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5351 patricia arnold <parnold11@cox.net> 21 Nov 2002 Virginia, Pearl (I34554076490)
 
5352 Patrick is mentioned in Col. John H. Napier III's book, "Dr. Patrick Napier of Virginia: His Ancestors and Some Descendants."

One source says Patrick was born in London, England. Some say he descends from a long line of Scotish lords (lairds,) situated in Mechiston, Edinburgh, Scotland. Others say he descends from another line of Scotish nobles, those of Kilmehew.

Another branch of the Napiers became lords of Napier and Ettrick in 1627 with a seat at Thirlestane Castle. Later Napiers served in the Napoleonic Wars (there were six British generals and one admiral named Napier at that time,) and the 8th Lord Napier was captured during the American War of Independence.

The Napier clan motto is "Sans Tache," which means "Without Stain." An early spelling of the family name was Nae-Peer. Lt. Colonel John Hawkins Napier, III, of Ramer, Alabama, but then of Picayune, Mississippi (hereafter referred to for simplicity as JHN), in his book "Tha Hast Na Peer," (1967 ) amusingly recounts the tradition about one Egfirth (d. 1064), who was father of a son named Arkyll, who became father of a son of the same name, who in turn, had a son Alwyn. This Alwyn was the first of the ancient earls of "Levenax" (Lennox), now in Dumbartonshire, Scotland. Alwyn sent his son, Ethus (or Donald), to fight for the King of Scotland shortly before A.D. 1200. As the legend goes, Donald saved the day for his forces. Afterwards, the king, in handing out awards, is said to have announced, in good Scots-English dialect: 'Tha has all done valiantly this day, but there is one amongst thee who hath na peer as a fighter.' Then and there he commanded Donald, Alias Ethus, to accept the epithet "Na Peer" as a surname. Hence ... it is said ... "Napier of Lennox" was born!

Believed to have descended from the Celtic royal families through the Earls of Lennox, the name is carelessly thought by some to derive from the occupational name of "naperer" who looked after the linen in the royal household. However, the name is first recorded at the end of the 13th century when Malcolm, Earl of Lennox granted lands at Kilmahew in Dunbartonshire, to John de Naper. These lands were held by Napiers for 18 generations, finally being sold in 1820. Thus it is most erroneous to assume that these people of longstanding noble and royal position began as linen workers, or that the surname ever originated as anything of the kind.

One of Patrick's ancestors may have been Alexander Napier, who was the 1st Laird of Merchiston in Edinburgh, and who became Lord Provost of the city. Early in the 15th century, his son was wounded rescuing the widow of King James I from rebels, and James II made him Comptroller of the Royal Household in 1440. Alexander's grandson, John, was killed at the Battle of Sauchieburn in 1488. The next Laird of Merchiston and his son were both killed at the Battle of Flodden in 1513.

On 9 May 1649 in Edinburgh, Patrick was apprenticed to Alexander Pennycuik, chirurgeon. Patrick was also apprentice surgeon to Sir Alexander Leslie's troops, Battle of Dunbar. After 1650, he emigrated to Virginia with other Scottish Royalists. He was among the earliest Virginia doctors. On 25 Mar 1655 he was used as headright by Peter Ford. Settled in Queen's Creek, Hampton Parish, York County, Virginia, as Planter and Surgeon. He owned a 1500 acre plantation in Blisland Parish, New Kent County, VA.

His will was dated 26 Feb. 1668, and probated 12 Apr. 1669, naming his wife and children.

WILL of PATRICK NAPIER
York Co., VA 1668

In the name of God Amen.
I PATRICK NAPIER of the prsh of Hampton in the County of Yorke phisician being sicke and sane in body but thanks be to God in pfect mind and memory do make and declare this my last will & testament. I comend my soule into the hands of my most mercifull creator and preserveror in full assurance to have all my sins pardoned in and through the meritts of my only savour Jesus XX-& my body to be decently buried at the discretion of my dear wife ELIZABETH NAPIER. And for that portion of earthly goods wherewith it hath pleased God to endure mee I doe by these presents dispose
and bequeath of them as followeth. I doe by these presents give and bequeath unto my dear wife ELIZABETH NAPIER all that pcell of land lying in the prsh of Blessland in the county of New Kent in Virg containing by estimation fifteen hundred acres be it more or less as the same is situate and being in the prsh aforesd adjoining to the plantation of Major Hammond on the one side and Capt. George Lyddall on the other side To Have & to hold the said piece of land to my said deare wife ELIZABETH NAPIER for the home of her naturall life alsoe my will and pleasure is that my two deare children Robert Napier, Francis Napier shall have and enjoy the said piece of land or plantation in manner aforesaid as I doe hereby express that is to say I doe my these presents give and bequeath unto my dears sone Robert Napier the majority on one halfe of the said piece of land containing fifteen hundred acres as aforesaid to be divided equally at the discretion of my said deare wife ELIZABETH NAPIER. To have & to hold the said majority on halfe of the said piece of land unto my said deare sonne Robert Napier and his heirs forever. Also I dow by these presents give and bequeath unto my deare daughter Frances Napier the other majority or other halfe parte of the said plantation or piece of land containing as aforesaid and situate and being as aforeds to be layed out and separated from the other peace of land at the discretion of my said deare wife to have and to hold the said other parte or parcell of land to my sd deare daughter Frances Napier and her heirs forever. Also my will and pleasure is that if it should happen that my said Sonne Robert Napier should dye or depart this mortall life and leave no issue of his body lawfully begotten that then my will & pleasure is that my daughter Frances Napier shall have and enjoy the said halfe parte or piece of land that is hereby bequeathed to my sonne Robert. Also if it should happen that my said daughter Frances Napier should hapen to dye or depart this mortall life and leave noe issue lawfully begotten and that my said sonne Robert survive or any of heir issues, That then my will and pleasure is that my said sonne shall have and enjoy the same plan pcell of land bequeathed to my said daughter in as longe and ample manner and forme as my said daughter did could or might enjoy the same provided always notwithstanding that if it should happen that my said two children Robert and Frances should dye or depart this mortall life and leave noe issue behind then or either of them that then my will and pleasure is that the heirs of my sd deare wife ELIZABETH NAPIER shall & have & enjoy the same in as longe and ample manner as the heirs of my said sonne and daughter or either of them might have enjoyed the same. Also I doe by these presents bequeath all my moveable goods and coffills? specified in a certain Inventory hereunto annexed unto my deare wife & my two children equally to be divided amongst them share and share like and not otherwise. Alsoe I doe by these presents make and appoint my deare wife ELIZABETH NAPIER sole Executrix of this my last will and Testament. Also my desire is that my two very loving friends Mr. Thomas Ballard and Mr. James Vaulx will be overseers that this my will be performed according to the reale intents and purposes hereof and that they would give my said deare wife and children such assistance as they shall think fitt in the managing of this Estate alsoe I doe hereby further declare that the reall intent and meaning of this my will is that neither of my said children Robert or Frances shall be in possession of the said land or plantation or any pte or pcell thereof nor receive any profitts that shall accrue out of the same soo long as my said deare wife whall happen to live lastly I doe by these presents revoke all other wills herebefore made by me and declared this to be my last will and Testament
I witnessd whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seale this six and twentieth day of February one thousand six hundred sixty & Eight signed sealed and delivered in presence of
Frances Haddin PAT NAPIER SEALE
John Hungerford
Mathew Culler

Probate in Cur Com Ebon 12 Anno 1669 & Testaments Frances Hadden John
Hungerford & Mathew Culler it Recorded at due
& John Baskery to Clr Cur 
Napier, Dr. Patrick (I34554067565)
 
5353 Pennoyer

There were three Pennoyer brothers in England, in whom we are interested. It seems odd that no one, to my knowledge, has ever secured and published any information as to their parentage and ancestry. The College of Arms in London has a partial pedigree, to which I have added data, but it contains nothing at all about the antecedants. As we shall see later, there may have been a fourth brother.

In 1901, the late Henry F. Waters published, in two volumes, his "Genealogical Gleanings in England", and in volume 1, pages 503-506, presents the wills of William and Samuel Pennoyer, brothers, and their two widows. We are particularly interested in the will of William, whose legacy founded the Pennoyer Aid at Harvard.

Samuel, a merchant of London, had married Rose Hobson, and drew his will, 29 June 1652, proved 12 May 1654, mentioning his brother, William, and the latter's wife, Martha. Rose married, secondly as his second wife, Samuel Disbrow and died in Elsworth, Cambridgshire, 10 Dec. 1690, aged seventy-five, while Disbrow died there, 4 March 1698, aged eighty-two.

William had married Martha, daughter of John Josselyn, of Hide Hall, Sawbridgeworth, Herts., by his wife, Elizabeth Wiseman. As citizen and clothmaker of London, William Pennoyer made his will, 25 May 1670, proved 13 Feb. 1670-71.

In this instrument, he left Ð800 "to be sent over to the Corporation for the Propagation of the Gospel in New England", to the intent and purpose that its value in goods and commodities of that country "may upon sale thereof be delivered to Robert Pennoyer of Stamford of New England for the equal use and benefit of himself and each of his children; further to the intent and purpose that what shall be made thereof above the said eight hundred pounds value in the commodities of that country shall be and remain to his sister Elianor Reading and her husband Thomas Reading and all their children equally and indifferently".

He owned land and tenements in co. Norfolk, out of which Ð10 per annum was given to the Corporation for Propagation of the Gospel in New England and Ð34 per annum. with which "two fellows and two scholars forever shall be educated maintained and brought up in the college called Cambridge College in New England, of which I desire one of them, so often as occasion shall present, May be of the line or posterity of the said Robert Pennoyer, if they be capable of it and the other of the colony now or late called Newhaven Colony, if conveniently may be".

Harvard sold this Norfolk property only recently. The third brother, Robert Pennoyer, is the founder of the American branch; brief notes concerning him follow.

Robert Pennoyer, brother of William (the testator of 1670 and benefactor of Harvard College), a turner by trade, born perhaps in 1614, was alive in January 1677, then of Mamaroneck, Westchester Co., N.Y., and resided in Gravesend, Long Island, N.Y., Stamford, Conn., and Rye and Mamaroneck. He married, first, about 1652, an unknown wife, who became the mother of his children, and who died by 6 March 1671; and, secondly, after 1666, and before 6 March 1671, Elizabeth Scofield, widow of Richard Scofield of Stamford.

It has been thought that this Robert is identical with a Robert Pennaird, aged 21, who with a Thomas Pennaird, aged 10 (possibly a younger brother), came over on the Hopewell, of London, Thomas Babb, Master. She sailed about the middle of September and arrived in Boston, Mass., the latter part of November 1635. (Banks: 'Planters of the Commonwealth", 1930.) He was certainly the Robert Pennoyer, of Gravesend, Long Island, in 164-, and again in 1645. (Record, 16:99, 102.) 23 Aug. 1656 we learn that the lands of Robert Pennoyer, et als., at Gravesend were surveyed, from the Calendar of Dutch Ms., 189. (Ibid., 65:242.) 1 Aug. 1670 his daughter, Elizabeth "Penrye", was married to Richard Lownesbury, from Court of Assizes, 2;572. (O'Callaghan: "New York Marriages", 1860, 239.) 24 Dec. 1670 John Richbell, of Mamaroneck, with his wife, Ann, sold to Robert "Penoire". homelots, numbers 2 and 3, there, see Liber 1677-1683 [in Albany?]. (Record, 58:250.)

6 March 1671, the inventory was made or the estate of Richard Scofield, late of Stamford, deceased, filed 16 March 1671, which mentions the widow, now the wife of Robert "Penoyer". (Mead: Ms. "Fairfield Probate", 1:22.) The next record appears in Boston 18 Oct. 1671;

"I Robert Penoyer Late of Stamford doe ... Ordayne my. . . freind Jonathan Sellick to bee my ... Attourney to demand & receave for mee my full Legacy Left mee by my Brother mr William Penoyer Late of London ... as witnes my hand & scale in Rye this 18th of October 1671 ... Robert Penoire". Wit: John Richman, Miles Okely, and the mark of Nicolas Webster; attested 19 Oct. 1672 by Richman and Webster; recd. 20 April 1672. (Suffolk Deeds, 6:280.)

Further deeds are of interest in proving the names of his children:

8 Jan. 1671-72, Robert "Penoyer", of Mamaroneck conveyed property, purchased of Richbell, to his dearly beloved children: William and Thomas Penoyer; the cattle and household goods to be divded between said sons and daughter, Martha Penoyer; Robert was to have full management of all the property during his natural lifetime. Westchester Deeds, B:100. (Record, 58:351.) Another abstract of this deed gives the date as 18 Jan. 1671-72, calls the grantor "Penoyre", recites that he gave to children, William and Thomas, all rights to his estate, real and personal; to eldest son, William, two thirds of the land purchased of said Richbell, and for want of issue to son Thomas; daughter, Martha, also named. Westchester Deeds, B:100. (Ibid., 54:394.)

1 Jan. 1677, a statement that William Penoyer did bequeath to Walter Butler, of Greenwich Conn., son of Evan Butler, of Cursonn, in the county of Hereford, the sum of four score pounds, Westchester Deeds, at Albany, 4:26. (Ibid., 58.349.)

Recorded for Mr. George Heathcott, 7 Jan. 1677. "Whereas William Penoyer, Esq., citizen and clothworker of London, did make his last will in writing bearing date the five & twentieth day of May . . . 1670; and among other things ordered that Ð800 be laid out in merchandise fit for New England & sent over to the Corporation for the Propagation of the Gospel in New England; delivered to Robert Penoyer of Stratford [Stamford] for the benefit of himself & children & did appoint Richard Leton Esq., & Michael Davison, Esq., Executors; . . . the residue to Ellena. Reading & her children. The sd Michael Davison has since died. Now there is no such corporation in New England to which sd goods may be consigned & sold and proceeds divided amongst respective persons; neither can security be taken for children. Robert Penoyer is removed to Mamaroneck in New York State and hath only 4 living children, viz., Elizabeth Pennoyer, aged 24, William Pennoyer, aged 22, Thomas Pennoyer, aged 17, and Martha

Pennoyer, aged 11, under age, January 1677. Signed

Robert Pennoyer

Elizabeth Pennoyer, now Lounsbury

Wm. Will Penoyer"

Wit: William Dyre, George Kniffon, John Royse, William Hall, and Anthony Buckholm. Westchester Deeds, at Albany, 4:9. (Ibid., 58:349.)

29 Jan. 1677, Robert Penoyer, of Mamaroneck, Turner, William Penoyer, of the same place, son of the said Robert, with Richard Lounsbury, of Rye, Conn., and Elizabeth Lounsbury, his wife, oldest daughter of the said Robert, conveyed to Richard Leton, of London, England, and to George Heathcott, of Middlesex Co., England, mariner, by bond. Westchester Deeds, at Albany, 4:23. (Ibid., 58:349.)

There is mention in a deed, dated 2 April 1694, of land formerly in the possession of Robert Pennoyer and now in the possession of his son (not named). Westchester Deeds, B: 177. (Ibid., 54:394.) It would seem therefore that Robert was surely dead by April 1694.

Children by first wife, born in Stamford:


Elizabeth2, b. about 1652; m., Richard Lounsbury. See Lounsbury Notes. MARY -


William, b. about 1654; m. Mary ______. In 1698, a William "Peneor", was of Mamaroneck, and, in New Rochelle, a Robert "Peniore" (a footnote explains that Robert probably belonged to the Mamaroneck List); also another 1698 list, for New Rochelle, Mamaroneck, and Morisanna, gives a Robert "penneor", aged 17. 22 May 1702, William "Penior", of Mamaroneck, freeholder, for love a to his son and heir, Robert "Penoir", one half his land there; 2 March 1703, William Penoir, of same, for love deeds all his estate to his wife Mary, for her natural life; wit: Fred, and Elizabeth Platt and Benj. Collier; 26 June 1703, Eleazer Gedney, of same, shipwright, conveyed to William and Robert Penoyer, of same, 13 acres there, as laid out to William Penoyer. Westchester Deeds, G:222,287,311. (Ibid., 59:107; 51:42, 45; 56-.40; 52: 71, 321.)

Children:


Robert b. in 1681.


? Thomas.


Thomas. b. 29 March 1658; d. in Stamford 21 Nov. 1723; m. there, 22 May 1685, Lydia Knapp, b. about 1668 d. there 9 Feb. 1709-10, dau. of Moses and Abigail (Westcott) Knapp. I have further data.


Mary, b. 25 Nov. 1660i d. young


Martha, b. 26 Sept. 1664; living in 1677.


Abigail, b. 13 Get. 1666; d. young. 
Pennoyer, Elizabeth (I34554067431)
 
5354 Penny Carol Travis

Obituary:
Penny Travis Schnitzius, Aug. 6, 1943 - Nov. 10, 2003
Penny Carol Travis Schnitzius, 60, of Vallejo, died Monday at the home of her brother and
sister-in-law in Bedford, Va. Penny was born Aug. 6, 1942 in Vallejo, the daughter of
Dean O. Travis Sr. of Miami, Okla., and the late Rona Travis Biagi of Vallejo.
Those left to cherish her memory are her brother, Dean O. Travis Jr. of Bedford, Va; son,
Robert Maddox in Kaneohe, Hawaii; daughters, Rona Renea DelaCuesta of Pearl City,
Hawaii; Kimberly Gray of Cedar, Iowa; as well as several grandchildren and
great-grandchildren.
Penny worked at the Vallejo Elks Lodge No. 559 as head waitress for many years. She
was also a member of Vallejo Elks Lodge No. 559, Women of the Moose Chapter No.
315, Volunteer Horseman Napa Valley, Calif. Board of Directors, member of the
Bedford, Va. Host Lions Club.

div. 03/1975: 
Travis, Penny Carol (I34554075737)
 
5355 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554071783)
 
5356 Phillip Jackson (Jack) Riedesel

Phillip Jackson "Jack" Riedesel, 72, Fair Play, died at 7:55 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 22, 1999, at his home after a battle with cancer. He was born Feb. 23, 1927, in Nevada, the son of Phillip Marcus and Susie Eberle Riedesel. They moved to the Polk County area in 1937.
He was united in marriage to Effie Marie Rotramel on Dec. 22, 1948, and to this union were born one son and three daughters. An entrepreneur and self-made man in the construction business, he gave to many charities, some of which included a trust fund for the Fair Play School District, the Riedesel Charitable Trust for Community Services and, most recently, a donation of funds for a new senior citizens center in Bolivar. He was preceded in death by his parents; one sister, June Riedesel Pitts; and one daughter, Helen Louise Riedesel. Survivors include his wife, Effie Riedesel of the home; one son, Ed Riedesel and his wife, Barbara, of Goodson; two daughters, Sandra Parks and her husband, Owen, of Fair Play and Sherry Riedesel and her husband, Daniel Kauffman, of Otis, Ore.; five grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Also surviving are one brother, Dean Riedesel and his wife, Alyce; and three sisters, Maxine Christian and Gertrude Fellows of Bolivar and Harriet Edmondson of Eureka, Kan. In keeping with his request, his body was donated to the University of Health Sciences, Kansas City. No services are planned. Memorial contributions may be made to Citizens Memorial Hospital Hospice. Arrangements were under the direction of Pitts Chapel.

Res. Indianapolis, Ind.; Wichita, Ks.; Boliver, Mo.:
Obit
Harriet Edmondson of Eureka, Kan ; June Riedesel Pitts
Maxine Christian and Gertrude Fellows; Dean Riedesel and his wife, Alyce

Res. Indianapolis, Ind.; Wichita, Ks.; Boliver, Mo.: Obit Harriet Edmondson of Eureka, Kan ; June Riedesel Pitts Maxine Christian and Gertrude Fellows; Dean Riedesel and his wife, Alyce 
Riedesel, Phillip Jackson (I34554075891)
 
5357 Phineas served as the Governor of Connecticut from 1887 to 1889.


http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GScid=2155546&GRid=7372824&




31 Aug 1850 census of Ridgefield, Fairfield County, CT, found the Lounsbury family living in dwelling #80:

Nathan Lounsbury 43 Stamford, CT - Shoe Maker
Delia 41 Ridgefield, CT
William 19 NY - Shoe Maker
Matilda 21 NY
Sarah 17 NY
Ann E. 16 NY
George E. 12 NY
Phineas 9 Ridgefield, CT
Josephine 8 Ridgefield, CT
Joel L. Lockwood 22 NY City - Tailor


11 July 1870 census of Ridgefield, Fairfield County, CT, found the Lounsbury family living in dwelling #96:

Nathan Lounsbury 63 CT Farmer
Delia A. 61 NY
William Sherwood 13 CT
George Lounsbury 32 NY Boot Maker
Phineas C. Lounsbury 29 CT Boot Maker
Jane 28 NY



In his U.S. Passport Application dated 1 July 1879 for the State of New York, Phineas C. Chapman said that he was born 10 January 1841 in Ridgefield, CT. He stated his age as 38 years and his wife, Jennie, as 37 years. His physical description showed him at 5' 6" tall with black hair and grey eyes. His witness was his brother, George E. Lounsbury.

http://search.ancestry.com/iexec?htx=View&r=an&dbid=1174&iid=USM1372_230-0059&fn=Phineas+C&ln=Lounsbury&st=r&ssrc=&pid=1561129



24 June 1880 census of Ridgefield, Fairfield County, CT, found the Lounsbury family living in dwelling # 410:

Phineas C. Lounsbury 40 CT CT CT - Shoe Manufacturer
Jennie 39 NY NY NY


16 June 1900 census of Ridgefield, Fairfield County, CT, found the Lounsbury family living in dwelling #187. Phineas and Jennie said that they had been married 33 years and had no children:

Phineas C. Lounsbury 1/1841 59 CT CT NY - Banker
Jennie W. 7/1841 58 NY NH PA
Annie Howard 7/1849 50 NY - Companion
Maggie Evers 5/1863 37 Ireland - Cook
Katie Powers 7/1871 29 Ireland - Chambermaid
Willie Shea 2/1877 23 Ireland - Waitress
Mary Wagner 9/1863 36 Canada - Laundress


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LOUNSBURY, Phineas Chapman, governor of Connecticut, was born in Ridgefield, Conn., Jan. 10, 1841; son of Nathan and Delia (Scofield) Lounsbury. His father was a farmer. He was educated in the public schools of Ridgefield, and enlisted as a private in the 17th Connecticut volunteer infantry in 1861. He was obliged to retire from the army on account of serious illness, and with his brother, George E. Lounsbury, he engaged in the shoe manufacturing business in New Haven and South Norwalk, Conn. He was married in 1867 to Jennie, daughter of Neziah Wright. In 1885 he became president of the Merchants' Exchange National bank of New York city, of which he had been a director for some years. He was elected a Republican representative in the Connecticut legislature in 1874, and served as speaker. In 1886 he was the candidate of the Republican party for governor of Connecticut, and in the election, Nov. 2, 1886, he received 56,920 votes to 58,818 for Edward S. Cleveland, Democrat; 4699 for S. B. Forbes, Prohibitionist, and 2792 for H. C. Baker, labor candidate. There being no choice by the people, a majority being necessary, the legislature elected the Republican state ticket, and Mr. Lounsbury served as governor, 1887-89. He was elected a trustee of Wesleyan university in 1880, and received the degree of LL.D. from there in 1887.

From: Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Johnson, Rossiter, editor

http://www.history50states.com/CT-Fairfield-Ridgefield


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PHINEAS CHAPMAN LOUNSBURY, statesman, financier, and for many years president of The Merchants' Exchange National Bank of New York, was born Jan. 10, 1841, in Ridgefield, Conn., of good old colonial stock. His grandfather was a farmer but fought bravely throughout the War of the Revolution, while his father, who yet enjoys a hearty old age, devotes himself to agricultural pursuits.

The young man received his early education in the schools of his native State and showed a marked fondness for and proficiency in the classics, elocution and debates, his favorite study being mathematics. When the Civil War began, he enlisted as a private in the 17th Conn. Vol's, but was stricken down by sickness, which compelled his retirement. He was recommended for a pension but refused it. In spite of the fact that bad health debarred him from participation in the battles in which his regiment distinguished itself, he has never lost interest in his former comrades in arms and is an active member of Edwin D. Pickett Post No. 64, G. A. R. of Ridgefield.

When his old regiment dedicated a monument on the battlefield of Gettysburg, in July, 1884, the former private was orator of the day and delivered a touching and eloquent eulogy over the graves of the comrades, who gave up their lives in that hotly contested fight. His peroration was worthy of the occasion. It was couched in these words:

"If in the years to come, the North and South shall vie with each other in the bloodless battle of industry and patriotism, of social justice and political freedom, of intelligence and virtue, as gallantly and truly as on this field they fought in fratricidal strife, to gather the harvest the battle's red rain has made to flow, who shall regret the price paid?"

Governor Lounsbury's political career has been an enviable and brilliant one, characterized as it has been by perfect purity and fervent patriotism. His first vote was cast in 1862 for Abraham Lincoln and from that day he has always been a devoted Republican. In 1874, he served in the Connecticut Legislature, representing his native place, and his services in that body, both on committee work and as Speaker, won such unanimous commendation that he soon became a leader in his party. It was largely through his efforts that the local option laws, which were passed in the State, were enacted, and however they may have antagonized certain classes, it is certain that they [p.405] elevated him in the esteem of all whose esteem is worth having. It was by his speeches in favor of temperance that he first won the reputation of being one of the orators of the State, and in the Blaine campaign of 1884, he added largely to this reputation.

At these State conventions, he was brought forward as candidate for Governor. In 1882, he requested that his name be withdrawn in favor of the Hon. Wm. H. Buckley, but four years later he was unanimously nominated on the first ballot.

His administration of the high office during 1887 and 1888, was characterized by wisdom and patriotism and firmness, such as entitle him to rank high compared with his predecessors. A notable instance of how his influence was felt was shown in the "Incorrigible Criminals Act." This provides that a person who has been twice convicted of an offense, involving a term of not less than two years in prison, shall on the third conviction be sentenced to imprisonment for twenty-five years. Governor Lounsbury believed that a life sentence should be imposed in such cases, and said so in a message in which he brought the subject to the attention of the Legislature, his strongest argument being that the State prison is primarily for the protection of society, an idea which has resulted recently, in one State at least, in the imposition of a life penalty, although it was thought best not to impose the life sentence, the twenty-five year term in most cases amounting to practically the same thing.

Politics ran high during Governor Lounsbury's time, yet when his term came to an end, even his most bitter political foes could find no peg upon which to hang a just criticism, and on nearly all sides it was admitted that he was one of the best executives the State had ever had. His integrity was beyond question, his courtesy to all never failing, and his splendid business tact and his evident inclination to administer State affairs on purely business principles gained him the admiration of friends and antagonists alike throughout the commonwealth. It is seldom that a man retiring from a public office is enabled to carry with him such universal esteem and commendation.

Even The Hartford Daily Times, the leading Democratic newspaper of Connecticut, was impelled to say of him editorially:

"While our political preferences did not favor his election to the Chief Magistracy of the State, and while we had at the outset some doubts as to the probable methods of his official course, we very frankly say that he has been one of the best Governors Connecticut has ever had. Governor Lounsbury unquestionably retires from office with the respect and hearty good feeling of every one, irrespective of party, with whom he has been brought into official personal relations."

Governor Lounsbury married Miss Jennie Wright, daughter of Neziah Wright, one of the founders of The American Bank Note Company, in 1867, and his domestic relations are of the happiest. In religion, he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, having been a lay delegate to the General Conference in 1886. He has been for many years a trustee of the Wesleyan University at Middletown, Connecticut, which conferred the degree of Doctor of Laws upon him in 1887.

Among the organizations to which he belongs are the Colonial and Republican clubs of New York, and the Mystic Tie and Jerusalem Lodge, F. and A.M., Ridgefield, Conn. He is a Royal Arch Master of Eureka Chapter, Danbury, Conn., a Knight Templar of Crusader Commandery of the same place, and a noble of the Mystic Shrine, attached to Pyramid Temple, Bridgeport, Conn.

Governor Lounsbury is a trustee in The American Bank Note Co. and chairman [p.406] of the executive committee of The Washington Trust Co. and holds official positions in several other financial institutions.

(America's Successful Men)

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From Londesborough to Lounsbury
The family of the mansion

By The Ridgefield Press on April 29, 2013


The grand and beautiful Lounsbury mansion on Main Street, the towns Community Center for the last 60 years, tells much of the history of Ridgefield since the late 19th Century. It was at first the centerpiece of a great estate, the home of former Connecticut Governor Phineas G. Lounsbury, who grew up on a farm in Ridgefield and became a wealthy New York banker.

He built himself the neo-Classical Revival mansion with a servants dining room in the basement, just as Downton Abbey has. He called it Grovelawn.

The Ridgefield he grew up in, during the mid-19th Century, was a small farming village that was starting to become an industrial town like so many others in Connecticut. But in the latter part of the century it changed direction, industry dwindled, and it became known as a summer resort for rich New Yorkers. They built their mansions, brought their carriages, and hired flocks of servants.

Lounsbury built his mansion in 1896 and lived in it as well as his other houses in New York, Florida, and the Adirondacks and entertained his well-connected friends there until he died in 1925.

Then for almost 30 years Lounsbury House stood empty, almost totally unused, unheated in winter, its appearance deteriorating to the point where demolition became a possibility. However, in spite of its appearance, the house remained sound because it had a good foundation and had been strongly built with first-growth lumber. It was beautifully finished inside with mahogany throughout.

The town of Ridgefield bought the house and all its surrounding property and its many ancillary buildings from Lounsburys descendents in 1945 for $59,000 (about $760,000 in todays money), but the mansion remained essentially unused and unheated until 1953.

Then three Ridgefield women spearheaded a drive to turn Grovelawn into a community center and they found crucial support among Ridgefield veterans who wanted a suitable memorial for fallen comrades. The town voted on Oct. 1, 1953, to rent the building for $1 a year to the newly constituted Ridgefield Veterans Memorial Community Association, more commonly known now as Lounsbury House or the Community Center.

With $27,000 in donations and a lot of physical labor from some of towns prominent ladies and sometimes their maids and husbands the new Center completed enough repairs and redecoration to open its doors to the public on Memorial Day, 1954. It soon became the focus of town activities.

The beautiful rooms were used free or at reduced rates by dozens of non-profit organizations. Sunday pot-luck suppers became a favorite in a town, which then was then a little too quiet. The Center offered classes in a whole range of subjects, from chair caning to dancing. A shooting club made use of the space under the front porch for a pistol range. Weddings in the spacious setting of the Center became a healthy source of income.

Today the mansion still dominates Main Street, as beautiful as ever, still active, and still in constant need of repairs, and still supported by the efforts of many volunteers.

The First Lounsberry

The first of the large and widespread American Lounsbury clan was Richard Lounsberry (there are many variant spellings of the name), baptized on Nov. 9, 1634, in the parish of Harkness in North Yorkshire, near the village of Broxa, where his father farmed. A New York genealogist commissioned by Phineas Lounsbury wrote in 1896 that the family got its name from Conrad de Landsberg, who built Landsberg Castle in Alsace in 1181. At some point during the Norman occupation the Landsbergs moved to England. But it seems more likely the name came from the village of Londesborough in Yorkshire, listed in the Domesday Book (1086) as Lodensborough.

Richard Lounsberry emigrated to the American Colonies and married Elizabeth Pennoyer in Rye, New York, in 1679. Four generations later, Nathan Lounsbury and his wife, Delia, were farming successfully in Pound Ridge. They had three daughters and three sons, two of whom, George and Phineas, became governors of Connecticut.

By the time the youngest, Phineas, was born in 1841 the family had moved to another farm, called The Hickories, in Ridgefield, still an active farm located along what is now Lounsbury Road with the original house still standing and occupied.

In a speech at Ridgefields bicentennial celebrations in 1908, Phineas who was much given to oratory said he had received the old style New England training, which involved judicious tannings and much prayer. On Sundays the whole family walked three miles to the Methodist Church in town, to attend the preaching service and Sunday school. Afterwards they walked the three miles back to spend the remainder of the day in reading, meditation and prayer.

Phineas was a life-long, fervent enemy of strong drink and an opponent of what he called liberalist thinking.

The children attended the little red school in Farmingville where they learned to dance the two-step to the time of the tingling birch wielded by Colonel Hiram Scott, later town clerk. Phineas finished his education with four years at a private school in Ridgefield, graduating at 16 and going to New York to seek his fortune, which he imagined to be $10,000, leaving behind the only girl I thought worth knowing. In fact, he eventually created an enormous fortune and found a girl in New York well worth knowing.

Lounsbury went to work as a shoe store clerk in New York and over several years learned the shoe business. He was 20 when the Civil War broke out and a year later, on Aug. 11, 1862, in response to an appeal from President Lincoln for volunteers, he joined 161 men from Ridgefield who enlisted in the 17th Connecticut Infantry Regiment.

On the way to Virginia many of the volunteers were felled by fevers and putrid food, among them Lounsbury, who was left behind in a hospital as the regiment marched into Virginia. He was discharged because of disability on Dec. 12, four months after enlisting. Thus he missed Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, but he remained close to the regiment after the war. He became president of the regiments veterans association and delivered a 42-minute oration at the dedication of a monument to the regiment at Gettysburg in 1884.

Since no extensive study of Lounsburys life exists (and the late town historian Richard Venus complained once he couldnt find any anecdotes about him), it is sometimes difficult to sort out the details from the sketchy and contradictory biographies published over the years.

We know that right after the Civil War, Phineas and his older brother, George, were in business together manufacturing shoes in New Haven. As the company grew they moved it to South Norwalk, took in a partner and as Lounsbury, Mathewson & Co., it became a major manufacturer of womens shoes. Eventually the company employed 300 people in a four-storey factory.

Phineass business acumen became even more evident as he moved into banking business in New York, joined the boards of several companies. He cemented his ties to the banking business by marrying Jennie Wright of New York at the Washington Square church on June 12, 1867. She was the daughter of Neziah Wright, a founder and trustee of the American Bank Note Company, who had become the companys treasurer a month earlier. Lounsbury was a trustee of the company and had a long connection with the Merchants Exchange Bank, eventually becoming president in 1894. He had offices on Broadway and a town house believed to be on West 72d Street, described as the queen street of the West Side.

(This is the first in a series of occasional articles about the history of Lounsbury Mansion, the home of Governor Phineas Lounsbury and now the Ridgefield Community Center.)

Written by Jeremy Main

http://www.theridgefieldpress.com/17218/from-londesborough-to-lounsbury/


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

More About PHINEAS CHAPMAN LOUNSBURY:

Military: 1861, 4 months with 17th CT Volunteer Regiment, discharge due to severe illness
Occupation 1: Banker
Occupation 2: Manufacturer, in association with brother, of shoes in New Haven, CT
Occupation 3: 1858, Shoe clerk, New York, NY
Occupation 4: 1869, Shoe manufacturing moved to South Norwalk, CT
Offices held 1: 1874, State of CT Legistature
Offices held 2: Between Jan 1887 - Jan 1889, Governor of Connecticut
Religion: Methodist

Source: http://boards.ancestry.co.uk/localities.northam.canada.ontario.kent/960.964.3.1/mb.ashx 
Lounsbury, Phineas Chapman (I34554077531)
 
5358 Private Lounsbury died of Typhoid Fever while serving in the Union Army.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSsr=41&GScid=1832306&GRid=9393076&



26 Aug 1850 census of Bethany, New Haven County, CT, found the Lounsbury family living in dwelling #114:

Abraham Lounsbury 51 CT Farmer
Emily 42 CT
David A. 19 CT Farmer
John W. 11 CT


20 July 1860 census of Bethany, New Haven County, CT, found the Lounsbury family living in dwelling #92:

Emily Lounsbury 52 CT Farmer
John W. 21 CT Farm laborer



Killed at age 24 during the Civil War in Washington D.C., 8 Dec 1862, while serving with the 27th Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers. 
Lounsbury, John Wesley (I34554077032)
 
5359 R. L. Polk's City Directory for Watsonville, Santa Cruz County, CA, in 1939 showed Louis Lowe and family living at P.O. Box 394.



22 April 1940 census of Pajaro, Monterey County, CA (Dist 27-51), showed the Lowe family living in dwelling #164 (Spillman Farm). They same that they had lived at the same location on 1 April 1935:

Louis B. Lowe 30 MO - 8 years of education, Laborer - WPA Levee Construction
Ada 28 OK - 7 years of education
Norma L. 6 CA
Barbara Ann 5 CA
Evalina 2 CA


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Norma Lowe and Alvin James eloped. Norma's father, Louis Lowe, disapproved and had the marriage annulled.  
Lowe, Norma Louise (I34554068257)
 
5360 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554068258)
 
5361 R. L. Polk's City Directory for Watsonville, Santa Cruz County, CA, in 1939 showed Louis Lowe and family living at P.O. Box 394.



22 April 1940 census of Pajaro, Monterey County, CA (Dist 27-51), showed the Lowe family living in dwelling #164 (Spillman Farm). They same that they had lived at the same location on 1 April 1935:

Louis B. Lowe 30 MO - 8 years of education, Laborer - WPA Levee Construction
Ada 28 OK - 7 years of education
Norma L. 6 CA
Barbara Ann 5 CA
Evalina 2 CA 
Lowe, Eva Irene (I34554068259)
 
5362 Rebecca (Rebeckah) KENNEDY. Born about 1773 in Frederick County, Maryland. Rebecca (Rebeckah) died in Kentucky on September 24, 1855; she was 82. [7] Buried in Paris, Bourbon County, Kentucky.

On July 25, 1793 when Rebecca (Rebeckah) was 20, she married Josiah ASHURST, son of ASHURST, in Bedford County, Virginia. [8] Born about 1768 in Savannah, Georgia. Josiah died in Clintonville, Bourbon County, Kentucky in 1820; he was 52. [9]

They moved to Kentucky November, 1794, and settled near Clintonville. [10]

They had the following children:
20 i. Martha "Patsy" (1794-1863)
21 ii. Nancy (~1788-)
iii. Mary Ann "Polly". Born about 1790 in North Middletown, Bourbon County, Kentucky.
Mary Ann "Polly" married Sanford Buford GORHAM Jr.. Born in 1803.
iv. Robert. Born about 1785 in Baughman's Creek, Fayette, Kentucky. [11]
On June 24, 1822 when Robert was 37, he married Nancy B. JONES, daughter of James JONES (1758-1839) & Salathial "Sally" SCHOOLER (1760-1850), in Bourbon County, Kentucky. [11] Born on December 10, 1789 in Baughman's Creek, Fayette County, Kentucky. Nancy B. died in Georgetown, Kentucky on November 11, 1881; she was 91.
22 v. John Kennedy (~1787-)
vi. Paulina. Born about 1798 in Baughman's Creek, Fayette, Kentucky. [11]
about 1821 when Paulina was 23, she first married John JONES, son of James JONES (1758-1839) & Salathial "Sally" SCHOOLER (1760-1850), in Baughman's Creek, Fayette, Kentucky. [11] Born on April 10, 1794 in Baughman's Creek, Fayette County, Kentucky. John died on October 17, 1819; he was 25.
On October 4, 1827 when Paulina was 29, she second married Preston GRIFFING, in North Middletown, Bourbon County, Kentucky.
23 vii. William (1800-)


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Rebecah was also married in Virginia by Josiah Ashurst, a very industrious farmer and mechanic - a brickmason. He also migrated to Kentucky and settled on his wifes land when after raising a family of sons and domicile where her husband died.

http://www.kykinfolk.com/bourbon/KennedyFamily.html 
Kennedy, Rebecca (I34554069745)
 
5363 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075734)
 
5364 ref. Gail Elizabeth Maddox, 9/21/2004. Haywood, John Clayton (I34554076580)
 
5365 ref. Gail Elizabeth Maddox, 9/21/2004. Gentry, Anna Delana (I34554076581)
 
5366 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554076293)
 
5367 Ref. Mrs. Effie Mae (Parkinson) Rotramel, 332 W. Madison, Boliver, Mo.:
Ms. Owen Parks, 1120 Katy, Altus, Ok. 73521 dated 10/27/1991:
"History of Polk Co., Missouri", by


25 June 1880 census of Dickson, Benton County, AR, found Jonathan Rotramel and family living in dwelling #107. Neighbor in dwelling #115 was Rebecca Easley and family:

Jonathan L. Rotramel 38 AR TN TN farmer
Mary J. 34 TN TN TN
Daniel H. 11 AR AR TN
Nancy E. 9 AR AR TN
Joseph W. 7 AR AR TN
Amanda C. 2 AR AR TN
James W. Hosman 16 AR MO TN stepson



2 June 1900 census of Benton, Polk County, MO, found the Austin family living in dwelling #12, next door to father Jesse Austin and family in dwelling #13. John and Lizzie said that they had been married 5 years and 3 of their 4 children were still living:

Jhon L. Austin 2/1874 26 AR TN TN - Farmer
Lizzie N. 11/1873 26 AR TN AR
Elmer D. 12/1896 3 AR AR AR
Lester A. 12/1898 1 AR AR AR
Verby M. 4/1900 1/12 MO AR AR 
Rotramel, Nancy Elizabeth (I34554075805)
 
5368 Refer to http://www.iltrails.org/jasper/kibler.html


8 Dec 1850 census of Newton, Jasper County, IL, found the Kibler family living in dwelling #144. Neighbors included Sarah's parents, John and Mary Brooks, in dwelling #145 and her sister Wealthy Brooks Earnest in dwelling #146:

Silas Kilber 24 PA - Farmer
Sarah 21 IN


1860 census of Jasper, Jasper County, IL, found the Kibler family living in dwelling #636:

Silas L. Kibler 33 VA - Farmer
Sara 30 IN
Rosanna 10 IL
Samuel Dodd 13 IL


10 June 1870 census of Wade, Jasper County, IL, found Silas and Sarah Kibler living in dwelling #305. Next door in #306 was daughter Rosanna and her husband Robert Ping:

Silas Kibler 43 PA
Sarah 34 IN


21 June 1880 census of Wade, Jasper County, IL, found the Kibler family living in dwelling #293:

Siles Kibler 53 VA PA PA - Works in shoe shop
Sarah 51 IN MD NY



Husband of Sarah (Brooks) Kibler, Silas was a shoemaker who died of consumption at his home near Falmouth, Jasper County, IL.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSsr=201&GScid=2148261&GRid=16197913&CScn=brooks&CScntry=4&CSst=16&CScnty=729& 
Kibler, Silas Luther (I34554068057)
 
5369 Rent and Trintje Ontkes were listed as passengers aboard the ship Tuisko that arrived in New York from Bremen, Germany, on 21 Sept 1868. Rent gave his age as 24 years 6 months and Trintje gave hers as 21 years 7 months. Both said that they were born in Prussia. They listed their final destination as Illinois.


23 June 1870 census of Pekin, Tazewell County, IL, found the Ontkes family living in dwelling #95:

Rent Onkes 26 Prussia - Railroad hand
Frenk 24 Prussia
Louise 9/12 IL


12 June 1880 census of Washington, Yolo County, CA, found the Ontkes family living in dwelling #122:

Rent H. Ontkes 36 Hanover, Germany Farmer
Katherine 33 Hanover, Germany
Louisa 10 IL
Martha 8 IL
Norm 6 IL
Dick 4 CA
Katherine 3/12 CA Born 9/1880


In 1890, Rent H. Ontkes was listed as a registered voter in Placer County, CA.


16 June 1900 census of Prairie Creek, Logan County, IL, found the Ontkes family living in dwelling #113. Rent and Trientje said that they had been married 32 years and 7 of their 9 children were still living. They also said that they both had immigrated to the United States in 1868:

Rent Ontkes 2/1844 56 Germany Germany Germany - Farmer
Thrintje 1/1847 53 Germany Germany Germany
Caraline 2/1883 17 CA Germany Germany
Heinerich 3/1885 15 CA Germany Germany


15 April 1910 census of Emden, Logan County, IL, found the Ontkes family living in dwelling #3. Rent and Trientje said that they had been married 41 years and 7 of their 9 children were still living. They also said that they both had immigrated to the United States in 1868:

Rent H. Ontkes 66 Germany Germany Germany - Own income
Trindje D. 63 Germany Germany Germany



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Biographical Sketch garygibbon1 added this on 17 Apr 2010

Obituary for Trintje shows his name as Rent Holms Ontkes. A New York Passenger list shows Rent and his wife arriving 21 Sep 1868 on the Tuisko in New York from Bremen, Germany. An obituary record says they Left Bremen, Germany and emigrated to the United States August 3, 1868 and that they came in a sailing vessel and were eight weeks on the ocean finally landing in New York. They came west and settled at Pekin Ill. where they remained six years. The family then moved to Steamboat Rock, Hardin Co., Iowa and stayed two years. In 1876 the family removed to California, near Sacramento, where they remained fifteen years. In 1891 Illinois became their home. In 1904 they retired from active farm work and made their home in Emden. 1880 census shows Rent H. Ontkes living in Washington, Yolo county, California. Farmer, Married,age 36, father and mother born in Hanover. Fam Hist. Lib Film #1254086 page 309A Rent H Ontkes is listed as a registered voter in the Placer County CA Great Register of Voters for 1890. It shows him as a native of Germany, resident of Pino(the former name of Loomis)in Placer County, and age 46. It says there that he was Naturalized in the Placer County Superior Court on 3 April 1888. However, a search of the court record cards failed to turn up his card. Possibly the card was lost on somehow omitted from the indexes or the Voters Register is in error regarding the place or year of his naturalization. 1910 Census finds him in Logan County, Orvil Township, Illnois with his wife Trientje and said under occupation that he had his own income 1910 Census also shows Naturalization Date of 1868. Age 66 Married 41 years. They had nine children.

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/3328415/person/496714657/comments?pg=32768 
Ontkes, Rent Harm (I34554071767)
 
5370 Rent and Trintje Ontkes were listed as passengers aboard the ship Tuisko that arrived in New York from Bremen, Germany, on 21 Sept 1868. Rent gave his age as 24 years 6 months and Trintje gave hers as 21 years 7 months. Both said that they were born in Prussia. They listed their final destination as Illinois.


23 June 1870 census of Pekin, Tazewell County, IL, found the Ontkes family living in dwelling #95:

Rent Onkes 26 Prussia - Railroad hand
Frenk 24 Prussia
Louise 9/12 IL


12 June 1880 census of Washington, Yolo County, CA, found the Ontkes family living in dwelling #122:

Rent H. Ontkes 36 Hanover, Germany Farmer
Katherine 33 Hanover, Germany
Louisa 10 IL
Martha 8 IL
Norm 6 IL
Dick 4 CA
Katherine 3/12 CA Born 9/1880


16 June 1900 census of Prairie Creek, Logan County, IL, found the Ontkes family living in dwelling #113. Rent and Trientje said that they had been married 32 years and 7 of their 9 children were still living. They also said that they both had immigrated to the United States in 1868:

Rent Ontkes 2/1844 56 Germany Germany Germany - Farmer
Thrintje 1/1847 53 Germany Germany Germany
Caraline 2/1883 17 CA Germany Germany
Heinerich 3/1885 15 CA Germany Germany


15 April 1910 census of Emden, Logan County, IL, found the Ontkes family living in dwelling #3. Rent and Trientje said that they had been married 41 years and 7 of their 9 children were still living. They also said that they both had immigrated to the United States in 1868:

Rent H. Ontkes 66 Germany Germany Germany - Own income
Trindje D. 63 Germany Germany Germany


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Biographical Sketch garygibbon1 added this on 17 Apr 2010

Baptized, Confirmed, and Married in Lutheran Church in Norden. Local historians note that Pekin was a mecca for Ostfrieslanders in the early days with few coming to Central Illinois before 1865. Grandpa said they were from NW Germany. Rent and Trientje came to Pekin, Ill. in 1868 and lived there for 6 years then moved to Steamboat Rock, Hardin County, Iowa for 2 years then in 1876 they went to near Sacramento, California for 15 years, then in 1891 they went back to Illinois and lived on a farm south of Emden. Lived in Emden for 28 years and were faithful members of St. Peters Lutheran Church. 1880 census shows name as Katharine Ontkes, born in 1847, married to Rent H. Ontkes, age 33, parents born in Hanover. census in Washington, Yolo, California. 1910 Census shows the couple in Logan County, Orvil Township, Illnois. She is shown as age 63 having nine children born with seven living. Naturalized 1868. 1930 Census in Emden Village, Orvil Township, Logan County, Illnois shows Triny Ontkes age 83 Widdowed but sex as M. In about 1930 she visited her children in California, Washington and Canada.

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/3328415/person/496731539/comments?pg=32768 
Fink, Trintje Dreegmeÿer (I34554071768)
 
5371 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075902)
 
5372 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075906)
 
5373 Res. 1992, Rogers, Ark.: Matlock, Bill (I34554076283)
 
5374 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554076093)
 
5375 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554076219)
 
5376 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554076220)
 
5377 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554076222)
 
5378 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075894)
 
5379 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075896)
 
5380 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554076493)
 
5381 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075905)
 
5382 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075745)
 
5383 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075740)
 
5384 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075739)
 
5385 Res. Honolulu, Hawaii: Had a traditional Hawaiian marriage ceramony. Harold J. Maddox Jr. her uncle gave the bride away.: No Amato Children: kymmie Cherry <kymmiescherry@yahoo.com>18 Jan 2000 Kimberly (Maddox) Gray Amato, Melvin (I34554076495)
 
5386 Res. Liberal, Mo.: patricia arnold <parnold11@cox.net> 21 Nov 2002 Arnold, Julie (Judy) (I34554076365)
 
5387 Res. Mt. Pleasant, Benton Co., Ark.: had sugar diabetes: Funeral conducted by Callison-Lough Funeral Home, Gravette, Ark.: Puryear, Robert Nathan (I34554075750)
 
5388 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075685)
 
5389 Res. Pittsburg, Kans.: "patricia arnold" <parnold11@cox.net> 21 Nov 2002 Ronnie &Patricia strted living together in 1980 & married Nov. 11, 1984: Arnold, Ronnie Ray Sr. (I34554076363)
 
5390 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075898)
 
5391 Res. Prattville, Tulsa County, Okla.: U.S. Army 45th Div.-Thunderbird-: Oil field worker 1940's in Colo.: Harvey, Jeffie Charles (I34554075694)
 
5392 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075728)
 
5393 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075895)
 
5394 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075904)
 
5395 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075903)
 
5396 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075901)
 
5397 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075900)
 
5398 Res. Wichita, Ks.:

12 April 1930 census of Dickson, Benton County, AR, found the Rotramel family living in dwelling #63. Martin and Alice said that they were first married at ages 27 and 17 respectively. Also in the household was Martin's widowed brother Joseph W. Rotramel:

Martin M. Rotronmel 48 AR TN TN Farmer
Alice M. 37 AR England AR
Ethel A. 19 AR AR AR
Kay E. 17 AR AR AR
Edna D. 15 AR AR AR
Evort D. 12 AR AR AR
Gertie P. 10 AR AR AR
Bertha G. 8 AR AR AR
Esther G. 6 AR AR AR
Dorothy A. 4 1/12 AR AR AR
Cany G. 2 3/12 AR AR AR
Joseph W. Rotronmel 54 AR AR TN Laborer - Farm, Widow 
Rotramel, Constance Jean "Connie" (I34554076090)
 
5399 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075751)
 
5400 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I34554075752)
 

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