyone liked him. He also said that Tim Cavener was a tall skinny man. Uncle Tim Cavener and his wife Martha are both buried at the Wise Hill Cemetery, one mile north of Clever, in Christian County, MO.. Their children were:

[1] Nancy Elvaline Cavener, born Oct. 2, 1872, Stone County, Mo. and died Oct. 9, 1951 at Springfield, Missouri.
[2] Sarah F. Cavener, born March 1873, and died in 1959 at Halltown, MO., and buried at Wise Hill, Cemetery,
[3] George Wm. Cavener, born Oct. 22, 1874 Stone County, MO., and died December 1, 1897, buried at Wise Hill, Cemetery.
[4] Malinda Idella Cavener, born Sept. 23, 1876, Stone County, MO., and died October 19, 1966, Springfield, Greene County, MO. She married George W. Wilson.
[5] Albert Cavener, born 1879 and died at about one year of age.

Lucinda Adaline Cavener, was born April 18, 1844 in Marshall County, TN., and died October 29, 1898 in Stone County, MO. She married W.W. White and they are buried in the White Cemetery, 2 miles southeast of Union City, in Stone County, MO. They were the parents of 18 children, including 2 sets of twins. There are many descendants in this area.

Clementine Cavener was born in about 1852 and died in 1950, she is buried in the Crane Cemetery, in Stone county, MO.. She married Jake Saltkill and they have many descendants in this area.
Josephine Cavener, was born December 25, 1855, and died January 6, 1913, and she is buried in Wise Hill Cemetery , in Christian County, MO. She married Berry Damrill, and they had several children.
Rhoda Angeline Cavener, was born in 1859 in Missouri and died August 12, 1942, in Stone County, MO. She married Samuel Saltkill and they also had several children.

By her second marriage, Fanny [Gray] Cavener Maples and her husband Thomas Maples had two children; James S. Maples, and Curtis Maples.
James S. Maples was born in about 1862. He married Sarah E. Ellingsworth of Highlandville, MO. on December 29, 1887. And they had several children.
Curtis Maples was the youngest of the their children of Fanny [Cavener] Maples, he was born in about 1863 he was staying with his mother in the 1900 census of Christian County, and apparently stayed single until his mother died On July 7, 1901. Then he married Rhoda Webb, They are listed in the census of 1910 with several children. James S., and Curtis Maples were half-brothers to the children of Fanny and James Cavener.

NOTEJust a few days before Jack King died, I was at his place, about one mile southeast of Clever. Jack had an old house beside the road, it looked very old, so I asked him who was the last person to live in that old house, he said, Fanny Cavener was the last person to live there, so that is probably where she died, but left no trace of her grave in the local cemeteries. She is the grandmother of many descendants in this area.

http://schgs.weebly.com/frances-ldquofannyrdquo-gray-cavener.html 
Gray, Frances (I34554077780)
 
40


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THOMAS B. SHORE

THOMAS B. SHORE, of Millikin School District, is the owner of a beautiful and productive tract of 320 acres, on the Saratoga and Alviso Road, about three miles west of Santa Clara. The ranch, which is in a high state of cultivation, is principally devoted to the growing of hay and grain, for which it is well adapted. The proprietor also pays considerable attention to the raising of stock, both horses and cattle. Comfortable and well-ordered buildings, in connection with the general appearance of the ranch, denote a prosperous and successful result that must necessarily attend such intellingent and energetic efforts as have been put forth by its owner.


Mr. Shore was born in Washington County, Missouri, in 1834. His father, Thomas P. Shore, was a native of Kentucky, and his mother, Isabella (Hyde) Shore, of North Carolina. His early life was spent in work on his father's farm, and in receiving such learning as the schools of that new county afforded. In 1850 his father and himself (he being but fifteen years of age) started for California upon the overland trail. The pack train toiled and dragged along its weary journey, unattended by and starling incident, but undergoing the hardships constantly occurring on a trip of that character, until it reached Salt Lake City. Their provisions being exhausted, it was necessary that more should be procured here, and in order to do this the party to which the Shores were attached were forced to seek work from the Mormons, and thus earn the money needed to supply their wants. When leaving Salt Lake City, the company, against the advice of the Mormons, decided to enter California by the southern trail. This portion of their journey was attended by severe hardships and privations. Deep morasses and swamps, rendered almost impassable by rains, rugged mountain trails, swollen streams, and arid deserts devoid of water,---all these obstacles were finally overcome, and the party arrived safely in California, in the year mentioned above. Mr. Shore's previous outdoor life proved of great benefit to him on this expedition, readily enabling him to endure the exposure and hardships.

Soon after their arrival the father and son went to mining in what is now known as Nevada County. Not meeting with satisfactory results, they came into Santa Clara County in the autumn of 1850, and settled in the present Braly School District, about five miles northwest of Santa Clara, thus becoming early pioneers of the county. In 1851 Mr. Shore's father went East by the mail steamers, via the Isthmus route, and returned to California the following year with his family, making his second trip overland. He then settled in Mountain View, in this county, where he resided until his death, which occurred in 1873. The mother died about three years later, and both parents lie in Mountain View Cemetery. It is worthy of notice that both parents of Mr. Shore's wife are also buried in the cemetery. In 1860 Mr. Shore married Miss Agnes O. Bubb, daughter of William Bubb, of Mountain View. Six children have blessed this union, their name and ages (in 1888) being as follows: Paul Henry, twenty-five years of age; Oscar D., twenty years of age; Edith M., seventeeen years of age; Clara B. and Mary A., aged respectively fourteen and ten years.

SOURCE: Pen Pictures From The Garden of the World or Santa Clara County, California, Illustrated. - Edited by H.S.Foote.- Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1888. page 384 Transcribed by Roena Wilson

http://www.mariposaresearch.net/santaclararesearch/SCBIOS/tbshore.html 
Shore, Thomas Buckner (I34554075494)
 
41


1 April 1930 census of Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI found the Kodama family living in dwelling #10. Father Kaoru Kodama was employed as a salesman in a retail drug store.

Kaoru Kodama 42 Japan Japan Japan
Mitsue 34 Japan Japan Japan
Fumiko 15 HI Japan Japan
Taro 12 HI Japan Japan
Kazue 9 HI Japan Japan
Suzue 8 HI Japan Japan
Muneshige 5 HI Japan Japan
Sumie 4 HI Japan Japan
Nobuo 2 9/12 HI Japan Japan
Tatsuo 1 3/12 HI Japan Japan


The Kodama family made a visit to Japan in the summer of 1932. With the exception of oldest daughter Fumiko, the family returned to Honolulu, Hawaii, aboard the S.S. President McKinley, departing Kobe, Japan, on 22 August 1932 and arriving Honolulu, Hawaii, on 31 August 1932. Their permanent residence was listed as Wahiawa, Hawaii. The family members included:

Kaoru Kodama, age 44, drug-store keeper, born in Hiroshima, Japan
Mitsu Kodama, age 37, housewife, born in Hiroshima, Japan
Taro Kodama, age 16, student, born in Wahiawa, Hawaii
Kazue Kodama, age 12, student, born in Wahiawa, Hawaii
Suzue Kodama, age 10, student, born in Wahiawa, Hawaii
Muneshige Kodama, age 8, student, born in Wahiawa, Hawaii
Sumie Kodama, age 6, student, born in Wahiawa, Hawaii
Nobuo Kodama, age 5, student, born in Wahiawa, Hawaii
Tatsuo Kodama, age 4, child, born in Wahiawa, Hawaii


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Kaoru Kodama moved his entire family from Wahiawa, Hawaii, back to his hometown of Nakatsuwara (near Otake, now called Kono) in the Hiroshima Prefecture of Japan, near Iwakuni, in 1936. Oldest daughter Fumiko returned to Hawaii in 1938 to marry Lawrence Kunihisa. Son Taro Kodama returned to Hawaii on 31 January 1941. The rest of the children, except for Sumie and Muneshige, returned to Wahiawa in 1948, after World War II ended in August 1945. They all lived with the Kunihisa family and were employed in Kunihisa's department store in Wahiawa (Kassler), until they were able to strike out on their own.

During the period that the family was living in Nakatsuwara, their home, which was built on the bank of the adjacent river, was washed away by flood waters. They lost all of their possessions including family photos and momentos.


Several of the Kodama children (Kazue, Suzue, Nobuo and Tatsuo) sailed from Yokohama, Japan, to Honolulu, Hawaii, aboard the ship General G. H. Gordon. They left Yokohama on 30 April 1948 and arrived in Honolulu on 7 May 1948. They listed their home address as P.O. Box 927, Wahiawa, Oahu, Teritory of Hawaii. They said that they had last departed from the United States on 17 June 1936. 
Kodama, Nobuo (I34554071716)
 
42


1 June 1880 census of Girard, Macoupin County, IL, found the Snell family living in dwelling #69:

Henry Snell 43 OH VA VA - Farmer
Amanda Snell 39 OH PA PA - Wife
Anna M. Snell 20 OH OH OH - Daughter
Emma L. Snell 18 OH OH OH - Daughter
John F. Snell 17 OH OH OH - Son
Eliza O. Snell 12 IL OH OH - Daughter
Charles H. Snell 6 IL OH OH - Son



10 June 1900 census of Girard, Macoupin County, IL, found the Snell family living in dwelling #62. Charles and Nellie said that they had been married 5 years and Nellie said that 1 of her 4 children was still living:

Charles H. Snell 10/1873 26 IL OH OH - Farmer
Nellie M. Snell 5/1875 25 IL OH IL - Wife
Roxanna Snell 11/1895 4 IL IL IL - Daughter




20 April 1930 census of Victor, San Bernardino County, CA, found the Snell family living in dwelling #100. Charles and Nellie said that they were first married at ages 21 and 19 respectively:

Charles H. Snell 56 IL OH OH - Farmer
Nellie M. Snell 54 IL OH IL - Wife
Charles H. Snell 16 CA IL IL - Son 
Snell, Charles Henry (I34554069029)
 
43


1 June 1880 census of Locks, Elkhart County, IN, found the Heaton family living in dwelling #1:

Lafayette Heaton 36 NY NY NY Farmer
Janette 7 IN NY OH
Alverdia 5 IN NY OH
Harriet Barney 24 IN NY NY Cousin
Rosa Barney 6 IN NY NY Cousin 
Heaton, Alverda (I34554073232)
 
44


1 June 1900 census of Divernon, Sangamon County, IL, found the Crawford family living in dwelling #8. Joseph and Anna said that they had been married 4 years and both of their children were still living:

Joseph Crawford 12/1872 27 IL Scotland AR
Anna Crawford 11/1872 27 IL OH NY - Wife
Ray H. Crawford 12/1897 2 IL IL IL - Son
Lesley P. Crawford 4/1900 1/12 IL IL IL - Son
Elizabeth Crawford 3/1850 50 AR AR AR - Mother, Widow




23 April 1910 census of Newkirk, Kay County, OK, found the Crawford family living in dwelling #77. Joe and Anna said that they had been married 14 years and all 5 of their children were still living:

Joe B. Crawford 36 IL Scotland AR - Farmer
Annie Crawford 37 IL MO IL - Wife
Henry R. Crawford 12 IL IL IL - Son
Leslie P. Crawford 10 IL IL IL - Son
Alva O. Crawford 6 IL IL IL - Son
Joe M. Crawford 4 IL IL IL - Son
Ernest Crawford 2 IL IL IL - Son
Nancy Crawford 62 AR AR AR - Mother, Widow, All 3 children still living
John S. Crawford 33 IL Scotland AR - Brother, Farm laborer 
Crawford, Ray Henry (I34554072434)
 
45


1 June 1900 census of Divernon, Sangamon County, IL, found the Crawford family living in dwelling #8. Joseph and Anna said that they had been married 4 years and both of their children were still living:

Joseph Crawford 12/1872 27 IL Scotland AR
Anna Crawford 11/1872 27 IL OH NY - Wife
Ray H. Crawford 12/1897 2 IL IL IL - Son
Lesley P. Crawford 4/1900 1/12 IL IL IL - Son
Elizabeth Crawford 3/1850 50 AR AR AR - Mother, Widow




23 April 1910 census of Newkirk, Kay County, OK, found the Crawford family living in dwelling #77. Joe and Anna said that they had been married 14 years and all 5 of their children were still living:

Joe B. Crawford 36 IL Scotland AR - Farmer
Annie Crawford 37 IL MO IL - Wife
Henry R. Crawford 12 IL IL IL - Son
Leslie P. Crawford 10 IL IL IL - Son
Alva O. Crawford 6 IL IL IL - Son
Joe M. Crawford 4 IL IL IL - Son
Ernest Crawford 2 IL IL IL - Son
Nancy Crawford 62 AR AR AR - Mother, Widow, All 3 children still living
John S. Crawford 33 IL Scotland AR - Brother, Farm laborer



10 January 1920 census of Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS, found the Crawford family living at 775 Wacomor Street:

Joe Crawford 48 IL Scotland AR - Thresher
Annie Crawford 47 IL NY OH - Wife
Leslie Crawford 19 IL IL IL - Son, Single, Insurance agent
Alvie Crawford 16 IL IL IL - Son
Everett Crawford 13 IL IL IL - Son
Earnest Crawford 11 IL IL IL - Son
Carmen Crawford 8 OK IL IL - Daughter 
Crawford, Leslie P. (I34554072435)
 
46


1 June 1900 census of Jefferson, Polk County, MO, found the Heydon family living in dwelling #4. John and Sarah said that they had been married 34 years and all 3 of their children were still living. Leona said that she had been married 6 years and all 3 of her children were still living:

John W. Heydon 8/1837 62 NC NC NC - Farmer
Sarah F. Heydon 9/1837 62 NC NC NC - Wife
Leona A. Heydon 12/1866 33 MO NC NC - Daughter, Married
George W. Heydon 2/1877 23 MO NC NC - Son, Single, Farmer
Carl A. Heydon 12/1896 3 MO NC NC - Grandson
Stella E. Heydon 12/1897 2 MO NC NC - Grand daughter
Ruby F. Heydon 10/1899 7/12 MO NC NC - Grand daughter



3 May 1910 census of Jefferson, Polk County, MO, found the Heydon and Sea families living in dwelling #249. Leona said that she had been married 15 years, this being her first marriage, and all 3 of her children were still living:

John W. Heydon 72 NC NC NC - Widowed, Farmer
Leona Sea 43 MO NC NC - Daughter
Carl A. Sea 13 MO US MO - Grandson
Stella E. Sea 12 MO US MO - Grand daughter
Ruby F. Sea 10 MO US MO - Grand daughter



In his WWI Draft Registration Card dated 6 June 1918, Carl Albert Sea said that he was born 31 December 1896 in Bolivar, Polk County, Missouri. He was still living with his mother, Leona, in Bolivar, Missouri. The registrar noted that Carl was a "natural born cripple. Can't feed himself".



16 January 1920 census of Cliquot, Polk County, MO, found the Sea family living in dwelling #109:

Leona Sea 53 MO NC NC - Head, Married, Farmer
Carl Sea 23 MO KY MO - Son, Single, Invalid
Stella Sea 21 MO KY MO - Daughter, Single, Teacher - Public school
Ruby Sea 19 MO KY MO - Daughter, Single



21 April 1930 census of Cliquot, Polk County, MO, found the Sea family living in dwelling #29. Also in the household was daughter Ruby Rotramel and husband Burell. Leona said that she was first married at age 26. Burell and Ruby said that they were first married at ages 19 and 22 respectively:

Leona A. Sea 63 MO NC NC Divorced, no employment
Carl A. Sea 33 MO KY MO Single, no employment
Bural C. Rotramel 27 MO AR AR Farmer
Ruby F. Rotramel 30 MO KY MO 
Sea, Carl Albert (I34554071103)
 
47


1 June 1900 census of Jefferson, Polk County, MO, found the Heydon family living in dwelling #4. John and Sarah said that they had been married 34 years and all 3 of their children were still living. Leona said that she had been married 6 years and all 3 of her children were still living:

John W. Heydon 8/1837 62 NC NC NC - Farmer
Sarah F. Heydon 9/1837 62 NC NC NC - Wife
Leona A. Heydon 12/1866 33 MO NC NC - Daughter, Married
George W. Heydon 2/1877 23 MO NC NC - Son, Single, Farmer
Carl A. Heydon 12/1896 3 MO NC NC - Grandson
Stella E. Heydon 12/1897 2 MO NC NC - Grand daughter
Ruby F. Heydon 10/1899 7/12 MO NC NC - Grand daughter



3 May 1910 census of Jefferson, Polk County, MO, found the Heydon and Sea families living in dwelling #249. Leona said that she had been married 15 years, this being her first marriage, and all 3 of her children were still living:

John W. Heydon 72 NC NC NC - Widowed, Farmer
Leona Sea 43 MO NC NC - Daughter
Carl A. Sea 13 MO US MO - Grandson
Stella E. Sea 12 MO US MO - Grand daughter
Ruby F. Sea 10 MO US MO - Grand daughter



16 January 1920 census of Cliquot, Polk County, MO, found the Sea family living in dwelling #109:

Leona Sea 53 MO NC NC - Head, Married, Farmer
Carl Sea 23 MO KY MO - Son, Single, Invalid
Stella Sea 21 MO KY MO - Daughter, Single, Teacher - Public school
Ruby Sea 19 MO KY MO - Daughter, Single



21 April 1930 census of Cliquot, Polk County, MO, found the Sea family living in dwelling #29. Also in the household was daughter Ruby Rotramel and husband Burell. Leona said that she was first married at age 26. Burell and Ruby said that they were first married at ages 19 and 22 respectively:

Leona A. Sea 63 MO NC NC Divorced, no employment
Carl A. Sea 33 MO KY MO Single, no employment
Bural C. Rotramel 27 MO AR AR Farmer
Ruby F. Rotramel 30 MO KY MO 
Heydon, Leona A. (I34554071115)
 
48


1 June 1900 census of Liberty, Jasper County, IL, found the Sanders family living in dwelling #31. Al and Leona said that they had been married 8 years and all four of their children were still living. Also in the household was father-in-law Nelson Byrd and brother-in-law Ernest Byrd:

Al Sanders 4/1868 32 IN IN IN Teamster
Leona 2/1874 26 IL IL IL
Fred G. 10/1892 7 IL IN IL
Dallis B. 4/1894 6 IL IN IL
Halley A. 4/1896 4 IL IN IL
Margie 12/1897 2 IL IN IL
Nelson Byrd 10/1832 47 IL IL IL Binder Agent - widowed
Ernest Byrd 9/1897 12 IL IL IL




3 May 1910 census of Robinson, Crawford County, IL, found the Sanders family living at 406 1/12 South Cross Street. Leona said that 4 of her 5 chuildren were still living:

Leona Saunders 36 IL IL IL - Divorced, Dress maker - At home
Fred G. Saunders 17 IL IL IL - Son
Dallas D. Saunders 15 IL IL IL - Son
Halla A. Saunders 14 IL IL IL - Daughter
Mamie B. Saunders 12 IL IL IL - Daughter 
Saunders, Fred Golden (I34554072402)
 
49


1 June 1900 census of Liberty, Jasper County, IL, found the Sanders family living in dwelling #31. Al and Leona said that they had been married 8 years and all four of their children were still living. Also in the household was father-in-law Nelson Byrd and brother-in-law Ernest Byrd:

Al Sanders 4/1868 32 IN IN IN Teamster
Leona 2/1874 26 IL IL IL
Fred G. 10/1892 7 IL IN IL
Dallis B. 4/1894 6 IL IN IL
Halley A. 4/1896 4 IL IN IL
Margie 12/1897 2 IL IN IL
Nelson Byrd 10/1832 47 IL IL IL Binder Agent - widowed
Ernest Byrd 9/1897 12 IL IL IL




3 May 1910 census of Robinson, Crawford County, IL, found the Sanders family living at 406 1/12 South Cross Street. Leona said that 4 of her 5 chuildren were still living:

Leona Saunders 36 IL IL IL - Divorced, Dress maker - At home
Fred G. Saunders 17 IL IL IL - Son
Dallas D. Saunders 15 IL IL IL - Son
Halla A. Saunders 14 IL IL IL - Daughter
Mamie B. Saunders 12 IL IL IL - Daughter




9 April 1930 census of Houston, Harris County, TX, found the Saunders family living at 1401 Drew Avenue. Hallie and Violet said that they were first married at ages 35 and 25 respectively:

Leona B. Saunders 50 IL IL IL - Widow, Seamstress - Ladies wear
Hallie E. Saunders 39 IL IL IL - Son, Married, Automobile salesman
Violet Saunders 29 TX TX TX - Daughter-in-law, Office girl - Printing shop
Shirley Saunders 3 TX IL TX - Grand daughter 
Saunders, Hallie Avon (I34554072404)
 
50


1 June 1900 census of Sonoraville, Gordon County, GA, found the Byars family living in dwelling #3. William and Rachel said that they had been married 8 years and 4 of their 5 children were still living:

William A. Byars 5/1872 28 GA GA GA Farmer
Rachel L. 10/1871 28 GA GA SC
Lulu F. 12/1892 7 GA GA GA
Lillie M. 4/1894 6 GA GA GA
Bessie P. 8/1896 3 AL GA GA
Alice L. 8/1899 9/12 GA GA GA


1920 census of Stones, Clark County, KY, found Alice living with her sister's family in dwelling #51:

R. S. Parker 28 KY KY KY Farmer
Bessie 22 AL AL AL
Mildred 7 OK KY AL
Doris 5 OK KY AL
Keith 1 KY KY AL
Linnie Byars 18 AL AL AL Sister-in-law, Single


11 Apr 1930 census of Ojai, Ventura County, CA found Alice living with her sister's family in dwelling #179:

Rodney S. Parker 38 KY KY KY Chemist, oil field
Bessie 34 GA GA GA
Mildred P. 17 OK KY GA
Keith J. 15 OK KY GA
Alice L. Byars 24 GA GA GA Telephone operator, single


8 April 1940 census of Downieville, Sierra County, CA, found the Miller family living at 106 Commercial Street. They said that they lived in Hollywood, Los Angeles County, CA, on 15 April 1935:

Hebert Miller 35 AR - Completed 4 years of high school education, Miner - Gold mines, Earned $455 in past year
Alice L. Miller 35 GA - Completed 4 years of high school education
Valerie J. Miller 4 CA
Catleen A. Miller 2 CA 
Byars, Alice Lynn (I34554068420)
 

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